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WAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY 

THE Z. SMITH REYNOLDS LIBRARY 






CALL NO. 

B 
378 
W13J 
v.77 
1982/83 
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NOT TO BE CIRCULATE!: 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



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1982-1983 




New Series February 1982 Volume 77, Number 1 



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Bulletin of the 

Wake Forest University 

Graduate School 

Including 

The Bowman Gray School of Medicine 

Announcements for 

1982-1983 



The Bulletin of Wake Forest University is published seven times annually by the University at Winston-Salem, North Carolii 

Second class postage paid at Winston-Salem, North Carolina 

USPS 078-320 

Printed by Winston Printing Company, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27105 



#Att FOREST UNIVERSH 
UBRARY 




Watlington Hall — Hawthorne Campus 



The Calendar 



lay 



ily 

dy 

ily 

ugust 



Summer Session 1982 Reynolda Campus 
First Term 

26 Wednesday Registration, 8:30-1 1:30 a.m., 210Reynolda Hall 
Classes begin in the afternoon 

Examinations 



28-29 



Monday — 
Tuesday 



1 Thursday 

6 Tuesday 
23 Friday 
5—6 Thursday - 
Friday 



Second Term 

Registration, 8:30-1 1:30 a.m., 210 Reynolda Hall 
Classes begin in the afternoon 
File statement of intent to graduate August 6 
Last day to submit thesis to graduate August 6 

Examinations 



Fall Semester 1982 Reynolda Campus and Hawthorne Campus 4 



ugust 30-31 



;ptember 

tptember 

^ptember 

?ptember 

ctober 

ovember 

ovember 25-28 

xember 11-18 



1 
14 
28 
29 

8 
29 



Monday 
Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Tuesday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Friday 

Monday 

Thursday- 
Sunday 

Saturday- 
Saturday 

Sunday- 
Wednesday 



ecember 19- 
January 12 

Spring Semester 1983 

nuary 13-14 Thursday 



Registration and orientationt 

Classes begin 

Last day to add courses 

Last day to drop courses 

File statement of intent to graduate December 18 

Fall holiday 

Last day to submit thesis to graduate December 1 8 

Thanksgiving recess 

Final examinations 

Christmas recess** 



nuary 

nuary 

bruary 

ibruary 

arch 

arch 

Mil 

ay 

ay 

*y 



12 



17 
28 

3 
11 

7 
-20 



27 
2-10 

15 
16 



Friday 

Monday 

Friday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Monday 

Saturday- 
Sunday 

Wednesday 

Saturday- 
Monday 

Sunday 

Monday 



Reynolda Campus and Hawthorne Campus 

Registration 

Classes begin 

Last day to add courses 

Founders' Day Convocation 

Last day to drop courses 

File statement of intent to graduate May 16 

Spring recess 

Last day to submit thesis to graduate May 16 

Final examinationstt 

Baccalaureate Sermon 
Commencement 



*The Bowman Gray School of Medicine of Wake Forest University 

fomentation for new Bowman Gray students will begin August 12 and classes in medical curriculum, 

August 16. September 6 and April 4 will be holidays at Bowman Gray. 
"Bowman Gray students taking courses in the medical curriculum will begin the sbnnz semester 

January 3. 

1 "Examinations for Bowman Gray students taking courses in the medical curriculum will end May 21. 



The Bulletin 



The Calendar 

The University ' j 

The Graduate School J; 

Procedures };! 

Admission J] 

Application • J^ 

Graduate Students Applying to Medical School J. 

Classification of Students J 

Tuition and Fees j! 

Housing Services J 

Food Services J| 

Health Services J 

Vehicle Registration *■ 

Educational Planning and Placement A 

Financial Assistance a 

Grading ^ 

Requirements for Degrees I 

Master of Arts | 

Master of Arts in Education | 

Master of Science 1 

Doctor of Philosophy 1 

Courses of Instruction 1 

Anatomy ~. 

Anesthesia 1 

Anthropology 1 

Biochemistry I 

Biology • 

Biostatistics and Epidemiology 

Chemistry | 

Comparative Medicine 

Education 

English 



History | 

Mathematics 

Medical Genetics 

Microbiology and Immunology 

Neuropsychology I 

Pathology 

Physical Education 

Physics 

Physiology and Pharmacology 

Psychology 

Religion 

Speech Communication and Theatre Arts ••■•••■ 

Interdisciplinary Program in Comparative and Experimental Pathology. . . 

Interdisciplinary Courses 

Research in Clinical Science Departments 

Degrees Conferred ■ 

The Board of Trustees i 

The Board of Visitors j 

The Administration J 

The Graduate Faculty J 

The Graduate Council 



5 

e 
e 

ej 



The University 



Wake Forest University is characterized by its devotion to liberal arts learning and 
professional preparation for men and women, its strong sense of community and 
fellowship, and its encouragement of free inquiry and expression. 

Founded in 1834 by the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina, the school 
opened its doors to students on February 3 as Wake Forest Institute, with Samuel 
Wait as principal. It was located in the Forest of Wake County, North Carolina, on the 
plantation of Dr. Calvin Jones, near which the Village of Wake Forest later de- 
veloped. 

Rechartered in 1838 as Wake Forest College, it is one of the oldest institutions of 
higher learning in the state. It was exclusively a college of liberal arts for men until 
1894, when the School of Law was established. The School of Medicine, founded in 
1902, offered a two-year medical program until 1941. In that year the School was- 
moved from the Town of Wake Forest to Winston-Salem, became associated with the 
North Carolina Baptist Hospital., and was renamed the Bowman Gray School o^ 
Medicine in honor of the benefactor who made possible the move and expansion to a 
full four-year program. In 1942 Wake Forest admitted women as regulai 
undergraduate students. 

A School of Business Administration was established in 1948 and for over twoj 
decades offered an undergraduate program of study in business. In 1969 the 
Babcock Graduate School of Management was formed and the professional prograrr, 
for undergraduates was phased out. On September 12, 1980, the undergraduate 
program in business and accountancy was reconstituted as the undergraduate Schoo 
of Business and Accountancy. The Division of Graduate Studies was established ir 
196 1 . It is now organized as the Graduate School and encompasses advanced work ir 
the arts and sciences on both the Revnolda and Hawthorne Campuses in Winston, 
Salem. The summer session was inaugurated in 1921. 

In 1946 the Trustees of Wake Forest College and the Baptist State Convention o 
North Carolina accepted a proposal by the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation to relocati 
the non-medical divisions of the College in Winston-Salem, where the School o 
Medicine was already established. The late Charles H. Babcock and his wife, the lal 
Mary Reynolds Babcock, contributed a campus site, and building funds were ra 
ceived from many sources. Between 1952 and 1956 the First fourteen buildings \ver< 
erected in Georgian style on the new Winston-Salem campus. In 1956 the Colleg! 
moved all operations, leaving the 122-year-old campus in the Town of Wake Fores 
to the Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary. 

The decade that followed was the College's most expansive, and in 1967 itj 
augmented character was recognized by the change in name to Wake Forest Un 
versity. Today enrollment in all schools of the University stands at over 4,70( 
Governance remains in the hands of the Board of Trustees, and development fo 
each of the five schools of the University is augmented by Boards of Visitors for th 
undergraduate College and Graduate School, the School of Law, the Graduati 
School of Management, and the School of Medicine. A joint board of Universit 
Trustees and Trustees of the North Carolina Baptist Hospital is responsible for th 



7 



Medical Center, which includes the hospital and the School of Medicine. Alumni and 
parents' organizations are also active at Wake Forest, and support by the Z. Smith 
Reynolds Foundation and other foundations and corporations is strong and con- 
:inuing. 

Wake Forest's relationship with the Baptist State Convention is an important part 
jf the school's heritage. Wake Forest's founders proposed to establish an institution 
hat would provide education under Christian influences. The basis for the con- 
inuing relationship between the University and the Convention is a mutually 
igreed-upon covenant which grows out of a commitment to God and to each other. 
rhe covenant expresses the Convention's deep interest in Christian higher education 
md the University's desire to serve the denomination as one of its constituencies. 
iVake Forest receives significant financial and intangible support from Convention- 
iffiliated churches. 

The College, undergraduate School of Business and Accountancy, Graduate 
ichool, School of Law, and Graduate School of Management are located on the 
leynolda Campus in northwest Winston-Salem. The Bowman Gray School of Medi- 
ine is about four miles away, near the city's downtown on what is known as the 
lawthorne Campus. The University also offers instruction regularly at Casa Artom 
n Venice, at Worrell House in London, and in other places around the world. 

1 he undergraduate faculties offer courses of study leading to the baccalaureate in 
hirty departments and interdisciplinary areas. The School of Law offers the Juris 
)octor and the Graduate School of Management the Master of Business Administra- 
ion degree. In addition to the Doctor of Medicine degree, the School of Medicine 
offers through the Graduate School programs leading to the Master of Science and 
)octor of Philosophy degrees in the basic medical sciences. The Graduate School 
onfers the Master of Arts, Master of Arts in Education, and Master of Science 
egrees in the arts and sciences and the Doctor of Philosophy degree in biology and 
hemistry. 

Libraries 

The libraries of Wake Forest University support research in undergraduate educa- 
on and in each of the disciplines in which a graduate degree is offered. An 
ndowment provided by a substantial gift from the Mary Reynolds Babcock Founda- 
'on and another from Nancy Reynolds has been assigned to the sustained expansion 
nd development of library resources, especially to support the graduate program, 
he libraries of the University hold membership in the Association of Southeastern 
esearch Libraries. 

\ The library collections total 818,711 volumes. Of these, 624,367 constitute the 
eneral collection in the Z. Smith Reynolds Library, 83,1 12 are housed in the School 
f Law, 98,761 in thelibrary of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine, and 12,471 ina 
blatively new library in the Babcock Graduate School of Management. Subscriptions 
i> 9,989 periodicals and serials, largelv of scholarly content, are maintained by the 
i>ur libraries of the University. The holdings of the Z. Smith Reynolds Library also 
iclude 24,057 reels of microfilm, 265,303 pieces of microcards, microprint, and 
ucrofiche, and 77,045 volumes of United States government publications. 



Special collections cover the works of selected late nineteenth and early twentieth 
century English and American writers, with pertinent critical material, a Mark Twain 
Collection, a Gertrude Stein Collection, and the Ethel Taylor Crittenden Collection 
in Baptist History. The recent acquisition of the Charles H. Babcock Collection of 
Rare and Fine Books represents an important addition to the resources of the Z. 
Smith Reynolds Library. 

The library instructional program includes an orientation workshop in research 
methods, assistance in independent and directed studies, and bibliographic pre- 
sentations as requested by faculty. 

Recognition and Accreditation 

Wake Forest University is a member of the Southern Association of Colleges and 
Schools, the Southern Universities Conference, the Association of American Col- 
leges, the Conference of Southern Graduate Schools, and the Council of Graduate 
Schools in the United States. The University has chapters of the principal national 
social fraternities, professional fraternities, and honor societies, including Phi Beta 
Kappa and Sigma Xi. The Bowman Gray School of Medicine is a member of the 
Association of American Medical Colleges and is on the approved list of the Council 
on Medical Education of the American Medical Association. The program in 
counseling leading to the Master of Arts in Education degree is accredited by the 
National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education. 

Wake Forest College was accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and 
Schools in 1921. The reaccreditation of 1965 included the master's and doctoral 
degree programs in the Division of Graduate Studies. Accreditation was reaffirmed 
in December 1975. 




The Scales Fine Arts Center on the Reynolda Campus 




Reynolda Hall 



10 I 

The Graduate School 1 

In accord with the prevailing custom among American colleges during the 
antebellum period, Wake Forest granted honorary master's degrees to selected 
alumni. By 1862, when the College closed temporarily because of the Civil War, 
twenty-nine such degrees had been awarded. The first announcement of a program 
of study leading to an earned graduate degree at Wake Forest was made in 1866. 
Between 1871, when the first degrees earned under the plan were awarded to John 
Bruce Brewer (grandson of Samuel Wait) and Franklin Hobgood, and 1951, 383 
Master of Arts and Master of Science degrees were granted. In 1949 the School of 
Arts and Sciences discontinued admitting applicants for the Master of Arts degree 
because the rapid increase in the size of the undergraduate student body following 
World War II had overloaded the faculty. The School of Medicine did not interrupt 
its graduate program. The first Master of Science degree conferred by the School 
after it moved to Winston-Salem was awarded in 1943, and the degree was regularly 
offered thereafter by the departments of anatomy, biochemistry, microbiology, 
pharmacology, and physiology. 

During the fifteen years the College and the School of Medicine were located in 
different towns, the study of graduate education continued on both campuses. The. 
self-study report adopted by the faculty of the School of Arts and Sciences im-j 
mediately prior to its removal to Winston-Salem recommended that graduate study 
leading to the master's degree be resumed as soon as practicable. In 1958 the 
administration of the School of Medicine, in view of an increasing demand for, 
graduate instruction in basic medical and clinical sciences, appointed a Committee onj 
Graduate Studies for the purpose of reorganizing the graduate program. 

As a result of these two parallel studies and in recognition of the need for an 
institution-wide approach to graduate education, the Trustees on January 13, 1961 
established the Division of Graduate Studies and authorized it to grant the Master ot 
Arts degree in the School of Arts and Sciences and the Master of Science and Doctor 
of Philosophy degrees in the School of Medicine. The first Ph.D. degree was awarded 
in 1964. In 1967 the Master of Arts in Education degree was added to the graduate 
program in arts and sciences. The first Ph.D. program on the Revnolda Campus was 
begun in 1970. 



Statement of Purpose 

In December 1979 the Trustees adopted the following statement of the purpose 
and objectives of the University: 

Wake Forest is a university entrusted with a vital religious heritage and 
an equally vital tradition of academic freedom. Recognizing the special 
character of its obligation as an educational institution. Wake Forest 
assumes the responsibility of insuring that the Christian faith will be an 
integral part of the University's common life. The University maintains 
its historic religious perspective through an association with the Baptist 



11 

churches of North Carolina, the visible symbol and ministry of the 
campus church, the chaplaincy, and the Christian commitment of indi- 
viduals within the faculty and administration. At Wake Forest, those who 
represent this perspective engage in a continuing dialogue with those of 
other views who join with them in dedication to teaching and learning. 
Together they assume responsibility for the integrity of the institution 
and for its commitment to academic excellence. 

In keeping with its belief in the value of community, Wake Forest also 
recognizes an obligation to preserve its atmosphere of mutual respect 
and of openness to diverse interests and concerns. Its religious heritage, 
which continues to find expression in tradition, ritual, and convocation, 
provides unifying and sustaining values beneficial to the whole commun- 
ity. Because of its heritage, Wake Forest fosters honesty and good will, 
and it encourages the various academic disciplines to relate their particu- 
lar subjects to the fundamental questions which pertain to all human 
endeavor. 

Along with the value of community, Wake Forest respects the value of 
the individual, which it expresses through its concern for the education 
of the whole person. In view of this concern, a basic curriculum com- 
posed of the liberal arts and sciences is essential to the objectives of the 
College. This means that though the usefulness of professional and 
technical courses is acknowledged, it is necessary that such courses be 
related to a comprehensive program of humanistic and scientific studies. 
In particular, this objective requires an acceptable level of proficiency in 
those linguistic and mathematical skills which are basic to other pursuits. 
It also calls for a study of the major contributions from one or more 
representative areas within the natural sciences, the social sciences, and 
the humanities, including an examination of integrating disciplines such 
as religion, philosophy, and history. Such a course of study, when made 
an essential part of the total offering, prevents the premature specializa- 
tion which threatens effective communication among the disciplines, 
and it addresses the fundamental as well as the vocational needs of the 
student. Wake Forest expects that all of the courses in its curriculum will 
make significant demands upon the talents of the student and will 
encourage the development of a humane disposition and inquiring 
spirit. 

The Graduate School, operating within the framework of these principles, seeks to 
provide a community of faculty and advanced students dedicated to teaching, re- 
search, and productive scholarship. Through graduate programs in the arts and 
sciences and the basic medical sciences, an effort is made to expand the frontiers of 
knowledge and to keep abreast of man's understanding of the rapidly changing 
human environment. As a significant feature of the educational process, students are 
.ncouraged to develop the initiative, resourcefulness, and responsibility required of 
those who become independent intellectual leaders in their chosen fields of en- 
deavor. 



12 



Administration 



The Graduate School is administered by a Graduate Council composed of three ex 
officio administrative officials and nine faculty members elected bv the Graduate 
School faculty. Six of the nine are members of the College faculty (Reynolda Cam- 
pus) and three are members of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine faculty 
(Hawthorne Campus) . The members of the Graduate Council comprise the Commit- 
tee for Graduate Studies in the Arts and Sciences and the Committee for Biomedical 
Graduate Studies, which are responsible on the respective campuses for such matters 
as the admission of students. 




Dean of the Graduate School Henry Smith Stroupe 



13 

Procedures 



All students are responsible for familiarizing themselves with the portions of this bulletin 
which pertain to their course of study. Statements concerning courses and expenses should not be 
regarded as irrevocable contracts between the student and the institution. The University 
reserves the right to change the schedule of classes and the cost of instruction at any time within 
the student's term of residence. 

ADMISSION 

Eligibility. Undergraduates in their senior year and graduates of accredited col- 
leges or universities may apply for admission to the Graduate School for study on the 
Reynolda Campus or in the Bowman Gray School of Medicine on the Hawthorne 
Campus. Medical students who have satisfactorily completed or will complete by the 
end of the spring semester at least one year of the medical curriculum may apply for 
admission to the Graduate School. The Graduate School also accepts applications 
from holders of the M.D., D.D.S., or D.V.M. degrees, or from candidates for these 
degrees who will have satisfactorily completed the prescribed medical curriculum 
prior to matriculation in the Graduate School. 

Whatever their previous academic training may have been, all applicants must 
have superior records. This requirement is usually interpreted as at least a B average 
or standing in the upper quarter of the class or both. 

Graduate Record Examinations. All applicants are required to submit scores on the 
Aptitude Test and the Advanced Test of the Graduate Record Examinations admin- 
istered by the Educational Testing Service, Box 955, Princeton, New Jersey 08541.* 
Usually these examinations are taken between October and January of the student's 
senior year. The national administration of the GRE normally falls in the months of 
January, February, April, June, October, and December each year. Applicants 
should make arrangements for taking the tests by writing the Educational Testing 
Service several weeks in advance of the testing date selected. 

Test of English as a Foreign Language. Applicants from non-English-speaking coun- 
:ries must submit satisfactory scores on the Test of English as a Foreign Language 
administered by the TOEFL Program of the Educational Testing Service. The 
TOEFL bulletin of information and registration form can be obtained at American 
embassies and consulates, offices of the United States Information Service, United 
States educational commissions and foundations abroad, and at binational centers. 
Students unable to obtain a bulletin from one of the above should write for it to Test 
of English as a Foreign Language, Box 899, Princeton, New Jersey 08541, U.S.A. 
Administrations of TOEFL are coordinated with the GRE and are available in most 
countries. Correspondence should be initiated at least three months before the 
esting date. 

"The Advanced Test is a requirement in all of the departments for which a specific test is given. 
applicants in other departments may wish to strengthen their applications fry submitting scores 
m the Advanced Test in a related field. For example, the biology test would give an indication of 
ibility to do graduate work in anatomy. 



14 



Personal Interviews. Although not required of all students, personal interviews are 
encouraged and may be specified as a requirement for some applicants. 

Dates for Applying. Students may enroll at the beginning of the fall or the spring 
semester or either summer term. Applications should be filed at least eight week: 
prior to the date of anticipated enrollment. Applicants for financial assistance for the 
academic year beginning in September should submit applications for admission 
applications for financial assistance, and all supporting documents before March 1 
Grants will be awarded by April 1 and are to be accepted or declined by April 15 

Transfer Students. Applicants for the master's degree who have completed a portion 
of their graduate training in another institution are eligible for admission but may 
not transfer for credit more than six semester hours of course work. This limitation 
does not applv to applicants for the Ph.D. degree. 

Action on Applications. Students are informed within a few weeks after receipt of the 
completed application whether or not admission has been granted. The institution 
reserves the right to refuse admission to anv applicant without assignment of reasons. 
Admission to the Graduate School does not constitute admission to candidacy for a 
graduate degree. 

Admission Deposit (Rexnolda Campus). Within three weeks after a letter of acceptance 
has been mailed bv the Dean of the Graduate School, the applicant must send an 
admission deposit of $55 to the Treasurer of Wake Forest University. This deposit is 
refundable upon request until June 30 for the fall semester or November 1 for the 
spring semester. 

Admission of Handicapped Students. The Graduate School will consider the applica- 
tion of any student on the basis of his or her academic and personal merit, regardless 
of physical handicap. Though the Revnolda and Hawthorne campuses are built on 
many levels, a system of ramps and elevators makes each building accessible to those 
in wheelchairs or with limited mobility. The University will gladlv assist handicapped 
students in making arrangements to meet special needs. Students who seek further 
information should consult the Graduate School or the University's Office of Equal 
Opportunity. 

APPLICATION 
Reynolda Campus 

ADMISSION CATEGORIES 

Regular Status in a Degree Program. A person with a superior undergraduate record 
(at least a B average or upper quarter of the class and with the appropriate courses), 
satisfactory GRE scores (including the appropriate Advanced Test if one is given), 
and good recommendations may applv for regular admission. 

Provisional Status in a Degree Program. Those who may be awaiting GRE scores or at I 
the time of application have grades slightly below those specified for regular admis- 
sion may apply for provisional admission. A student deficient in required 
undergraduate courses in the intended field of graduate study may apply in this 
category. Provisional status is limited to not more than one semester of full-time I 
study or its equivalent in part-time study. 

Unclassified Graduate Student. Applicants seeking courses for graduate credit but 



15 



not wishing to work for a graduate degree may apply for admission as unclassified or 
non-degree students. The GRE and some of the letters usually expected from former 
professors mav be waived as requirements for unclassified status. 

HOW TO APPLY 

Applicants for admission to graduate study on the Reynolda Campus should 
request the Dean of the Graduate School to send an application for admission form. 
This form should be filled in completely and returned, along with a non-refundable 
application fee of $10. Checks should be payable to Wake Forest University. The 
address is Dean of the Graduate School, Wake Forest University, 7487 Revnolda 
|Station, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109 (telephone 919-761-5301). 

Applicants must have each college or university which they have attended send one 
copy of an official transcript of their record to the Dean of the Graduate School. If 
the bachelor's degree has not been conferred at the time the transcript is sent, one 
copy of an official supplementary transcript must be forwarded soon after gradua- 
tion. 

Applicants must request letters of evaluation from three persons, at least two of 
whom are professors who have taught them in their majors. Letters are to be mailed 
idirectly by the writers to the Dean of the Graduate School. 

It is the responsibilitv of the applicant to request that the Educational Testing 
Service forward scores on the Aptitude Test and the Advanced Test of the GRE to 
the Dean of the Gradute School. 

Hawthorne Campus 

Applicants for admission to graduate study in the Bowman Gray School of Medi- 
|cine on the Hawthorne Campus should request the Associate Dean for Biomedical 
Graduate Studies to send an application for admission form. This form should be 
filled in completely' and returned, along with a non-refundable application fee of 
S10. The address is Associate Dean for Biomedical Graduate Studies, Bowman Gray 
School of Medicine, Wake Forest L'niversity, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27 103 
((telephone 919-748-4303). 

Applicants must have each college or university which they have attended send 
official transcripts of their record to the Associate Dean for Biomedical Graduate 
Studies. 

Applicants must request letters of evaluation from three persons by listing them on 
the application. Forms are sent by the School of Medicine directly to the instructors. 

It is the responsibility of the applicant to request that the Educational Testing 
Service forward scores on the Aptitude Test and the Advanced Test of the GRE to 
the Associate Dean for Biomedical Graduate Studies. 

GRADUATE STUDENTS APPLYING TO MEDICAL SCHOOL 

A student enrolled in a program of study in the Graduate School is eligible to make 
application for admission to the School of Medicine. If selected, the student must 
satisfactorily complete all requirements for the graduate degree bv June 1 preceding 



16 



the date of matriculation in the medical school class to which he or she has beer 
admitted. A student who voluntarily withdraws from a program of study in the 
Graduate School may make application for admission to the medical school provid- 
ing one year will have elapsed from the time of withdrawal. A regularly enrolled 
medical student may withdraw temporarily from medical school to pursue a course 
of study leading to a graduate degree. 



CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 



Full-Time Status. A student who devotes full-time to a graduate program as outlined 
by his or her faculty committee and is in full-time geographic residence with a 
minimum of twelve semester hours of course work including thesis research is 
considered a full-time student. 

Part-Time Status. A student registered for less than the above amount of course 
work is considered a part-time student. 

TUITION AND FEES 

Statements concerning expenses should not be regarded as forming an irrevocable 
contract between the student and the University. The costs of instruction and other 
services outlined herein are those in effect on the date of publication of this bulletin, 
and the University reserves the right to change without notice the cost of instruction 
and other services at any time. 

During both the academic year and the summer session, graduate students en- J 
rolled on either campus on a full-time basis may take courses on the other campus ■ 
without additional tuition. 

Reynolda Campus 

An admission deposit of $55, which subsequently serves as a graduation fee, is- 
required to complete the admission of all who wish to studv toward a graduate ; 
degree. 

The following charges apply on the Reynolda Campus during the academic year: | 
students enrolled for twelve or more semester hours or the equivalent — $2,350 per 
semester; students enrolled for fewer than twelve semester hours or the equivalent — 
$155 per semester hour. 

During the academic year, a one-half tuition concession is granted to full-time 
faculty and other eligible staff members in all schools and divisions of the University 
and to the spouses of full-time faculty members for part-time study in the Graduate 
School. Wake Forest University also grants a one-half tuition rate for educators 
employed full-time in North Carolina public schools or state-approved non-public 
schools. These concessions do not apply to study in the schools of law, medicine, and 
management. 

Graduate students enrolled for full-time residence credit are entitled to full 
privileges regarding libraries, laboratories, athletic contests, student publications, 
the College Union, the University Theatre, the Artists Series, and the Health Service. 
Part-time students are entitled, after paying tuition, to the use of the libraries and 



. 



laboratories but not to the other privileges mentioned above. They may, however, 
secure admission to athletic events and concerts and the other privileges listed above 
by paving an activity fee of $70 per semester. 

The fee to audit a class is S20 per credit hour, with $60 the maximum charge per 
course. Tuition for the summer session is S60 per credit hour. 

A graduation and thesis binding fee of S55 is charged those who receive degrees. 
This fee covers the binding of five copies of the thesis or dissertation. Additional 
copies may be bound for $5 each. Doctoral candidates pay S30 to have abstracts of 
their dissertations published in Dissertation Abstracts International. 

Students not enrolled in classes but using University facilities or faculty time for 
such projects as the completion of a thesis are required to register and pav a graduate 
student fee of $30 per semester or $15 for each term of the summer session. 

During the academic year, all students, full- and part-time, receive tuition refunds 
according to the following schedule. This policy applies to students dropping courses 
as well as to those withdrawing. Withdrawals must be official and students must turn 
in their identification cards before claiming refunds. 

Number of Weeks Percentage of Total Tuition 

Attendance* to be Refunded** 

1 Total Tuition 

2 757c 

3 50% 

4 25% 



Hawthorne Campus 

Tuition is $4,700 per year for full-time study and is payable in installments of 
82,250, $2,250, and S200 at the beginning of each semester and the summer session. 

A full-time student may register to audit courses without pavment of additional 
tuition. Permission of the instructor is required. Part-time study is charged at the rate 
of $155 per semester hour. 

A graduation fee of $25 is payable prior to graduation. A fee of $30 is required for 
publication of abstracts of doctoral dissertations in Dissertation Abstracts International. 

HOUSING SERVICES 
Reynolda Campus 

The Graduate School does not require that students live in University housing. 
Most students make their own arrangements for housing off-campus. The Housing 
Office serves as an information center for individuals who wish to advertise rooms, 
apartments, and houses for rent or sale. It also provides a place for students to list 
information if they are interested in finding a roommate to share expenses. Off- 
campus facilities are not screened. The University serves onlv as an information 



*Countmg from the first day of registration; fractions of a week to count as a full week. 
**The $55 admission fee is not refunded. 



source and does not assume responsibility for placement, lease agreements, 01 
landlord-tenant relations. 

University-owned efficiency apartments that are available to graduate students arei 
described below. Graduate students who live in University housing are expected tc 
follow the regulations and conditions governing occupancy as stated in the lease oil 
contract agreement. 

Married Student Efficiency Units. Forty-six efficiency apartments are located on the 
northwest corner of the Reynolda Campus and are available to graduate and under ! 
graduate married couples. Each apartment has three small rooms, one of which' 
includes an efficiency kitchen. Assignments are based on the date applications are| 
received and on the needs of the University. 

Single Graduate Student Efficiency Units. Ten efficiency units identical to those' 
described above are available to accomodate two single students each. The single^ 
graduate student apartments are furnished with standard residence hall items! 
There are no residence hall facilities for graduate students. Assignments are based 1 
on the date of application. 

It is advisable to make housing arrangements as early as possible. Further informa-, 
tion and applications are available from the Director of Housing, Wake Forest 
University, 7342 Reynolda Station, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109 (919-761-1 
5663). 

Hawthorne Campus 

Students are expected to secure their own accommodations. Thev are eligible ftf 
the above-mentioned facilities on a space-available basis only. 

FOOD SERVICES 
Reynolda Campus 

A cafeteria, fast-food service, and table service dining room are located in 
Reynolda Hall on the Reynolda Campus. Meals may be purchased individually oi 
under an optional board plan. The approximate yearly cost individually is $800- 
$1 100. For additional information write ARA Food Service Company. 7393 Reynol- 
da Station, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109. 

HEALTH SERVICES 
Reynolda Campus 

Graduate students are entitled to the services of the University Health Service. A\ 
personal health history questionnaire, physical examination, and minimal lab worl 
are required prior to admission to the University. These forms are mailed to the 
student at the time of acceptance. 

The Health Service maintains an outpatient clinic which provides normal primar) 
care services. A laboratory facility and a limited number of pharmaceuticals are 
maintained in the clinic. X-ray facilities are not available on campus; specialisi 
consultations are obtained through private practitioners in Winston-Salem. A six- 
bed hospital adjoins the clinic area and is staffed by the Health Service staff. 



19 



Students are encouraged to obtain the group hospitalization coverage available to 
all students. Minimal charges are made for certain supplies, laboratory work, medica- 
tions, and hospitalization on campus; there is no charge for physician or physician 
Assistant or nursing personnel services on campus. The Health Service works closely 
(vith the Center for Psychological Services. Medical information and records are 
-egarded as confidential, as in am other doctor/patient relationship. 

Hawthorne Campus 

The Student Health Program is conducted by the Department of Family and 
Community Medicine and is designed to provide continuing and comprehensive 
care of the graduate student officially enrolled in the medical school and paving full 
uition. Initial history and physical examination, urinalysis, and hemogram are 
Required at the beginning of the first year of enrollment, with the option of annuai 
bhysical examinations thereafter. Routine immunizations are given as indicated. 
i Members of the faculty of the Department of Family and Community Medicine 
jierve as student health physicians. The student health clinic is open Monday through 
[Friday, with hours by appointment, for the care of minor illness. Student health 
physicians are available for emergencies twenty-four hours a day through an answer- 
ing service. Counseling is also available, and a maximum of five counseling sessions 
Will be provided without charge. 

In addition to professional services by physicians and consultants, the following 
expenses for ambulatory care are borne by the Student Health Service: diagnostic 
! ind therapeutic hematology, microbiology, clinical chemistry, X-ray and electrocar- 
diogram, and medications in common use for a limited period. Not included are costs 
or dilations, preparations for desensitization, ambulance service, braces and other 
,;urgical appliances, dental care, spectacles, eye refractions, and other special di- 
agnostic or therapeutic equipment. 

j Consultations and/or specialist care are provided when indicated. The costs of 
hospitalization (not professional care) are the responsibility of the student. Hospita- 
lization insurance is mandatory; a group hospitalization policy is available to stu- 
dents. 

" Members of the student's family are not included in this service; students are 
;xpected to make individual arrangements for their dependents. Faculty members 
erving as Student Health physicians advise students when requested. 

VEHICLE REGISTRATION 

! All students residing or operating a vehicle on the Reynolda Campus (including all 
Student and Faculty Apartments, Reynolda Gardens, and the Graylyn Estate) must 
register vehicles they are operating day or night whether or not owned by the 
)perator. Students enrolled in two or fewer courses, or less than twelve credits, 
including audit and thesis credit, may register vehicles for a reduced fee. 
i Hawthorne Campus students have no automobile registration requirements or 
ipecial parking privileges at the Medical Center. Those who take two or fewer classes, 
i>r less than twelve credits which meet on the Reynolda Campus, including audit and 
hesis credit, may register their vehicles for a reduced fee. 



20 



All vehicle registrations must be completed within twenty-four hours from the 
time the vehicle is first brought to campus. Vehicles are registered at the University 
Public Safety Office on the Reynolda Campus. Proof of ownership must be presented 
when applying for vehicle registration. 



i 



I 



EDUCATIONAL PLANNING AND PLACEMENT 

A full range of counseling and placement services is offered bv the Office for 
Educational Planning and Placement. Graduate students seeking full-time employ- 
ment after finishing their degrees are encouraged to consult the office early in their 
final year of study. 

The Office for Educational Planning and Placement also assists students and 
student spouses in locating part-time employment either on-campus or off. A max- 
imum of fifteen hours of work per week is suggested for full-time graduate students. 
Students are encouraged to consult the office (Revnolda Hall 7, 761-5246) for -J 
further information about job opportunities. 



FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 
Reynolda Campus 

For 1982-83, thirty-six scholarships at $4,700 each have been established, thirty 
fellowships at $6,800 each, and forty-one assistantships at $9,350 each ($9,550 for the I 
second year). The scholarships and the fellowships are non-service educational 
grants. Holders of all grants pay full tuition of $2,350 per semester. An assistantship 
consists of an educational grant of $6,800 plus compensation for work, normally in a 
science laboratory, in the amount of $2,550 ($2,750 for the second vear). Assistants 
work from twelve to fifteen hours per week and carry approximatelv three-fourths of 
a normal load of courses. 

Assistantships are potentiallv renewable, but the total number of years a student 
working toward the master's degree may receive support may not exceed two. 
Application for financial assistance forms, application for admission forms, and all 
supporting data should be submitted by March 1 . Grants are awarded bv April 1 and 
are to be accepted or declined by April 15. 

In addition to the above grants, twenty full-tuition scholarships and a small 
number of research grants have been established for the summer session. Applica- 
tions for summer assistance should be submitted bv April 15. All correspondence 
regarding Reynolda Campus grants and admissions should be addressed to the Dean 
of the Graduate School, Wake Forest University, 7487 Revnolda Station, Winston- 
Salem, North Carolina 27109. 

Graduate students interested in the National Direct Student Loan program or the 
Guaranteed (Insured) Student Loan program should request information from the 
Office of Financial Aid, Wake Forest University, 7305 Revnolda Station, Winston- 
Salem, North Carolina 27109. 

Unclassified (non-degree-seeking) students are not eligible for financial aid. 



Hawthorne Campus 

Financial support for students is provided from various sources, including 
leaching assistantships, fellowships and tuition scholarships. In addition, many stu- 
dents earn compensation by working as technicians in research. All assistantships and 
ellowships include tuition scholarships. 

The Hillory M. Wilder Fund, established through bequests of the late Celeste W. 

ake and Kenneth W. Blake, provides scholarships or fellowships to aid capable, 
parnest men and women who are residents of North Carolina and in need of financial 
assistance to pursue study for the medical profession or medical research. 

The Norman M. Sulkin Scholarship Fund provides scholarship assistance to stu- 
dents in a neuroanatomy program leading to the Ph.D. degree in anatomy. 



GRADING 

Records of progress are kept by this institution on veteran and non-veteran 
students alike. Progress records are furnished the students, veteran and non-veteran 
flike, at the end of each scheduled school term. 

For all courses carrying graduate credit there are three passing grades — A 
excellent), B (good), C (low pass) — and one failing grade, F. An A has the grade 
point value of three for each semester hour of credit involved, a B the value of two, 
<ind a C the value of one. 

The grade of I (incomplete) is assigned if an emergency prevents a student from 
:ompleting the work of a course by the regular time for reporting grades to the 
Registrar or the Associate Dean for Biomedical Graduate Studies. Grades of I must 
pe removed within one calendar year after the completion of the course or before the 
jubmission of the thesis, whichever comes first. After one year an unresolved I 
iutomatically becomes an F. In no case is a graduate degree awarded to a student who 
las an I on record. 

Minimum Grade Requirements. A student whose cumulative grade point average falls 
below 1.5 is required to withdraw from the Graduate School at the close of the 
;emester in which this condition occurs. The grade point average is obtained by 
■lividing the total number of grade points earned by the total number of hours 
ttempted for a grade, including hours for courses in which the grade is F. Thesis 
redit does not enter into the GPA. 

Individual departments may require a higher grade point average than 1.5 for 
ontinuing. If there is such a requirement it is stated with the departmental listings 
inder Courses of Instruction. Students may also be asked to withdraw for failure to 
nake satisfactory progress in research. 

i The minimum grade point average required for graduation with the master's 
legree is 2.0. Ph.D. candidates must have a B average in graduate courses at the time 
>f both the qualifying and the final examinations. 

, Dropping a Course. With the approval of the Dean of the Graduate School or the 
Associate Dean for Biomedical Graduate Studies and the department concerned, a 
tudent may drop a course during the first six weeks of a semester, or the equivalent 



22 



period during a summer term, without penalty. The official record is Drop, followed 
by the date. 

A student who is permitted to drop a course after six weeks is assigned a Drop (with 
the date) if he or she is doing passing work, or an F if the work is below passing level. 
Courses marked Drop are not counted in determining the grade point average. 
Course change forms can be obtained in the Office of the Dean of the Graduate 1 
School. 

Withdrawal from the University. During the first six weeks of a semester, a student! 
may withdraw from the University without having a grade recorded for courses in 
progress. Withdrawal procedures should be initiated in the Office of the Dean of the 1 
Graduate School or the Associate Dean for Biomedical Graduate Studies. After six : 
weeks, students who withdraw with permission are assigned progress report grades 
of WP in courses in which they are doing passing work at the time of withdrawal and 
WF in courses in which their work is below passing level. These grades, which appear 
on the record as WD (withdrawal from the University), are not counted in credit 
hours or grade point totals, but are considered if the student applies for readmission. 
A student who withdraws without the approval of the Dean of the Graduate School orl 
the Associate Dean for Biomedical Graduate Studies and the department concerned 
is assigned grades of F for all courses in progress. 

Grades Assigned: 

A — Excellent 
B — Good 
C — Low pass 

F — Failed (counted as hours attempted) 
I — Incomplete (becomes passing grade or F) 
Drop — Official drop (not counted as hours attempted) 

Withdrew passing (not counted as hours attempted) 
Withdrew failing (not counted as hours attempted) 

— Satisfactory progress on thesis research (credit assigned when thesis accepted) 

— Unsatisfactory progress on thesis research 



WP 

WF 
S 
U 




'28 

Requirements for Degrees 

Degrees Offered 

The Graduate School offers graduate programs leading to the Master of Arts, 
Master of Arts in Education, Master of Science, and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. 
.For a description of the programs of the various departments see Courses of Instruc- 
tion. "Instructions for the Preparation of Theses" can be obtained in the Graduate 
Office. All candidates who receive graduate degrees in August, December, or May 
are expected to attend the May Commencement of that school year unless excused by 
he Dean of the Graduate School or his deputy, 

Foreign Language 

Some degree programs require a reading examination in a modern foreign lan- 
guage — usually French, German, Russian, or Spanish. Students who wish to im- 
prove their knowledge of a language may audit undergraduate classes. Faculty 
members of the language departments assist in the selection of appropriate courses. 
For full-time students there is no additional charge for auditing. 
! Students whose programs of study include a foreign language requirement nor- 
mally meet it by submitting satisfactory scores on the Graduate School Foreign 
Language Tests administered by the Educational Testing Service. The tests are given 
on previously announced dates at the University and at many other places. Testing 
dates at Wake Forest are in October and April. Arrangements to take the tests may be 
made in the Office of the Dean of the Graduate School during registration for the fall 
and spring semesters. 

Admission to Candidacy 

Admission to graduate standing does not necessarily commit the student or the 
University to a program of study leading to a graduate degree. Students who wish to 
pecome candidates for degrees must file applications for candidacy with the Dean of 
he Graduate School or the Associate Dean for Biomedical Graduate Studies. Except 
br doctoral candidates, this may be done after the student has completed one 
iemester of graduate work and met the foreign language or special skill require- 
rients. It must be done at least three months before the graduate degree is conferred. 

Requirements for the Master of Arts Degree 

Programs of study leading to the Master of Arts degree are offered in the depart- 
rients of anthropology, biology, English, history, mathematics, physical education, 
ssychology, religion, and speech communication and theatre arts. The degree is 
warded to candidates who complete a minimum of twenty-four semester hours of 
:ourse work with an average grade of B or above on all courses attempted, meet the 
oreign language or special skills requirements, and write an acceptable thesis for 
vhich six hours of credit toward the thirty required for graduation are allotted. 



24 

Students may earn additional credit for thesis research, but such hours may not b 
substituted for the twenty-four hours of course work required. 

Residence Requirements. The minimum residence requirement is one academic yea 
or three summer sessions. In practice, most students in the arts require at least 
summer session in addition to the academic year, and most science students requir 
two years. At present only the departments of English and history offer programs i: 
which degrees may be earned by summer study alone. In all cases, work for th, 
degree must be completed within six calendar years of the date of initial enrollmen 
in the Graduate School. 

Course Requirements. At least twelve of the twenty-four hours in course work (nc 
counting thesis research) required for the degree must be in courses numbered 40 
or above. The remaining twelve hours may be in either 300-level or 400-level course; 
Credit is allowed for as many as six hours of graduate work transferred from anothe 
institution, but the minimum residence requirement is not thereby reduced. 

Thesis Requirement. Six of the thirty hours required for the M.A. degree are allotte. 
for the thesis.* The examining committee which determines whether or not a thesis i 
approved is appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School and consists of at leas 
three members selected from the graduate faculty. The examination is oral am 
includes both the thesis and the student's field of specialization. Although six seme; 
ter hours of credit are recorded when a thesis is approved, no letter grade other thai 
S or U is ever assigned for the courses entitled Thesis Research. If a U is assigned, th 
course must be repeated and an S earned before a degree can be awarded. 

Foreign Language and Special Skills Requirement. This general requirement may b 
met by either a reading knowledge of one foreign language or competencv in a: 
appropriate skill such as statistics or computer programming and operation. Th 
specific language or skill is determined by the department in which the student i 
enrolled and reflects the needs of the student for a research tool. (See each depart; 
ment's statement concerning its requirements.) 

Requirements for the Master of Arts 
in Education Degree 

Graduate work in education is offered leading to the Master of Arts in Educatio' 
degree. The minimum residence requirement is one academic year or three summe : 
sessions. Students enrolled on a part-time basis may require a longer period t 
complete degree requirements. The degree may be earned in teaching, counseling 
educational foundations, or school psychology. The degree is awarded to candidate 
who successfully complete the following requirements within six calendar years 
the date of initial enrollment in the Graduate School: 

— Demonstrate research competence by passing the required course in Educatio 
al Research. 



*Theses are written wider the supervision of the student's graduate committee (an adviser a 
second reader). The department chairman or a deputy appoints the student's committee before //! 
end of the first semester the student is in residence and lists the names of the committee members a 
the schedule card for the second semester. The student should confer with the chairrm 
concerning the membership of the committee. 



25 

— Complete an approved program with a minimum of thirty semester hours, or 
more if required in a specific program, with an overall average grade of at least B on 
all courses attempted. The course requirements in any program must be completed 
in courses numbered 300 or above, with at least half of the total number of required 
hours (exclusive of those for the thesis or research report) in courses numbered 400 
t>r above. 

i —Write a thesis (or optionally, in the counselor's program, a research report), be 
examined on it, and have it approved by the final examination committee. The 
examination is oral and includes both the thesis and the student's field of specializa- 
tion. 

I In addition to qualifying for admission to the Graduate School, candidates for the 
M.A. in Education degree seeking North Carolina certification must, where appro- 
priate for the program in question, possess or be qualified for a North Carolina Class 
A teacher's certificate or its equivalent. 

Requirements for the Master of Science Degree 

The Master of Science degree is offered on the Reynolda Campus by the depart- 
ments of chemistry and physics. In the Bowman Gray School of Medicine it is offered 
py the departments of anatomy, anesthesia, biochemistry, comparative medicine, 
microbiology and immunology, and physiology and pharmacology, and by the 
Program in Comparative and Experimental Pathology. 

i The Master of Science degree in Medical Sciences is offered to qualified students, 
including medical students and persons holding the M.D., D.V.M., or D.D.S. de- 
grees. This graduate program may be carried out in any department or section of the 
Medical school with the approval of the Committee on Biomedical Graduate Studies. 
By virtue of extension into the clinical areas of medicine, the scope of the graduate 
iivision is broadened and provides the medical student or young clinician with a 
jackground for further work in academic medicine. 

Residence Requirement. In general, a minimum of twelve months of full-time work oi- 
ls equivalent in residence is required for the master's degree. For students who have 
already completed a part of their graduate work, appropriate adjustment of the 
esidence requirement can be made by the Graduate Council. The total allowable 
,ime for completion of the degree must not exceed four years. 
^ Course Requirements. A Master of Science degree candidate must have a minimum 
j>f thirty semester hours of graduate credit. This minimum requirement can include 
io more than six hours of research. 

I Students who have completed at least one year of medical study in the Bowman 
jiray School of Medicine can offer certain courses in the medical curriculum for 
redit. Students desiring to transfer from another graduate school are not allowed 
;Hore than six semester hours of credit for previous course work, except in unusual 
ases and upon approval of the Graduate Council. 

j The course of study consisting of classes, seminars, and research is compiled by a 
(roup including the student, the student's adviser, and the chairman of the depart- 
ment of the major field of interest. It is recommended that when possible such 
'rograms include courses in fields other than that of major interest. At least twelve 



26 



semester hours must consist of graduate courses exclusive of courses included in th 
medical curriculum or 300-level courses on the Reynolda Campus. Sixteen hours c 
lectures, conferences, or examinations, or thirty-two hours of laboratory work ai 
equivalent to one semester hour of credit. 

Thesis Requirement. The thesis embodies the results of the student's research. A 
original and four carbon copies or photoduplicates of the thesis approved by thl 
department of the major must be submitted to the Committee on Biomedical Grad 
ate Studies or the Dean of the Graduate School two weeks before the examinatio 
and at least four weeks before graduation. Three copies of the thesis remain th 
property of the University. An abstract of approximatelv 200 words is also required 

Foreign Language and Special Skills Requirement. Candidates for the M.S. degree ma' 
be required to have a reading knowledge of a pertinent foreign language or demor 
strate competence in a special skill such as computer programming or the use ( 
statistics. The specific language or skill is determined by the student's major depar 
ment. The language requirement, if any, is normally met by making a satisfactory 
score on the Graduate School Foreign Language Test. Arrangements to take the te: 
may be made in the Office of the Dean of the Graduate School. In those department 
in which a skill is substituted for a foreign language, the department determines th 
method by which the requirement is met. (See each department's statement concert 
ing its requirements). 

Admission to Degree Candidacy. A student is admitted to degree candidacy by th; 
Dean of the Graduate School or the Associate Dean for Biomedical Graduate Studie 
after recommendation by the major department. The student must have met sati;! 
factorily the foreign languages and special skills requirement and is expected tl 
complete the master's degree requirements by one additional semester's work. 

Final Examination. Each candidate for the M.S. degree is examined bv a panel c 1 
four members of the faculty appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School or th 
Associate Dean for Biomedical Graduate Studies and including the student's depar 1 
ment chairman or a deputy, the adviser, a person outside the department who hi 
knowledge in the area of the thesis and, for Hawthorne Campus students, a membe 
of the Committee on Biomedical Graduate Studies, other than a representative of th' 
major department, who acts as chairman. The examination covers the thesis an 
knowledge in related areas and is conducted at least ten days prior to graduation. J 
student mav be reexamined onlv once. 



Requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy Degree 



Programs of studv leading to the Doctor of Philosophv degree are offered in tf 
departments of anatomy, biochemistrv, biology, chemistry, microbiology and inj 
munologv, physiology and pharmacology, andjointly by the departments of compa 
ative medicine and pathology through the Program in Comparative and E:j 
perimental Pathology. 

Residence Requirement. A minimum of three years of full-time study, of which ;j 
least two must be in full-time residence at the University, is required beyond tf; 
bachelor's degree. The total allowable time for completion of the degree must n<j 
exceed seven years. 



: 



Course Requirements and Advisory Committee. Specific course requirements are not 
described. Course work is arranged by the student's advisory committee with the 
jpproval of the departmental graduate committee to provide mastery of appropriate 
fields of concentration. The advisory committee is appointed by the chairman of the 
jepartment and consists of the student's adviser and two other members of the 
department. Teaching experience during the period of study is encouraged. 

Areas of Concentration. Candidates for the Ph.D. degree must have intensive train- 
ing in a major area of specialization. The student must also have work in at least one 
,elated area, in the same or in other departments. The course of study designed to 
jchieve these objectives is planned by the student's advisory committee and is subject 
p approval by the Graduate Council. 

Foreign Language and Special Skills Requirement. This requirement may be fulfilled 
|y demonstrating a reading knowledge of one or more foreign languages or compe- 
£ nee in one or more skills such as statistics or computer programming and opera- 

on. The specific languages and skills offered by the student are determined on an 
idividual basis by the student's major department. Language requirements are 
lormally met by making satisfactory scores on the Graduate School Foreign Lan- 
juage Tests. Arrangements to take these tests are made at the Office of the bean of 
|ie Graduate School. Each department has its own procedures for meeting special 
kills requirements. All examinations in language and skills must be successfully 
-assed prior to completing the preliminary examination. (See each department's 
liatement concerning its requirements.) 

, Preliminary Examination. This examination is conducted by the major department, 
fhe examining committee selected by the department includes at least three mem- 
prs, one of whom represents a related concentration area. A single written examina- 
jon or a series of written examinations should cover all areas of concentration and 
pllateral studies. There may also be an oral examination in which any faculty 
member invited by the examining committee may participate. Decisions as to passing 
re made by the examining committee. In case of failure, the committee can recom- 
jiend that the candidate be dropped or that reexamination be allowed no earlier 
ban six months from the date of the first examination. A student may be reexamined 
^ly once. The preliminary examination is normally given near the end of the 
ludent's second year of graduate study and must be passed at least twelve months 
irior to the date of the awarding of the degree. 

Admission to Degree Candidacy. A student is admitted to degree candidacy by the 

ean of the Graduate School or a deputy after recommendation by the chairman of 
k major department. Each candidate must have passed the preliminary examina- 
bn and met satisfactorily the foreign language and special skills requirement. 

Dissertation. Under the supervision of an advisory committee, the candidate pie- 
ces a dissertation embodying the results of investigative efforts in the field of 
mcentration. The dissertation must be submitted by the department of the major to 

e Dean of the Graduate School or a deputy at least four weeks prior to the proposed 
kte of graduation and is distributed to the examining committee at least two weeks 
More the examination. A minimum of five copies (the original and four carbon 
'■pies or photoduplicates) must be prepared. Three copies become the property of 



e Un 



lversitv. 



28 



At the time the dissertation is submitted, an abstract of 600 words or less must 1 
submitted in duplicate for publication in Dissertation Abstracts International. A noi 
refundable dissertation fee of |30 covers the cost of this service. Other agencies < 
publication are encouraged, but such publication does notremove the requiremei 
for submission of the abstract to Dissertation Abstracts International. 

Final Examination. A final examination covering the student's major field of coi 
centration and the dissertation is held no later than ten days before graduation. Tt 
examining panel appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School or a deputy consisj 
of the following five members of the Graduate faculty: the chairman of the majti 
department or a faculty member chosen by the chairman, the student's advise 
another member of the major department, a representative of a related area, and! 
member from outside the major department who represents the Graduate Counc 
and who serves as chairman. Other faculty members may attend the final examin 
don and participate in the questioning. In case of failure, the panel may recommen 
that the candidate be dropped or that reexamination be allowed no earlier than sj 
months from the date of the first examination. A student mav be reexamined on, 
once. Two weeks prior to the final examination, the candidate must have prepare 
100 copies of his or her doctoral program to be submitted to the Dean of tr' 
Graduate School or a deputy for distribution. 




Manson Meads, vice president for health affairs, and Richard Janeway, dean of | 
Bowman Gray School of Medicine 






29 

Courses of Instruction 

Odd-numbered courses are normally taught in the fall and even-numbered courses in the 
pring. Exceptions are noted after the course descriptions. Semester hours of credit are shown by 
lumerals immediately after the course title — for example, (3) or (3 , 3). Some laboratory courses 
lave numerals after the course descriptions, showing hours of recitation and laboratoty per week 
—for example, (2-4). The symbols P — and C — followed by course numbers or titles are used to 
how prerequisites and corequisites in the department. Many entries show the name of the 
rrofessor who teaches the course. 

Anatomy 

Hawthorne Campus 

W. Keith O'Steen, Chairman 

Professors Walter J. Bo, W. Keith O'Steen 

Associate Professors David M. Biddulph, Wayne A. Krueger 

Charles E. McCreight, Inglis J. Miller Jr., James E. Turner 

Assistant Professors Paul A. Berberian, Craig K. Henkel, P. Kevin Rudeen, 

Michael Tytell 

The Department of Anatomy offers a graduate program leading to the Ph.D. 
legree for students interested in research in biologic structure and function and in 
iasic medical sciences. 

Areas of research competency demonstrated by members of the faculty include 
irostaglandin modulation of intracellular lipid in experimental arteriosclerosis; 
lormonal influences on retinal neurons, cell death and aging; reflex pathways in the 
rainstem; endocrinology (thyroid and parathyroid, pituitary, female and male 
eproduction); neurochemistry (pineal gland and hypothalamic neuroendocrinolo- 
y); growth factors and nervous system regeneration; and taste mechanisms. Newly 
emodeled facilities support study and research in these areas. 

Minor work is available in the fields of biochemistry, microbiologv, immunology, 
hysiology, pathology, and radiation biology. Graduate students may take additional 
ourses at the Reynolda Campus. 

Each student is required to obtain experience in teaching by assisting in depart- 
tental courses. 

The foreign language and special skills requirement for the Ph.D. degree may be 
let by either a reading knowledge of a foreign language or competence in one or 
tore special skills as determined by the student's advisory committee. 

Applicants applying for graduate work should have satisfactory prerequisite prep- 
ration in biology, including chordate or vertebrate anatomy; in chemistry, including 
lorganic and organic chemistry; in college physics and mathematics. Students must 
Iso present satisfactory scores on the Graduate Record Examinations. 

The M.S. was first offered in 1941, the Ph.D. in 1961. 

1. Gross Anatomy. (9) A systematic dissection of the human body is made under 
uidance of the staff. Frequent discussion periods are held in which the laboratory 
ork is reviewed and correlated. A series of lectures and discussions of normal 



30 



radiographic anatomy and principles of ultrasound is integrated with the cours 
work. P — Three semesters of biology. 

303. Medical Embryology. ( 1 ) This course is an introduction to the major concept 
of human embryonic and fetal development, including discussions of major coi 
genital abnormalities. P — Permission of instructor. 

305. Microanatomy I — Cells and Tissues. (3) A lecture and laboratory course whic 
includes the microscopic, histochemical, and ultrastructural characteristics of cell 
intercellular substances, and the major tissues of the body with emphasis placed o 
functional correlations. 

306. Microanatomy II — Organ Systems. (3) A lecture and laboratory course whic 
includes the microscopic structure of the major organ systems of the body wit 
emphasis placed on functional correlations. (2-2) P — 305. 

400. Special Topics in Developmental Biology. (2) This course deals with selecte 
current topics in the field of developmental biology. The course includes seminar 
discussions, and reading assignments in the areas of interest. P — Permission c 
instructor. 

401, 402. Special Topics in Gross Anatomy. (1 or 2, 1 or 2) Special dissection < 

selected structures, as well as discussions, seminars, and reading assignments 
special areas of gross anatomy. P — Gross Anatomy. 

403, 404. Special Topics in Histology. (1 or 2, 1 or 2) Special preparations an 
discussions, seminars, and reading assignments in selected areas of histology. P- 
Permission of instructor. 

405, 406. Special Topics in Neuroanatomy. (1 or 2, 1 or 2) Special preparation 
reading, and discussions of selected topics dealing with the anatomy, physiology, an 
chemistry of the nervous system. P — 412. 

407. Methods in Histological Research. (3) This course presents to the gradual 
student current concepts of anatomical research, including theoretical consider; 
tions of a variety of methods such as histochemistry, autoradiography, crvostat 
methods, and electron microscopic methods. P — Permission of instructor. 

408. Methods in Biological Research. (3) Concepts used bv members of the depar 
mental staff in their own research are considered in both theoretical and practic 
aspects. Autoradiography, endocrinological methods, basic embryonic grafting an 
tissue culture, selected biochemical assay methods, and neurobiological procedunj 
are considered. P — 407 or equivalent and permission of instructor. 

410. Cell Biology. (3) Historical and current concepts relating to cell theory, e:| 
perimental approaches to the study of cells and knowledge of cellular componen 
are discussed in detail. The cell surface, nucleus and cellular organelles are presente 
in relation to membrane turnover, cell division, cellular growth and energetics, ; 
well as cell motility and regulation. Secretion and the cellular activities of muscle an 
nerve also are emphasized. P — 305 and Biochemistry 391 or 405 or equivalent an 
permission of instructor. 

412. Neuroanatomy. (3) Lecture and laboratory exercises on the structure an 




Graduate students have access to open stacks in the Z. Smith Reynolds lib 



rary. 



32 

function of the human central nervous system. Laboratory includes gross dissectior 
microscopic examination and programmed instruction. Research information will b 
provided in conferences to supplement lecture and laboratory material. P- 
Permission of instructor. 

414. Endocrinology of the Female Reproductive System. (4) A lecture and labors 
tory course designed to present concepts of the regulation of ovarian hormones an4 
their effects on the morphology, physiology-, and biochemistry of target tissues. (2-4f 
P — Permission of instructor. 

415. Sensory Neurobiology. (3) (One hour major credit allowed for anatomy stu 
dents.) See Interdisciplinary Courses. 

416. Human Developmental Anatomy. (2) This course presents advanced concept] 
in human development. Both fetal dissections and an in-depth coverage of th 
original literature on selected topics are included. P — Permission of instructor. 
419, 420. Seminar. (1, 1) Research reports presented by students, faculty, am 
individuals from other departments or institutions. The seminar topic changes eacf 
semester. 

425, 426. Research. Closelv supervised research in various topics in anatomy, 
eluding research in preparation for the doctoral dissertation. 



in 



Anesthesia 

Hawthorne Campus 

Thomas H. Irving, Chairman 

Professor Thomas H. Irving 

Assistant Professors Edward H. Stullken, Raymond C. Roy 

The Department of Anesthesia offers a program leading to the Master of Science 
degree in Anesthesia and designed to prepare students for careers in the teaching o 
anesthesia and scientific investigation in this field. The Master of Science degree i 
offered to qualified students holding both the baccalaureate degree and a graduation 
certificate from an accredited school of nurse anesthesia or accredited residence 
program. Applicants are required to submit scores on the Graduate Record Ex) 
animations and should have maintained a B average in undergraduate studies. Othe 
requirements are in accordance with those prescribed bv this bulletin. 

A Master of Science candidate must have a miniumum of thirty hours of graduat. 
credit, twelve of which will consist of graduate courses numbered 400 or above. Th< 
course of study consists of classes and seminars selected bv the student and his or he{ 
adviser. A thesis is not required for this degree but as a partial substitute a librar 
research paper will be necessary for the completion of the terminal semester o 
Anesthesia 403, 404. Candidates need not have a foreign language skill but may b< 
required to demonstrate competence in a special skill such as computer program 
ming or the use of statistics. Before admission to degree candidacy bv the Associafc 
Dean for Biomedical Graduate Studies, the candidate shall have exhibited proficien 
cy in the administration of anesthesia bv having obtained a certified registered nursJ 
anesthetist certificate or an anesthesia residency completion certificate. 



33 

| Students are expected to obtain a broad background in biochemistry, physiology, 
rid pharmacology (Biochemistry 405, Physiology 392, and Pharmacology 301). The 
f udent is expected to take at least seven hours in course work to be chosen from 400 

vel courses offered by the Departments of Education and Pharmacology. 

This program began in 1980. 

01. Physicochemical Principles in Anesthesia. (3) This course treats in depth the 
hysiology and mechanics of anesthesia and associated monitoring equipment, 
mphasis is on the understanding of the physics involved in the design and operation 
f anesthetic and monitoring equipment. There is an introduction to computers and 
complete review of the pharmacology and physiology of drugs used in anesthetic 
ractice. 

1)3, 404. Seminar. ( 1 , 1 ) A weekly seminar in anesthesia including special anesthetic 
'•chniques, pharmacology, and physiology for the care of patients undergoing 
lrgery, and information on a variety of specialized surgical diciplines. 

35, 406. Advanced Topics in Anesthesia. (1, 1) An advanced lecture and student 
irticipation course dealing with areas of new knowledge in the art and science of 

Sesthesia. 
1, 492. Research in Anesthesia. (Credit to be arranged.) 

Anthropology 

Reynolda Campus 

Stanton K. Tefft, Chairman 

Professors Eugene Pendleton Banks, Stanton K. Tefft 

Associate Professors David K. Evans, J. Ned Woodall 

Assistant Professor David S. Weaver 

Adjunct Assistant Professor Jay R. Kaplan 

The Department of Anthropology offers a program leading to the M.A. degree in 
ithropology. The program requires the completion of thirty hours of work, of 
nch six hours are allotted for thesis research. Also required is a demonstrable 
>mpetence in a special skill or a foreign language. The special skill must be appli- 
!ble to the student's research interests. At least twelve hours (not counting thesis 
search) must be in courses numbered above 400, including 452 (Anthropological 
neory) and either 461 (Methods in Cultural Anthropology), 465 (Methods in 
oplied Anthropology), 470 (Methods in Physical Anthropology), or 472 (Methods 
i Archeology). In addition, 380 (Anthropological Statistics) is required for gradua- 
>n. Students are required to pass a comprehensive examination testing their know- 
ige in three basic subdisciplines (physical anthropology, archeology, and cultural 
ithropology) during their third semester in residence. A student must have a 
issing grade in all course work and a B average or higher for graduation and must 
[bmit a thesis and pass an examination on it. 

Thesis research normally is oriented toward archeology, physical anthropology, or 
iltural anthropology. Facilities are provided through the Museum of Man, an 
lhate of the department, where there is an active research program in archeology, 



34 

physical anthropology, and cultural anthropology as well as opportunities for train 
ing and experience in museum work. Students may participate in various contrac 
archeology programs, an internship program with the Archeology Branch of the 
North Carolina Division of Archives and History, and the study of various archeolog 
ical and ethnographic collections housed in the Museum. Research in physica 
anthropology includes paleopathology, nutrition and growth, osteology, primatolo 
gy, and human evolution. The Primate Research Facility of the Bowman Gray Schoo 
of Medicine provides additional research facilities for selected students. Research it 
cultural anthropology includes tribal and peasant studies, political anthropology 
museologv, and cultural ecology. The department's Overseas Research Center offer: 
an opportunity for field research on problems of developing nations. 

An entering student is expected to have an undergraduate degree in anthropolog; 
or a closelv related discipline, although exceptions mav be granted under specia 
circumstances. Enrollment in the program is limited to insure close student/faculf | 
contact throughout the graduate study. 

Additional information may be secured from the departmental chairman or thtl 
Dean of the Graduate School. Departmental graduate committee: Tefft (chairman)j 
Banks, Evans, Weaver, Woodall. 



FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATE STUDENTS 



305. Conflict and Change on Roatan Island (Honduras). (3) Readings and fielc 
research focusing upon the barriers and processes of sociocultural and technologica 1 
change in a heterogeneous island community. Usually offered in the summer. 

310. Museum Design and Operation. (3) The principles of museum design an< 
operation. Lectures, readings, workshops with visiting experts in the field, and f lelt 
trips to neighboring museums (possibly to Washington, D.C.). Students have ai 
opportunity to put some of the principles in practice by planning and designin; 
exhibits in the Museum of Man. 
321. The Anthropology of Art. (3) The arts (primarily visual) in folk and tribal 
cultures from comparative, structural and functional points of view. 

342. Peoples and Cultures of Latin America. (3) Ethnographic focus on the ele 
ments and processes of contemporary Latin American cultures. 

343. Anthropology and Developing Nations. (3) Analytic survey of problems facin 
emerging nations and the application of anthropological theorv in culture-chang 
programs. 

344. Medical Anthropology. (3) The impact of Western medical practices ant 
theory on non-Western cultures and anthropological contributions to the solution d 
world health problems. 

351. Physical Anthropology. (3) Introduction to biological anthropology; humaj 
biology, evolution, and variability. 

352. Laboratory Methods in Physical Anthropology. (2) Basic methods utilized b 



35 

jhysical anthropologists to gather data, such as blood grouping, measurement, 
lermatoglyphics, and dental casting. Lab) — two hours. 

153. Peoples and Cultures of Africa. (3) The ethnology and prehistory of Negro 
Africa south of the Sahara. Not offered in 1982-83. 

154. Primitive Religion. (3) The worldview and values of non-literate cultures as 
•xpressed in myths, rituals, and symbols. 

155. Language and Culture. (3) Introduction to the relations between language and 
ulture, including methods for field research. 

56. Old World Prehistory. (3) Introduction to prehistoric archeology; field and 
aboratory techniques, with a survey of world prehistory. 

■58. The American Indian. (3) Ethnology and prehistory of the American Indian. 

■59. Prehistory of North America. (3) The development of culture in North Amel- 
ia as outlined by archeological research, with an emphasis on paleoecology and 
ociocultural processes. 

60. Archeology of the Southeastern United States. (3) A study of human adapta- 
lon in the Southeast from the Pleistocene to the present, emphasizing the role of 
cological factors in determining the formal aspects of culture. 

61. Conservation Archeology. (3) A study of the laws, regulations, policies, pro- 
rams, and political processes used to conserve prehistoric and historic cultural 
esources. 

62. Human Ecology. (3) The relations between man and the inorganic and organic 
nvironments as mediated by culture; laboratory experience with aerial photogra- 
hy and other remote sensing techniques. 

64. Human Osteology. (3) A survey of human skeletal anatomy and analysis, 
mphasizing archeological and anthropological applications. 

66. Human and Non-Human Evolution. (3) Investigation of primate and human 
volution, both in anatomy and behavior. 

171. European Peasant Communities. (3) Lectures, reading, and discussion on 
elected communities and their sociocultural context, including folklore, folk art, 
kid processes of culture change. 

80. Anthropological Statistics. (3) Basic statistics, emphasizing application in 
jnthropological research. 

81, 382. Archeological Research. (3,3) The recovery of anthropological data 
irough the use of archeology, taught in the excavation and interpretation of a 
'rehistoric site. 

83, 384. Field Research in Cultural Anthropology. (3, 3) Training in techniques 
>r the study of foreign cultures, carried out in the field. 

85, 386. Special Problems Seminar. (3,3) Intensive investigation of current scien- 
fic research within the discipline, concentrating on problems of contemporary 
iterest. 



36 



387. Advanced Statistical Analysis in Anthropology. (3) Principles of multivaria 
statistical analysis and applications to anthropological problems. 

388. Senior Seminar. (3) A review of the contemporary problems in the field 
archeology and physical and cultural anthropology. 

398, 399. Independent Study. (3, 3) A reading, research, or internship cour 
designed to meet the needs and interests of selected students, to be carried out und 
the supervision of a departmental faculty member. 

FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

452. Anthropological Theory. (3) A study of the historical and conceptual develo 
ment of modern anthropological theory with emphasis on 20th century theory. Te ' 

461. Seminar: Research Methods in Cultural Anthropology. (3) The use of f| 

scientific method in cultural anthropology; a survey of methods of field work 
cultural anthropology and ethnology, with emphasis on the design of field stud: 
and techniques used in collecting and analyzing data and some field work. Ban 

465. Seminar: Research Methods in Applied Anthropology. (3) An attempt ;> 
assemble the basic cultural factors which must be understood for the success! 1 
introduction of change into newly developing nations. The impact of Westei 
technology, thought, and social organization on such societies is stressed. The coun: 
attempts to relate anthropological theory about processes of cultural change > 
practical problems of modern life. Eva|i 

470. Seminar: Research Methods in Physical Anthropology. (3) A survey of cr> 
rent research problems and methods in physical anthropology, concentrating '■: 
integrating research problems in physical anthropology with cultural anthropolo 
and archeology. WeaV' 

472. Seminar: Research Methods in Archeology. (3) A study of the literature i 
research methods in archeology, supplemented bv practice in the field and in t: 
laboratory. All phases of archeological research explored, from survey and excav 
tion to analysis and report writing. Wood I 

485, 486. Directed Reading and Research. (3, 3) Provides graduate students wi 
opportunities for reading in areas not covered by other courses or research rjt 
directly related to the thesis project. St; 

491,492. Thesis Research. (3. 3) St; 



37 

Biochemistry 

Hawthorne Campus 

Moseley Waite, Chairman 

Professors Lawrence R. DeChatelet, Edward J. Modest, Charles N. Remy, 

Cornelius F. Strittmatter, Moseley Waite 

Associate Professors Carol C. Cunningham, George J. Doellgast, 

Frank H. Hulcher, Peter B. Smith 

Research Associate Professor Robert L. Wykle 

Assistant Professors Ibrahim Z. Ades, Daniel J. Fernandes, 

Bill A. Kilpatrick, J. Wallace Parce, Michael J. Thomas, 

J. Courtland White 

, The graduate training program of the Department of Biochemistry is designed to 
jrepare students for careers of investigation and teaching in biochemistry and in 
elated sciences that involve biochemical approaches and techniques. The programs 
f study are individually planned, although all students are expected to possess 
ampetence in certain basic areas of biochemistry and related sciences. Programs 
wading to either the Ph.D. or the M.S. degree in biochemistry are offered. 
To provide a broad, firm basis for advanced work, the initial phase of the student's 
rogram generally includes the courses Biochemistry of Medicine or General Biochemis- 
N, Biochemical Techniques, Literature Seminar, and correction of any areas of deficien- 
V. Specialization and depth are provided through pertinent advanced courses in 
iochemistry, including sections of the cyclical sequence of advanced topics in bio- 
aemistry, and selected courses in other departments. The student also participates 
I the department's program of research seminars and may obtain guided teaching 
<perience. A requirement for competence in a special research skill may be included 
I the course of study if pertinent to the student's area of interest and career plans. 
; Thesis research under the supervision of a faculty member may be pursued in 
irious areas of biochemistry, including enzymology, membrane structure and func- 
t>n in excitable tissues, relation of lipid and protein metabolism and of protein-lipid 
jsociation to membrane structure and function, immunochemistry of enzymes, 
ological oxidations and bioenergetics, intermediary metabolism, biochemical con- 
ol mechanisms, biochemistry of development, molecular genetics and nucleic acid 
inction, biophysics, relations of structure to function in enzymes and other pro- 
lins, oncology, and leukocyte metabolism and function. The department has spe- 
alized equipment and facilities to support training and investigation in these areas. 
iThe M.S. degree has been offered since 1941, the Ph.D. since 1962. 

H. Biochemistry of Medicine. (7) A lecture-conference course in general bio- 
lemistry that covers the basic areas of biophysical chemistry, enzymology, metabo- 
m, molecular genetics, and the physiological chemistry of tissues and cells. This 
>urse provides the student with a broad exposure to the various areas of biochemis- 
y- P — General and organic chemistry and permission of instructor. Staff 

•0, 40 1 . Biochemistry Literature Seminar. (1,1) Presentations and discussions by 
-idents and staff members. Meets weekly. 

•2, 403. Introduction to Biochemical Research. (1-5 credit to be arranged) Con- 



38 



ferences on biochemical literature, the planning and execution of research, and tlj 
interpretation and presentation of experimental results. To put these principles ini 
practice, individualized laboratory projects are carried out under the supervision i 
staff members. Waite, SteJ 

404. Advanced Topics in Biochemistry. (2-8) An advanced lecture/conferen! 
course that considers various areas of current interest or rapid development in 
two-year cvcle (one semester each vear). Individual sections of the course may j 
taken separately for credit. (Maximum total credit 14 hours.) Topics to be covered 
1982-83 are: (a) metabolic control and development, 2 hours (Strittmatter); (I 
biochemistrv of excitable tissue, 2 hours (Smith). P — 391 or equivalent. 

405. General Biochemisty. (5) Lectures and problem sessions to provide rigoro 
and intensive treatment of general biochemical topics for graduate students. Ei 
phasis is on development of a working knowledge of biochemical material, includi: 
quantitative relationships. P — General and organic chemistry and permission 
instructor. St; 

406. Physical Biochemistry. (3) Consideration of physical and phvsiochemical cd 
cepts and their application to biochemical research. Lectures and discussions, pro 
lems and laboratorv sessions. P — General biochemistry and physical chemistry 
equivalent. Offered in odd-numbered years. PaKI 

407. Biochemical Techniques. (2) Theory and application of selected imports 
biochemical laboratory techniques. Lectures, problems, and laboratory. P or C — 3! 
405, or equivalent exposure to biochemistry. Doellgast, St; 

408. Enzymology. (2) The nature of enzymes, enzyme kinetics, and mechanisms 
action, and of methods employed in enzyme studies. Lectures, discussions, a 
problems. P — General biochemistry or equivalent. Offered in even-numbered years\ 

Cunningh; 

410. Biochemistry and Function of Blood Components. (3) The course offj 
intensive exposure to the morphology, biochemistry, and function of the varid 
components of human blood. Lectures concentrate on the individual componer' 
including erythrocytes, leukocytes, platelets, and humoral factors such as the co 1 
plement cascade and the clotting mechanism. Emphasis on normal cellular metal- 
lism and aberrations in metabolism in various disease states. P — General biocherr 
try or permission of instructor. Offered in odd-numbered years. DeChatet 

412. Immunochemistry. (2) Structures of antibodies and their synthesis, the strd 
ture of antigenic determinants, complement, qualitative and quantitative techniqu. 
The course attempts to provide a working knowledge of immunochemistry as a baj 
research tool in biochemistry and to introduce the student to the structural comjr 
nents of antibodies and antigens which make it possible to develop such a divel 
repertoire of specific antibodies during the immune response. P — 391, gena 
biochemistry or equivalent. Offered in even-numbered years. Doellg* 

414. Instrumental Techniques. (3) This course will present theory and technl 
aspects of instrumentation currently employed in the biological sciences. Experieie 
will be provided on a variety of instruments including high performance liq'i 



39 

iromatographs; gas chromatographs; gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer; nu- 
ear magnetic resonance spectrometer; electron paramagnetic resonance spec- 
ometer; ultraviolet, visible and infrared spectrophotometers; spectrofluorometers; 
id cell sorter/cytofluorograph. (2-2). P — Chemistry through physical chemistry 
id two semesters of physics or permission of instructor. 

Thomas, Staff 
19, 420. Research. The department offers opportunities for investigation in a wide 
iriety of biochemical subjects under the guidance of staff members. Staff 



Biology 

Reynolda Campus 
Gerald W. Esch, Chairman 
rofessors Charles M. Allen, Ralph D. Amen, Gerald W. Esch, Mordecai J. Jaffe, 
Raymond E. Kuhn, James C. McDonald, Robert L. Sullivan, Peter D. Weigl, 

Raymond L. Wyatt 
ssociate Professors Ronald V. Dimock Jr., Herman E. Eure, A. Thomas Olive 
Assistant Professors Ramunas Bigelis, Carole L. Browne, Robert A. Browne, 

Hugo C. Lane 

Adjunct Professors Harold O. Goodman, Stephen H. Richardson 

Adjunct Associate Professor J. Whitfield Gibbons 

The Department of Biology offers programs of study leading to the M.A. and 
i.D. degrees. 

For admission to graduate work, the department requires an undergraduate 
ajor in the biological sciences or the equivalent (thirty semester hours or eight 
urses in biology, including some botany and zoology, beyond a general course), 
us at least four semesters of work in the physical sciences. Any deficiencies in these 
eas must be removed prior to admission to candidacy for a graduate degree. 
At the master's level the department emphasizes broad biological training rather 
an narrow specialization. Current research opportunities include physiological 
plogy, organismal physiology, animal behavior, plant and animal systematics, 
ecology, immunology, cell biology, parasitology, and population and community 
ology. It should be noted that graduate students desiring to use work taken in 
ology for graduate teacher certification should consult the Department of Educa- 
n before applying for candidacy. 

At the doctoral level few specific requirements are prescribed. Under the guidance 
the student's faculty adviser and advisory committee and with the approval of the 
partmental graduate committee, individual programs are designed for each stu- 
nt. As a supplement to or a substitution for part of the formal course work, the 
partment has established a special Tutorial Program. This program brings to 
,iipus each year three to five outstanding biologists to direct and participate in a 
res of seminars and discussion sessions with doctoral candidates. The areas cov- 



40 

ered by the Tutorial Program vary from year to year. In the past several years th 
program has emphasized genetics, physiological ecology, biosystematics, populatio 
ecology, and parasitology. 

The limited enrollment in the Ph.D. program dictates that prospective students b| 
accepted into that program only after it has been determined that their interests a^ 
compatible with the areas of expertise represented by the faculty. Prospective Ph.I 
students are encouraged to correspond with staff members whose areas of intere 
may seem compatible with their own. Additional information is available from tr 
chairman of the departmental graduate committee. 

Graduate study often requires the use of special research tools and skills such ; 
computer work or foreign languages. Candidates for the M.A. degree must demoi 
strate proficiency with one such special skill; Ph.D. candidates must be competei 
with two skills. The student's advisory committee determines in consultation with tl 
student and with the approval of the departmental graduate committee the specif 
areas and demonstrations of competence associated with these skills requiremen. 
Specific course work in areas such as biometrics and electron microscopy may be use 
to satisfy a skill requirement, if approved by the advisory committee. A course used i 
satisfy that requirement may not be counted in the credit hours required for the M.j. 
degree. 

At least one year of teaching, e.g. as a teaching assistant, is required of all Ph.] 
students during their tenure. 

All M.A. and Ph.D. students must take Biology 415 and 416. 

In order to remain a bona fide graduate student in the department, the studet 
must maintain a B average in all courses attempted. Any time this condition is not mi 
the student must reapply for acceptance into the program. 

Wake Forest is an institutional member of the Highlands Biological Station, whic 
offers research facilities in a high mountain area rich in transitional flora and faun 
The department has a field station situated on Belews Lake, about twenty miles fro 
the Reynolda Campus. 

Study leading to the M.A. degree was inaugurated in 1961. The Ph.D. degr! 
program began in September 1970. Departmental graduate committee: Dimo* 
(chairman), Eure, Kuhn, Sullivan, and one graduate student. 



FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATE STUDENTS; 



312. Genetics. (4) A study of the principles of inheritance and their application '■ 
plants and animals, including man. Laboratory work in the methods of breedii 
some genetically important organisms and of compiling and presenting data. 

Sulliv 

314. Evolution. (3) Analysis of the theories, evidences, and mechanisms of evo 
tion. A| 

320. Chordates. (4) A study of chordate animals, with emphasis on comparat 
anatomy and phylogeny. Dissection of representative forms in the laboratory. All 



41 



21. Parasitology. (4) A survey of protozoan, helminth, and arthropod parasites 
rom the standpoint of morphology, taxonomy, life histories, and host/parasite 
elationships. Esch Eure 

23. Animal Behavior. (3) A survey of laboratory and field research on animal 
ehavior. This course may count as biology or psychology, but not both; choice to be 
etermined at registration. Falkenberg, Weigl 

25. Plant Anatomy. (4) A study of comparative anatomy of the vascular plants, with 
mphasis on phylogeny and anatomical microtechniques. Wyatt 

26. Microbiology. (5) The structure, function, and taxonomy of microorganisms 
ith emphasis on the bacteria. Some immunological processes are considered. 

McDonald 

27. Non-Vascular Plants. (4) An examination of representative non-vascular 
lants, with emphasis on morphology and phylogeny. McDonald 

28. Vascular Plants. (4) A comparative survey of the vascular plants, with emphasis 
n structure, reproduction, classification, and phylogeny. Wyatt 

11. Invertebrates. (4) Systematic study of invertebrates, with emphasis on func- 
anal morphology, behavior, ecology, and phylogeny. Dimock 

J3. Vertebrates. (4) Systematic study of vertebrates, with emphasis on evolution, 
hysiology, behavior, and ecology. Laboratory devoted to systematic, field, and 
cperimental studies. Weiel 

$4. Entomology. (4) A study of insects, with emphasis on structure, development, 
xonomy, and phylogeny. Olive 

J8. Plant Taxonomy. (4) A study of the classification of seed plants, with emphasis 
l a comparative study of orders and families. Wyatt 

10. Ecology. (4) Interrelationships among living systems and their environments. 
ructure and dynamics of major ecosystem types. Contemporary problems in ecol- 
"' Weigl, Amen 

U. Marine Biology. (4) An introduction to the physical, chemical, and biological 
trameters affecting the distribution of marine organisms. Dimock 

12. Aquatic Ecology. (4) A course designed to cover the general principles and 
■ncepts of limnology and aquatic biology as they apply to lentic and lotic habitats. A 
ajor portion of the field studies centered at the C. M. Allen Biological Station. 

R. Browne, Esch 
8. Quantitative Biology. (3) An introduction to statistical methods used by biolo- 
its, including basic statistical parameters, analysis of variance, regression and 
rrelation, and non-parametric analysis. R Browne 

0. Physiology. (4) A lecture/laboratory course dealing with the phvsicochemical 
nctions common to multicellular organisms, with emphasis on the principles and 
ocesses of nutrition, metabolism, development, and behavior. (3-3). 

Amen, Jaffe, Lane 



42 



351. Animal Physiology. (4) A lecture and laboratory course which discusses am 
demonstrates the principles of bioelectricity and biomechanics. Regulatory princi 
pies and the physiology of the cardiovascular, respiratory and renal systems o, 
vertebrates are covered. (3-3). Lan 

352. Plant Physiology. (4) A study of the mechanisms by which various plan 
systems function, thematically structured around the plant life cycle. (3-3). 

Amen, Jaff 

354. Endocrinology. (3) A lecture course which explores the evolution of hormone 
and endocrine glands, and the physiology of the main endocrine systems of vert«| 
brates. The last part of the course will involve group presentations of clinical cas 
histories in endocrine homeostasis. Lan 

355. Developmental Physiology. (4) The application of the principles and po: 
tulates of molecular biology to the phenomenon of development in multicellula 
organisms with emphasis on the genetic and hormonal mechanisms of differenti; 
tion, totipotency, and morphogenesis. (3—3). Ame 

357. Cryptobiology. (3) The genetic and physiologic mechanisms of common state! 
of biotic rest in multicellular organisms: quiescence, dormancy, diapause, hibern; 
tion, estivation, sleep, and coma. Focus will be on the relation of states of biotic rest t 
senescence and death. Ame 

360. Development. (4) A study of development, including aspects of vertebrati 
invertebrate, and other developmental systems, emphasizing the regulation of di 
ferentiation. Kuh 1 

362. Immunology. (3) A study of the components and protective mechanisms of th 
immune system. Kuh 

370. Biochemistry. (4) A lecture/laboratorv course including principles of biochen 
istry, chemical composition of living systems, intermediary metabolism, enzyrr 
kinetics, biochemical energetics, and biochemical techniques. (3—3). Bigel 

372. Histology. (4) A study of the structure and function of cells, tissues, and organ 
with laboratory for examination of prepared histological slides. C. Browr 

374. Microtechnique. (3) An introduction to the biological application of light anl 
electron microscopy. C. Browr 

375. Regulation of Biochemical Processes. (3) An advanced biochemistry coun 
with an emphasis on processes that regulate metabolism at both the cellular an | 
organismal levels. Consideration will be given to molecular mechanisms as well as tl 
physiological consequences. Prerequisite: Introductorv biochemistry. B>g e 

376. Ichthyology. (4) A comparative studv of the structure/function, classificauo 
and phylogeny of fish. Eu: 

39 1, 392, 393, 394. Special Problems in Biology. (1,1,1,1) Independent library ar 
laboratory investigation carried out under the supervision of a member of the stalj 
P — Permission of instructor. Sta 



43 

395. Philosophy of Biology. (3) Lecture/seminar course dealing with the rational 
structure of the biologic sciences with emphasis on the reductionistic, organismic, 
ind teleonomic paradigms and theories of modern biology. The structure of major 
jio-scientific theories will receive emphasis. Amen 

S97. Seminar in Biology. (3) Consideration of major biological topics through 
ntensive reading and discussions. Staff 

198. Scientific Communications. (2) An introduction to bibliographic and graphic 
nethods, including microscopy, photography, scientific illustration and writing, and 
>reparation of manuscripts. P — Permission of instructor. Olive 

Vll 300 level courses presume a background equivalent to at least Introductory and 

ntermediate Biology (111, 1 50- 1 52). 



FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

101-408. Topics in Biology. (1-4) Seminar courses in selected topics, some involv- 
ng laboratory instruction. At least one offered each semester. Staff 

ill, 412. Directed Study in Biology. (1,1) Reading and/or laboratorv problems 
arried out under and by permission of a faculty member. Staff 

115. Seminar in Molecular and Cellular Biology. (2) Advanced topics in cellular 
nd subcellular biology. Staff 

:16. Seminar in Organismal and Evolutionary Biology. (2) The consideration of 
dvanced topics in the functional aspects of organisms and ecosystems. Staff 

:20. Genetics (Cytogenetics). (4) An advanced course stressing genetic mechanisms 
nd their biological significance. Bigelis, Sullivan 

30. Invertebrate Zoology. (4) Emphasis on the physiology and ecology of inverte- 
■rate animals. Dimock 

33. Vertebrate Zoology. (4) A study of certain aspects of vertebrate physiology, 
ehavior, ecology, and functional morphology. Laboratory devoted to special ex- 
erimental and field studies. Weigl 

40. Physiological Ecology. (4) Intensive study of the sensitivity and behavioral 
esponses of organisms to environmental cues. Amen, Dimock, Jaffe 

50. Cellular Physiology. (4) An advanced course stressing the ultrastructure and 
anctions of cells and organelles. C. Browne 

60. Developmental Biology. (4) An advanced course in the regulation of develop- 
tental systems. Amen Kuhn 

62. Immunology. (4) Humoral and cellular immune responses are examined to 
nderstand the basic immunobiology of vertebrates with special emphasis on cell-cell 
iteractions and immunoregulation. Laboratory experiments introduce students to 
ask methods in immunological research. Kuhn 



44 

480. Biosystematics. (4) An examination of the principles of systematics and phy 
logenetic relations. Olive, Wyat 

491, 492. Thesis Research. (3,3) Staf 

591, 592. Dissertation Research. (Hours open) Staf! 

Biostatistics and Epidemiology 

Hawthorne Campus 
Assistant Professors Wayne T. Corbett, Harry M. Schey 

404. Principles of Epidemiology. (3) A review of the basic concepts of epidemiolc 
gy, including community diagnosis, analvtical techniques, and evaluation of preven 
tive methods. Examples of both acute and chronic diseases covered in the lectures 
laboratory, and discussion groups. (2-2). P — Statistics course or equivalent. Corbel 

405. Introduction to Statistics. (3) Descriptive statistics, measures of central tender 
cy and dispersion; basic probability theory, probability distributions; estimation an 
hypothesis testing; simple regression and correlation; analysis of frequencies; nortf 
parametric methods. Sche 

406. Applied Linear Models. (3) Simple and multiple regression; estimation an 
hypothesis testing; matrix methods; one- and two-way analysis of variance; elemen 
of statistical design. P — 105 or permission of instructor. Sche 

420. Multivariate Statistical Analysis. (3) Topics in matrix algebra, with emphas 
on statistical estimation and tests of significance of general multivariate regressio 
and analysis of variance models. P — 405 and 406 or permission of instructor. 

Chemistry 

Reynolda Campus 

Ronald E. Noftle, Chairman 

Professors H. Wallace Baird, Phillip J. Hamrick Jr., Roger A. Hegstrom, 

Harry B. Miller, Ronald E. Noftle, John W. Nowell 

Associate Professors Paul M. Gross Jr., Willie L. Hinze 

Assistant Professors Charles F. Jackels, Susan C. Jackels, Richard R. M. Jonc 

The Department of Chemistry offers programs of study leading to the M.S. at 
Ph.D. degrees. Opportunities for study in courses and through research are availat 
in analvtical, inorganic, organic, physical, and theoretical chemistry. Research play 
major role in the graduate program. Since the number of graduate students is nl 
large, the research program of the individual student is enhanced by close da 
contact with the faculty. 

All applicants for graduate work in the department are expected to offer I 
preparation college-level fundamental courses in general, analvtical, organic, art 
physical chemistry; physics; and mathematics through one vear of calculus. Duri; 
registration all new graduate students take qualifier examinations covering the fiel* 
of analytical, inorganic, organic, and physical chemistry. Programs of study are i 
part determined by the results of these examinations, and deficiencies are to ' 
remedied during the student's first academic vear. 



45 



For the M.S. degree, the student is expected to undertake a broad program of 
ourse work at an advanced level and to complete successfully an original investiga- 
on. This investigation must be of the highest quality but necessarily limited in scope, 
'he student must also demonstrate either a reading competence in one foreign 
inguage or a competence in one special skills area. The choice of a particular foreign 
inguage or special skill is to be approved by the graduate committee. Students who 
old assistantships normally spend two years in residence for the completion of this 
egree. 

For the Ph.D. degree, individual programs are designed for each student under 
te guidance of the student's faculty adviser and advisory committee and with the 
pproval of the graduate committee. The University preliminary examination re- 
uirement is satisfied by successful completion of a series of written cumulative 
xaminations and by presentation of two research proposals, one of which is the 
issertation research project. Demonstration of a reading competence in one foreign 
^nguage is required, with the choice of language being subject to approval of the 
raduate committee. Each student is to present two departmental seminars, one of 
hich will be on the results of his or her dissertation research. The student must 
resent a dissertation and pass an examination on it as prescribed by the Graduate 
:hool, and other University requirements must be satisfied. 

The original graduate program, which led to the M.S. degree, was discontinued in 
349. The present M.S. program was begun in 1961, the Ph.D. in 1972. Departmen- 
.1 graduate committee: C. Jackels (chairman), Baird, Hinze, Jones. 



FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATE STUDENTS 



$23. Organic Analysis. (4) The systematic identification of organic compounds. 
1-4). P— 222. 

124. Chemical Synthesis. (2 or 3) A library, conference, and laboratory course. 
3ur or eight hours per week. P — 222. 

134. Chemical Analysis. (3 or 4) Theoretical and practical applications of modern 
ethods of chemical analysis. (3-4). C — 341. 

141, 342. Physical Chemistry. (4, 4) Fundamentals of physical chemistry. (3-4). 
—112, Mathematics 112, C— Physics 111-112. 

51, 362. Inorganic Chemistry. (3 or 4, 3) Principles and reactions of inorganic 
lemistry. (3-4, 3). C— 341. 

ri. Introductory Quantum Chemistry. (3) Introduction to the quantum theory 
id its application to chemical systems. (3-0). P— 342 or permission of instructor. 

>1, 382. Chemistry Seminar. Discussions of contemporary research. Attendance 
quired of all graduate students and all chemistry majors. No credit. 



departmental graduate committee approval required. 



46 



FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 



41 1, 412. Directed Study In Chemistry. ( 1 or 2, 1 or 2) Reading and/or laborator| 
problems carried out under supervision of a faculty member. P — Permission of 
graduate committee. Staf. 

421, 422. Advanced Organic Chemistry. (3, 3) Principles of organic chemistry, wit! 
particular emphasis on reaction mechanisms. Hamrick, Jones, Mille 

431, 432. Advanced Analytical Chemistry. (3,3) Principles and practical applica 
tions of analytical methods, with particular emphasis on modern spectral method? 
electroanalytical methods, and chemical separations. Hinz 

441. Molecular Structure. (3) The relationship of spectroscopic, dipole moment' 
diffraction, and other physical data to molecular structure. Spring only 

Susan Jackels, Noftl 

445. Thermodynamics. (3) A study of the application of the principles of therma 
dynamics to homogeneous and heterogeneous equilibria. Baird, Nowei 

446. Chemical Kinetics. (3) The application of kinetic theory to the studv of chemi 
cal reactions. Baird, Charles Jacket j 

447. Chemical Bonding. (3) A study of the electronic structure of atoms, molecules, 
and ion s- Hegstrom, Charles Jacket, 

461. Coordination Chemistry. (3) Theory, structure, properties, and selected reac 
tion mechanisms of transition metal complexes. Susan Jackels, Noftl' 

462. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. (3) Application of theoretical principles to trr 
study of inorganic chemistry, with emphasis on classes of compounds. 

Susan Jackels, Noftl'. 
471. Quantum Chemistry. (3) The quantum theory and its application to the struc) 
ture, properties, and interactions of atoms and molecules. P — 371 or its equivalent 

Hegstrom, Charles Jackel | 
475. Statistical Mechanics. (3) The study of the properties of macroscopic systemjl 
as arising from the properties and interactions of the constituent molecules. P — 37 
or its equivalent. Hegstrom, Charles Jackel 

491, 492. Thesis Research. (3, 3) Staf 

529. Tutorial in Organic Chemistry. (3) Hamrick, Jones, Mille 

539. Tutorial in Analytical Chemistry. (3) Hinz. 

549. Tutorial in Physical Chemistry. (3)Baird, Gross, Hegstrom, Charles Jackel 
569. Tutorial in Inorganic Chemistry. (3) Susan Jackels, Nofd 

579. Tutorial in Theoretical Chemistry. (3) Hegstrom, Charles Jacket] 

591, 592. Dissertation Research. (Hours open) Staf 



47 



Comparative Medicine 

Hawthorne Campus 

Thomas B. Clarkson Jr., Chairman 

Professor Thomas B. Clarkson Jr. 

Associate Professors Bill C. Bullock, Noel D. M. Lehner, Lawrence L. Rudel, 

William D. Wagner 
Assistant Professors M. Gene Bond, Jay R. Kaplan 

The Department of Comparative Medicine offers a program leading to the M.S. 
iegree in comparative medicine for students who hold the D.V.M. degree and, in 
onjunction with the Department of Pathology, it offers the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees 
i comparative and experimental pathology (see Interdisciplinary Program). 

Research is an important facet of departmental activity, and research training is 
mphasized in its educational program. Investigative efforts focus on the biology and 
iseases of animals, their maintenance and use in the laboratory, and their rela- 
.onship to humans and human disorders. A major interest is comparative 
therosclerosis, including morphologic and metabolic characteristics of atheroscle- 
otic lesions in a variety of animal species. 

With the trend toward the use of increasing numbers of primates in research 
elated to human health, there is an active interest in the biology and diseases of 
rimates. A colony of approximately 1,000 primates of several species is maintained 
) provide ample material for students interested in primate biology. A large colony 
f pigeons, specially bred and maintained for atherosclerosis research, also provides 
pportunities for research in genetics, oncology, and infectious diseases. 

The foreign language and special skills requirements for the M.S. degree may be 
let by either a reading knowledge of a foreign language or a special skill such as 
iostatistics, computer programming, electrocardiography, or electroencephalogra- 
hy. In selecting an appropriate language or skill, the department is guided by the 
udent's background and interests. 

The M.S. degree has been offered since 1964. 

01. Introduction to Animal Experimentation. (3) Designed to provide the student 
•ith a knowledge of the biology and care of the commonly used laboratory animals, 
mphasis is on strains, sources, anatomy, physiology, and nutrition. Techniques of 
.ibstances administration, specimen collection, and anesthesia are discussed and 
ampetence achieved by the student during laboratory exercises. P — B.S. in biology 
r equivalent. Clarkson, Staff 

01, 402. Diseases of Laboratory Animals. (5, 5) A two-semester course in which the 
aturally occurring diseases of laboratory animals are considered in depth. The 
:cture portion of the courses is arranged by animal species to consider the preva- 
:nce and physiological and pathological expression of both infectious and metabolic/ 
egenerative diseases. Emphasis is on diagnostic and control methods and in particu- 
ir on the effect of these diseases on experimental animal variation. The laboratory 
ortion involves the investigation of animal diseases by clinical laboratory methods 
nd the post mortem diagnosis of laboratory animal disease by pathologic and 
licrobiologic methods. Emphasis on animal necropsy methods and storage-retrieval 




Associate Professor William D. Wagner and graduate students Carol Marietta (left) and Mar 
Fesler using electrophoresis equipment to study arterial wall polysaccharides 



49 



Df data obtained from the necropsy laboratory. P — D.V.M. or M.D. degree or 
permission of instructor. Offered in odd-numbered years. Bullock 

104. Animal Models in Biomedical Research. (5) Designed to provide the student 
,vith the current knowledge about animal models used in biomedical research. The 
major disease problems of man are discussed by organ system. For each disease 
Droblem, the advantages and disadvantages of animal models in current use are 
discussed. Both experimentally induced and naturally occurring diseases of animals 
ire considered. P — D.V.M. or M.D. degree or permission of instructor. Offered in 
•ven-numbered years. Clarkson, Staff 

105. Basic Primatology. (3) Acquaints the student with the taxonomic classification 
ind geographical distribution of the non-human primates of biomedical interest. 
Additional emphasis on social structure and population dynamics of free-ranging 
groups of primates and social structures of laboratory primate groups. P — 
Permission of instructor. Offered in odd-numbered years. Kaplan 

106. Medical Primatology. (3) Designed to acquaint the student with the anatomic 
ind physiologic characteristics and diseases of non-human primates. Emphasis on 
he clinical manifestations, diagnosis, pathologic characteristics, and management of 
nfectious diseases which are the principal causes of morbidity and mortality in 
aboratory primates. P — Two semesters of pathology. Offered in even-numbered years. 

Lehner, Staff 

108. Primate Ethology. (3) Introduces the student to current concepts of primate 
lehavior, especially as behavior is influenced by environment, to increase under- 
tanding of psychosocial influences on disease processes. P — Permission of instruc- 
or. Offered in odd-numbered years. Kaplan 

09, 410. Advanced Topics in Comparative Medicine. (Credit to be arranged, 1-5) 
in advanced lecture and student participation course dealing with areas of new 
nowledge in comparative medicine. P — General biochemistry, general pathology, 
>r equivalents. Staff 

11,412. Necropsy Conference. (1,1) Necropsy cases are presented and discussed 
■y postdoctoral fellows and staff. Management of current medical problems and the 
omparative aspects of the materials presented are emphasized. Staff 

13, 414. Research. The department offers research in a variety of topics in labora- 
3ry animal medicine, including research in preparation for the master's thesis and 
ne doctoral dissertation. Staff 



50 



Education 

Reynolda Campus 

Joseph O. Milner, Chairman 

Professors Thomas M. Elmore, John E. Parker Jr., Herman J. Preseren, 

J. Don Reeves 

Associate Professors John H. Litcher, Joseph O. Milner 

Assistant Professors Patricia M. Cunningham, Linda N. Nielsen, 

Leonard P. Roberge 

The graduate degree is offered in seven fields, with certificate programs in fiv 
Individual programs of study, which are planned jointly by the students and the 
committees, are based upon students' vocational objectives and educational bac, 
grounds. The courses taught in the department may be used also for the renewal <, 
school certificates. 

Certificate Programs 

Graduate Secondary Teacher's Certificate (7-12). The M.A. in Education degree 
awarded to the candidate with a North Carolina Class A teacher's certificate or i' 
equivalent who completes successfully a minimum of thirty semester hours of wor! 
including six hours for the thesis, six hours in professional education, and eighte« 
hours in biology, chemistry, English, history, mathematics, physical educatio 
physics, or speech. 

For the candidate who desires the degree in two teaching areas the requirements 
professional education are the same. The academic field study is twenty-four or mo 
semester hours, with at least twelve hours in each of the two teaching fields. Tl 
thesis is written in one of the two fields. This program requires the completion <■ 
thirty-six semester hours. 

Graduate Elementary Teacher's Certificate (K-3, 4-9). The M.A. in Education degree 
awarded to the candidate with a North Carolina Class A teacher's certificate or i 
equivalent who completes successfully a minimum of thirty semester hours of wor 
including six hours for the thesis. (Approval of program by North Carolina Depai 
ment of Public Instruction pending. Contact the Chairman of the Education Depai 
ment for further information.) 

School Counselor's Certificate. The M.A. in Education degree is awarded to cane] 
dates for the school counselor's certificate who successfullv complete a program < 
study based on the requirements of the North Carolina State Board of Educational'] 
in keeping with the background and needs of the student. The program usual 
consists of at least forty hours distributed between professional education am 
psychology, plus six to twelve hours assigned for internship and counseling labor 
tory, including the research report. 

School Psychologist II — Psxchometrist Certificate. The M.A. in Education degree | 
awarded to candidates for the School Psychologist II — Psychometrist certificate wl 
successfully complete a minimum of forty semester hours of course work, plus sixfl 
twelve hours assigned for practicum and internship, including a research report iril 
program of study based on the requirements of the North Carolina State Board | 



51 

Education and in keeping with the background and needs of the student. The 
tudent can readily earn dual certification as a School Counselor and School Psychol- 
<gist II — Psychometrist. 

Graduate Gifted and Talented Certificate (K-12) The MA. in Education degree is 
warded to the candidate with a North Carolina Class A teacher's certificate or its 
quivalent who completes successfully a minimum of thirty-three semester hours of 
'ork, including six hours for the thesis. 

General Programs 

Counseling. The M. A. in Education degree is awarded to candidates who successful- 
■ complete a minimum of forty-eight semester hours, a comprehensive examination, 
rid a thesis or research report in counseling, education, or related fields. A common 
jre of courses is taken, with some degree of specialization to prepare students for 
mployment in a variety of educational and community service agencies. 
Educational Foundations. The M.A. in Education degree is awarded to candidates 
ho successfully complete a minimum of thirty semester hours, including six hours 
>r the thesis or internship report and six hours in the Department of Education. The 
iditional hours are selected from courses in Education and other departments to 
eet the specialized needs and interests of the candidate. State teacher certification 
innot be earned through this program. 

Master of Arts. Master of Arts degree candidates in the academic areas who hold a 
lass A certificate may be recommended for a G certificate in teaching if an addition- 
six semester hours of education are taken in the Department of Education, 
andidates should consult the Department of Education. 

A program of study leading to the M.A. in Education degree has been offered since 
)67. Departmental graduate committee: Reeves (chairman), Elmore, Parker. 



FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADU ATES AND GRADUATE STUDENTS 

)1. Audio-Visual Education. (3) A survey of the theory, history, and techniques of 
iing audio-visual instruments and their relation to the current educational pro- 
"am. Repeated spring and summer. Preseren 

)2. Production of Instructional Materials. (3) Methods of producing instructional 
aterials and other technological techniques. P— 301 and senior or graduate stand- 
g. Repeated summer. Preseren 

13. History of Western Education. (3) Educational theory and practice from 
icient times through the modern period, including American education. Reeves 
»4. Theories of Education. (3) Contemporary proposals for educational theory 
id practice studies in the context of social issues. Reeves 

'6. Studies in the History and Philosophy of Education. (3) A study of selected 
storical eras, influential thinkers, or crucial problems in education. Topics 
nounced annually. Reeves 



52 



313. Human Growth and Development. (3) Theories of childhood and adolescen 
development, their relation to empirical research, and their educational implica, 
tions. Consideration of the relation to learning of physical, intellectual, emotional 
social, and moral development in childhood and adolescence. Clar!, 

323. Educational Statistics. (3) Descriptive, inferential, and non-parametric statis; 
tical procedures involved in educational research. Not open to students who havj 
taken Psychology 211 and 212. P — Permission of instructor. Nielsei 

341. Principles of Counseling and Guidance. (3) Counseling history, philosophy 
theory, procedure, and process. Therapeutic and developmental counseling 
approaches in guidance and personnel work in educational, social, business, an< 
community service agencies. Repeated spring and summer. Elmore, Robergc 

383. Reading in the Content Areas. (3) An introduction to teaching the basi, 
reading skills at the intermediate and secondary level; vocabulary, comprehension, 
reading rate, selection of texts, and critical and interpretive reading. Particularl 
stressed are diagnoses of reading problems and techniques for correcting thesi 
problems in specific subject content areas. Cunninghan 

390. Education of Exceptional Persons (2) A survey of the types of exceptionality 
Emphasis will be placed on characteristics, identification, educational programming 
management, and evaluation. Litche 

391. Teaching the Gifted. (3) A general investigation of the theory and practio 
which have special meaning for the gifted child, including an examination of genera 
curricular matters, such as classroom styles, learning modes, epistemologicai 
theories, developmental constructs, and psychosociological patterns which havtd 
special pertinence to the teacher of the gifted. Milne 

393. Individual Study. (3) A project in the area of study not otherwise available ii 
the department; permitted upon departmental approval of petition presented by ; I 
qualified student. Staf 



FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 



405. Sociology of Education. (3) A study of contemporary society and education 
including goals and values, institutional culture, and the teaching/learning process 

Reeve 

407. Philosophy of Education. (3) Survey of philosophical systems and their influ 
ence on education. Philosophical foundations of educational theories. Analysis a 
educational issues and problems. Reeve 

411. Reading Theory and Practice. (3) A study of current reading theory an< 
consideration of its application in the teaching of reading, grades K-l 2. Cunninghan 

413. Psychology of Learning: Classroom Motivation and Discipline. (3) Study d 
the nature and fundamental principles of learning. Major learning theories and theil 



53 



implications for teaching problems. Cognitive processes, concept-formation, prob- 
lem-solving, transfer of learning, creative thinking, and the learning of attitudes, 
beliefs, and values. Research in learning. Spring. Nielsen 

414. Instructional Strategies and Evaluation. (3) Application of learning theories to 
Instructional strategies and techniques and evaluation of various assessment tech- 
f 11 ^ 5 - Litcher 

421. Educational Research. (3) Theory, construction, and procedures of empirical 
research dealing with educational problems. Analysis and evaluation of research 
■tudies; experience in the design and execution of research studies. Clark 

131. Foundations of Curriculum Development. (3) Philosophical, psychological, 
ind social influences on the school curriculum. Examination of both theoretical and 
Dractical curriculum patterns for the modern school. Processes of curriculum de- 
felopment, including the leadership function of administration and research. Spring. 

Parker 
:33. Supervision of Instruction. (3) An analysis of various techniques of super- 
lsion; orientation of teachers, in-service education, classroom observation, indi- 
ndual follow-up conferences, ways to evaluate instruction, and methods for initiat- 
ing changes. Parker 

35. Appraisal Procedures for Counselors. (3) An overview of the development, 
uerpretation, and application of tests of achievement, aptitude, interest, personal- 
y, intelligence, and other inventories commonly employed by counselors. Issues in 
ppraisal techniques and pertinent concepts of measurement discussed. Roberge 

36. Advanced Appraisal Procedures. (3) Appraisal, assessment, and diagnosis of 
motional, intellectual, personality, and learning disorders found in schools and 
,uman service agencies. Staff 

41. Theories and Models of Counseling. (3) The study of theoretical bases and 
oproaches to counseling, including psychoanalytic, behavioristic, existential, phe- 
bmenological, and eclectic; the process of counseling within these approaches. 

Roberge 
12. Group Procedures in Counseling. (3) An experiential and conceptual explora- 
pn of the psychological dynamics and interpersonal communication of small 
•oups, including the purpose and process of group procedures, such as group 
udance, group counseling, T-groups, encounter groups, sensitivity training, 
ychodrama, and sensory awareness techniques. P— 341 or 441. Repeated summer. 

Elmore, Roberge 
'3. Vocational Psychology. (3) Vocational development throughout life; psvcho- 
feical aspects of work; occupational structure and the classifications of occupational 
lerature; theories of vocational choice and their implications for vocational counsel- 
to. P or C — 341. Repeated summer. Roberge 
4. Individual Assessment. (3) The educational and psychological evaluation of 
lv.duals by means of tests, clinical observation, and personal data. Development of 
■lis in testing, using the case study method, writing case reports, and formulating 



54 



educational procedures. Not open to students who have taken Psychology 451. 

Elmore 

445. Counseling Practicum and Internship. (3-6) Observation of counseling; case 
studv procedures', analysis of tape-recorded interviews; role-playing; supervisee 1 
counseling experience. P — 341. Repeated spring and summer. Elmore, Roberge 

446. Counseling Children. (3) Theory and practice of counseling with children ir 
schools and community agencies. Elementary school counseling: models, methods 
and materials. Counseling children with special emotional, learning, psychological 
or behavioral concerns. Staff; 

455. Advanced Counseling Practicum and Internship. (3) Extension of basic prac 
ticum and internship experience for advanced counseling and school psychology 
students. Staf 

461. Student Personnel Work and Higher Education. (3) History, philosophy 
organization, and functioning of student personnel services in American highel 
education; college and university structure, governance, and reform; curricular ami 
extracurricular approaches to learning; relevant issues in student life. P — 341, 441 j 
or permission of instructor. Elmor, 

463. Seminar in Counseling. (3) Exploration of special topics in the field of counsei 
ing and student personnel work. Elmor 

481. Methodology and Research. (3) Advanced study of the methods and materia:] 
of a specific discipline (English, social studies, mathematics, science) in the curried 
lum with special attention directed to the basic research in the discipline. Stall 

482. Developmental Counseling Psychology. (3) Theoretical, research, and methc 
dological aspects of an eclectic/developmental framework for counseling. Integra 
tion and application of major theories to different settings with particular referenc 
to different age groupings and other special populations. Sta! 

483. Readings and Research in Education. (1-3) Independent study and research o 
topics relevant to the student's field of concentration which course may include I 
special reading program in an area not covered by other courses or a special researc 
project. Supervision bv faculty members. Hours of credit to be determined prior t 
registration. Sta^ 

486. Consultation and Program Development in Counseling. (3) Consultatio. 
theorv and process. Consultation with families, schools, colleges, and communij 
agencies. Models for facilitating change in human systems. Stal 

491, 492. Thesis Research. (3, 3). Sta 



English 

Reynolda Campus 

Robert N. Shorter, Chairman 

Professors John Archer Carter Jr., Doyle Richard Fosso, Thomas Frank Gossett, 

Alonzo W. Kenion, Elizabeth Phillips, Lee Harris Potter, Robert N. Shorter, 

Edwin Graves Wilson 

Associate Professors Nancy Cotton, Andrew V. Ettin, W. Dillon Johnston, 

Robert W. Lovett, William M. Moss, Blanche C. Speer 

The courses for which credit may be earned toward the fulfillment of require- 
ments for the M.A. degree offer opportunities for study and research in most of the 
riajor areas of both British and American literature and in the English language. The 
ourses for graduates only (numbered above 400) stress independent study and 
esearch out of which theses may develop. 

| Candidates for degrees are required to have a reading knowledge of a modern 
breign language. Students can meet this requirement by submitting satisfactory 
tores on the Graduate School Foreign Language Test in French, German, or 
pamsh, or by making a satisfactory grade in an advanced reading course in a foreign 
anguage taken in residence at the University. With the approval of the department 
mother language may be substituted. 

' Students seeking graduate teacher certification are required to take six semester 
ours of courses in the Department of Education in addition to those for the M.A. 
egree in English. 

| With approval by the departmental graduate committee, students may take one or 
vo related courses in other departments. 

! This program began in 1961. Departmental graduate committee: Ettin (chair- 
)an), Lovett, Potter. 



FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADU ATE AND GRADUATE STUDENTS 

)4. History of the English Language. (3) A survey of the development of English 
max, morphology, and phonology from Old English to the present, with attention 
, vocabulary growth. § . 

.10. Studies in Medieval British Literature.p) Selected readings from areas such as 
hgious drama, non-dramatic religious literature, romance literature, literary 
eory, and philosophy. Shorter 

: 5. Chaucer. (3) Emphasis on The Canterbury Tales and Troi/us and Criseyde, with 
!me attention to minor poems. Consideration of literarv, social, religious and 
|iilosophical background. Shorter 

'■ 0. British Drama to 1642. (3) British drama from its beginnings to 1642, exclusive 
: Shakespeare. Representative cycle plays, moralities, Elizabethan and Jacobean 
:igedies, comedies, and tragicomedies. Cotton 



56 

323. Shakespeare. (3) Thirteen representative plays illustrating Shakespeare's de! 
velopment as a poet and dramatist. Fossi 

325. Studies in British Literature, 1500-1600. (3) Selected topics, prose, and poetr 
from the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, exclusive of drama and Miltor 
Emphasis on Elizabethan lyrics and Spenser or on Donne and the Metaphvsic; 
poets. Fossl 

327. Milton. (3) The poetry and selected prose of John Milton, with emphasis o 
Paradise Lost. Etti, 

330. British Literature of the Eighteenth Century. (3) Representative poetry anjl 
prose, exclusive of the novel, 1700-1800, drawn from Addison. Steele, Defoe, Swif 
Pope, Johnson, Boswell, Goldsmith, and Burns. Consideration of cultural back 
grounds and significant literary trends. Kenio 

332. Satire. (3) The nature of the satiric form and the satiric spirit as reveale. 
through reading and critical analysis of significant examples, mostly British an, 
American. Kenio 

335. Eighteenth Century British Fiction. (3) Primarily the fiction of Defoe, Richarc 
son, Fielding, Smollett, Sterne, and Austen. Love' 

350. British Romantic Poets. (3) A review of the beginnings of Romanticism il 
British literature, followed by study of Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Keats, anjj 
Shelley; collateral reading in the prose of the period. Wilso 

353. Nineteenth Century British Fiction. (3) Representative major works bv Die: 
ens, Eliot, Thackeray. Hardy, the Brontes, and others. Carta 

354. Victorian Poetry. (3) A study of Tennyson, Browning, Hopkins, and Arnold ( 
another Victorian poet. JohnstcJ 

360. Studies in Victorian Literature. (3) Selected topics, such as development 

genres, major texts, cultural influences. Reading in poetry, fiction, autobiographj 
and other prose. Carter, Johnstdi 

362. Blake, Yeats, and Thomas. (3) Reading and critical analysis of the poetry 
Blake, Yeats, and DvlanThomas; study of the plays of Yeats and his contemporari' 
in the Irish Renaissance, especially Svnge and Ladv Gregory. Wilsc 

364. Studies in Literary Criticism. (3) Consideration of certain figures and schoc 
of thought significant in the history of literary criticism. Pott 

365. Twentieth Century British Fiction. (3) A study of Conrad, Lawrence, Joyc] 
Forster, Woolf, and later British writers, with attention to the social and intellectu. 
backgrounds. Pott 

367. Twentieth Century Poetry. (3) Selected American and British poets from 19' 
to 1965. PhilM 

368. Studies in Irish Literature. (3) Critical readings of the works of major Irili 
writers within the context of the political, social, and literary history of Ireland.! 

Johnsti 



369. Modern Drama. (3) Modern drama from its late nineteenth century naturalist 
beginnings to the contemporary theatre. Cotton 

872. American Romanticism. (3) Writers of the mid-nineteenth century, including 
Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, and Melville. Mos s 

374. Intellectual and Social Movements in American Literature to 1865 (3) 
selected topics such as Puritanism, the Enlightenment, Transcendentalism and 
Romanticism. ,, 

Moss 

'576. American Poetry from 1855 to 1900. (3) Readings from at least two of the 
jollowing poets: Whitman, Dickinson, and Melville. Phillips 

78. Literature of the American South. (3) A study of Southern literature from its 
beginnings to the present, with emphasis upon such major writers as Tate Warren 
'aulkner, O'Connor, Welty, and Styron. Mo$ ' s 

80. American Fiction from 1865 to 1915. (3) Such writers as Twain, fames Howells 
.rane, Dreiser, Wharton, and Cather. Gossett 

81. Studies in Black American Literature. (3) Reading and critical analysis of 
-lected fiction, poetry, drama, and other writing by representative black Americans. 

McPherson 

82. Modern American Fiction, 1915 to the Present. (3) To include such writers as 
ewis, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, Steinbeck, Wolfe, Wright, Katherine Anne 
orter. Mailer, Bellow, Malamud, Flannery O'Connor, Baldwin, and Styron. 

Moss, Gossett 
33, 384. Theory and Practice of Verse Writing. (3, 3) Emphasis on reading and 
.scussing student poems in terms of craftsmanship and general principles. Staff 
86. Directed Reading. (3) A tutorial in an area of study not otherwise provided by 
e department; granted upon departmental approval of petition presented bv a 
iahfied student. 

Staff 

9. Use of the Library in Literary Research. (3) Attention to materials, methods 
Id bibliography for study in literature. Staf f 

:>0 Structure of English. (3) An introduction to the principles and techniques of 
«odern linguistics applied to contemporary American English. Speer 



FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 



: 

nt every course listed in this section is given every year, but at least three are offered 
I the regular academic year, and normally one in each term of the summer session. 
: 1. Studies in the Arthurian Legend. (3) Emphasis on the origin and develop- 
tnts of the Arthurian legend in England and France, with primary focus on 
Ulory s Le Morte Darthur. Attention to social and intellectual backgrounds 



Shorter 



58 



415. Studies in Chaucer. (3) Emphas,s on selected Canterbury Tales Troilus am\ 
Crueyde, and the longer minor works, with attention to social, critical, and intellects 
background. Lectures, reports, discussions, and a critical paper. bnorta 

421. Studies in Spenser. (3) Emphasis on The Faerie Queene; attention to the mino. 
works; intellectual and critical background. Lectures, d.scussions, and class papers 

425 Studies in Seventeenth Century British Literature. (3) Non-dramatic litera 
ture of the seventeenth century, exclusive of Milton. Emphasis on selected majo - 
writers. Lectures, discussions, and presentat.on of studies by members of the class, 

rossn 

433. Eighteenth Century British Fiction. (3) A study of two major British novelist] 
of the eighteenth century. Lectures, reports, critical papers. Authors for stud 
chosen from the following: Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Smollet. and Austen. J 

435. Major Augustans. (3) A study of some of the principal works of the perio 

1600-1740, selected from the following writers: Drvden, Add.son, Steele, Swift, ar^ 

Pope. Lectures, reports, discussion, and a critical paper. Kemoj 

443. Nineteenth Century British Fiction. (3) A study of two major British novel 

of the nineteenth century. Lectures, reports, discussions, and a critical paper. J 

thors for study chosen from the following: Austen. Dickens, Thackeray, Eliot.J 

Hardy- 

445 British Poetry of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries. (3) A study 

several British poets chosen from the major Romantics, Tennyson, BrowrungJ| 

dy, and Yeats. 

455. Studies in American Fiction. (3) A study of the principal fiction of two m| 

American writers of the nineteenth century. Lectures, seminar reports, and a r 

search paper. Authors for study chosen from the following: Poe, Hawthorne^Mj 

ville, Twain, James, and Faulkner. 

457. American Poetry. (3) Studies of the poetry and poetic theory of three maj 

American writers in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Writers chosen from t 

following: Whitman, Dickinson, Frost, Eliot, Stevens, and Williams. Discuss.o,, 

reports, and a critical paper. 

465 Literary Criticism. (3) A review of historically significant problems in lite £ 

criticism, followed bv study of the principal schools of twentieth century ml 

thought. Lectures, reports, discussions, and a paper of criticism. ■ " 

489. Linguistics in Literature. (3) Examination of theories of grammar and a, 

tudes toward the English language reflected in the literature of selected permc 

491, 492. Thesis Research. (3, 3) 



59 



History 

Reynolda Campus 
Richard L. Zuber, Chairman 
>rofessors Richard Chambers Barnett, Cyclone Covey, Balkrishna G. Gokhale 
J. Edwin Hendricks Jr., Thomas E. Mullen, Percival Perry, David L. Smiley, ' 
ienry Smith Stroupe, Lowell R. Tillett, W. Buck Yearns Jr., Richard L Zuber 
Associate Professors James P. Barefield, Merrill G. Berthrong, David W. Hadley, 
James G. McDowell, J. Howell Smith, Alan J. Williams 

The undergraduate major required for unqualified admission to graduate study 
j the Department of History must contain at least twenty-four semester hours or 
quivalent credits (eight courses), including courses in United States and modern 
uropean history. The student planning to write a thesis in the South Asian field 
lust have completed introductory courses in Asian history and civilization at the 
hdergraduate level. An applicant should also have a reading knowledge of French 
erman, Spanish, or another appropriate foreign language at the time of enrollment 
Id cannot be considered for admission unless training in a foreign language is 
tfficient to indicate that the Graduate School Foreign Language Test could be 
kssed by the end of the first semester. It is suggested that students interested in 
aantified historical research take Mathematics 155, Introduction to Fortran Proeram- 
\ng. « 

.Graduate study is offered in the history of the United States, modern Europe 
hgland, the British Empire, and South Asia. A student's program must include at 
fcst one seminar at the 400 level. Research materials are available at the University 

within the area on North Carolina, the South, American church history historic 
eservation, England, Western Europe, the British Empire and Commonwealth 

d South Asia. 

Although the minimum residence requirement for the M.A. degree is two semes- 
h, students should normally plan to spend a calendar year completing require- 
tats, Some courses are offered in the summer session, enabling the student who 
thes to do so to enter in June and receive the M.A. degree one vear later 
Mudents desiring to use work taken in the department for graduate teacher 
i'titication should consult the Department of Education prior to applying for 
,ididacy. rr ' 6 

,This program began in 1961. Departmental graduate committee: Yearns (chair- 
in), Barnett, McDowell, Smith, Williams, Zuber. 



FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE S AND GRADUATE STUDENTS 

I. Seminar. (3) Offered by members of the staff on topics of their choice A paner 
squired. c rr 

I Staff 

,312. Social and Intellectual History of Modern Europe. (3, 3) Intellectual 
ids in Western European civilization. Fall, seventeenth and eighteenth centuries- 
ring, nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Berthrons 



60 

316. France and England in the Twelfth and Thirteenth Centuries. (3) The struc 
ture of society, the nature of law, church/state relations, and intellectual develop 
ments. P — Permission of instructor. Barefieli 

319, 320. Germany. (3, 3) Fall, origins of the German nation and the rise of Prussi, 
in a context of particularism; spring, from the Reich of Bismarck to divided Ger 
many. McDoweW 

321. France: Old Regime and Revolution. (3) The reconstruction of political am, 
social order following the Wars of Religion; the Enlightenment; the collapse Oj 
monarchy. William 

322. France since the Revolution. (3) The quest for a new internal order and th 
reaction of France to an era of rapid change, from the fall of Robespierre to th 
departure of Charles de Gaulle. William 

323. 324. England. (3, 3) A political and social survey, with some attention H 
Continental movements. Fall, to 1603; spring, 1603 to present. Barnett, Hadle, 

325. Tudor and Early Stuart England. (3) A constitutional and social study cl 
England from 1485 to 1641. Barne< 

329, 330. Modern England. (3, 3) Political, social, economic, and cultural history c 
England since 1714. Fall, to 1815; spring, since 1815. Hadle^l 

331, 332. Russia. (3, 3) Primarily political, with some attention to cultural and soci;. 
developments. Fall, the Russian Empire; spring, the Soviet Union. Tillet 

333. European Diplomatic History, 1848-1914. (3) Research/discussion semint 
with emphasis on topics from the Bismarck era. Mulle 

335, 336. Italy. (3, 3) 335: medieval and Renaissance Italy to 1529; 336: 1529 to t£| 
present. Barefiel 

341. Southeast Asia from 1511 to the Present. (3) A survey of historv and culture <| 
Southeast Asia under Western colonial systems, with special reference to economic 
social, and cultural developments, the rise of nationalism, and the emergence of ne ( 
nation-states. Gokha, 

342. The Middle East from Suleiman the Magnificent to the Present. (3) Mai 
subjects covered include the rise and fall of the Ottoman Empire, the Arabs ari| 
Persians under Ottoman hegemonv, the rise of Arab nationalism, and the emergen< 
of the modern Arab states and their role since World War II. Gokha 

343. Imperial China. (3) The development of traditional institutions in Chine:, 
society to 1644, with attention to social, cultural, and political factors, emphasizir 
continuity and resistance to change. Sincla 

344. Modern China. (3) The Manchu Dvnasty and its response to the Westeij 
challenge; the 1911 Revolution; the warlord era and the rise of the Communist 
Chinese Communist societv; the Cultural Revolution. Sincla 

345. 346. History and Civilization of South Asia. (3, 3) An introduction to tl 



history and civilization of South Asia. Emphasis on historical developments in the 
social, economic, and cultural life. Gokhale 

347. India in Western Literatures. (3) An historical survey of images of India in 
Western literature, with special reference to religious and philosophical ideas, art, 
bolity, society, and culture. Gokhale 

$48. Modern Japan. (3) Tokugawa era: Meiji Restoration; industrialization and 
arbanization; relations with the West; World War II; occupation; Japan in the 
jontemporary world. Sinclair 

$49, 350. East Asia. (3, 3) An introduction to the social, cultural, and political 
development of China, Japan, and Korea. Fall, to 1600; spring, since 1600. 

Sinclair 

151, 352. Social and Intellectual History of the United States. (3, 3) The rela- 
ionship between ideas and society. Religion, science, education, architecture, and 
immigration are among the topics discussed. Zuber 

553. Colonial English America, 1582-1774. (3) Determinative episodes, figures, 
illegiances, apperceptions, and results of the period, organically considered. Covey 

$54. Revolutionary and Early National America, 1763-1820. (3) The American 
devolution, its causes and effects, the Confederation, the Constitution, and the new 
jiation. Hendricks 

155. The Westward Movement. (3) The role of the frontier in United States history, 
1763-1890. Usually offered in summer only. Smiley 

156. Jacksonian America, 1820-1850. (3) The United States in the age of Jackson, 
C)lay, Calhoun, and Webster. A biographical approach. Hendricks 

157. The Civil War and Reconstruction. (3) The political and military events of the 
Var and the economic, social, and political readjustments which followed. Yearns 

158. The United States from Reconstruction to World War I. (3) National progress 
ind problems during an era of rapid industrialization. Yearns 

159. Twentieth Century America I. (3) The transition of America from World War 
to the eve of World War II, with special emphasis on the "Roaring Twenties" and 

"he New Deal. Smith 

160. Twentieth Century America II. (3) Recent United States developments from 
^earl Harbor to the eve of the present. Smith 

|62. American Constitutional History. (3) Origins of the Constitution, con- 
roversies involving the nature of the union, and constitutional readjustments to 
beet the new American industrialism. Yearns 

!63, 364. The South. (3, 3) Geography, population elements, basic institutions, and 
elected events. Smiley 

'65. Women in American History. (3) A survey of the roles and activities of women 
h America, with emphasis upon selected individuals. Smiley 

'66. Studies in Historic Preservation. (3) An analysis of history museums and 



agencies and of the techniques of preserving and interpreting history througl 
artifacts, restorations, and reconstructions. P — Permission of instructor. 

Hench ick I 

367, 368. North Carolina. (3. 3) Selected phases of the development of Nortlj 
Carolina from the Colonial beginnings to the present. Fall, to 1789; spring, sine! 
1789. Stroupl 

369. The American Military Experience. (3) A survey of the military ideas am j 
activities of the American people and their armed forces, with emphasis on thJ 
relationship between war and societv. Zttbe : 

391, 392. Historiography. (3, 3) The principal historians and their writings froii 
ancient times to the present. Fall, European historiography; spring, American histoi 
iography. ° err 

398. Individual Study. (3) A project in an area of study not otherwise available in th| 
department; permitted upon departmental approval of petition presented by ; 
qualified student. Stall 

399. Directed Reading. (1-3) Stall 



FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 



431. Seminar. (3) Instruction in the methods of historical research and writing 
Specialists in American, Asian, and European history discuss areas for researcl 
bibliographical and reference tools, and available source materials for theses in the 
respective fields. Each student is required to engage in a research project and to wrifi 
a paper for discussion and criticism by the class and the seminar director. Sta: 
438. Studies in European History. (3) The history of selected periods and area 
Conducted chieflv bv readings and student reports. Barne 

447. Topics in Modern India. (3) Intensive explorations of select economic, social 
and cultural developments in India under British rule. Lectures, readings, an 
student reports. Gokha: 

452. Studies in United States History. (3) The history and bibliography of selecte, 
topics. Primarilv readings and student reports. Yearr 

463, 464. American Foundations. (6) A survey of the European heritage arj 
colonial environment which developed into the American culture of the late eigh 
eenth and earlv nineteenth centuries. A cooperative program of the University an 
Reynolda House Inc. Lectures provide a continuity of theme; Old Salem and oth« 
historic sites provide opportunities for giving history a visual dimension. A researa 
project required. Summer. Covey, Sta 

466. Advanced Studies in Historic Preservation. (3) A detailed studv of currei 
preservation activities including recent developments in the museum field, preservi 
tion law, community preservation, adaptive use, and the economics of preservatio; 
p — 366 or its equivalent and permission of instructor. Hendric! 



63 



170. Oral History. (3) Intensive study of select events of recent Piedmont North 
Carolina history, the preparation of sets of questions for interviews, interviews with 
Darticipants of those events, and the evaluation of these interviews as historical 
evidence. Yearns 

181, 482. Directed Reading. (3, 3) A program of extensive reading arranged with a 
ipecialist in the department in an area chosen by the student. The reading may range 
xom a broad survey of a field not previously covered by the student to an intensive 
nvestigation of a specific topic, but it may not be directly related to the student's 
hesis material. Staff 

191, 492. Thesis Research. (3, 3) Staff 

With approval of the instructor and the graduate committee, the following courses may be 
aken by history students for three hours, 400 level graduate credit: 

!31. American Art. (3) The survey of American painting from 1600 to 1900. 

M. Smith 

!33. American Architecture. (3) A survey of American architecture from 1600 to 
900, with emphasis on the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. M. Smith 

Mathematics 

Reynolda Campus 

Marcellus E. Waddill, Chairman 

Professors John V. Baxley, Richard D. Carmichael, Ivey C. Gentry, 

Fredric T. Howard, J. Gaylord May, W. Graham May, John W. Sawyer, 

Ben M. Seelbinder, Marcellus E. Waddill 

Associate Professors Elmer K. Hayashi, Ellen Kirkman, 

James Kuzmanovich 

To obtain an M. A. degree in one year, a graduate student must present evidence of 
laving completed the work required of an undergraduate who majors in mathe- 
matics in a fully accredited college or university. Such a major is understood to 
nclude at least thirty-three semester hours of mathematics, of which at least eighteen 
pquire as prerequisite one year of calculus. Students who are admitted with less than 
he level of preparation specified should expect to take additional courses at the 300 
evel and remain in residence for more than one year. 

The thirty semester hours required for the master's degree must include at least 
our courses numbered above 400, in addition to Mathematics 491, 492. An ad- 
anced course is required in each of the areas of analysis, algebra, and topology, 
■formally this requirement is met with the courses 411, 421, and 431. 

Because of the important mathematical literature in German, French, and Rus- 
ian, the student must pass a reading examination in one of these languages near the 
eginning of graduate study. The examination used is the Graduate School Foreign 
-anguage Test. In certain cases the department may prescribe an alternate method 
f meeting this requirement. 

, The department has access to a Prime 750 computer for use in teaching and 
esearch. Students desiring to use work taken in the department for graduate teacher 



64 



certification should consult the Department of Education before applying for can 
didacy. 

This program began in 1961. Departmental graduate committee: Gentry (chair 
man), Baxley, Carmichael, Howard. 



FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Computer Science 

371. Elementary Data Structures. (3) Lecture and laboratory. A course in advance( 
programming techniques, including the study of stacks, queues, lists, list processing 
and recursion. P — Computer Science 173 or 175. 

372. Data Structures. (3) Lecture and laboratory. A continuation of Compute 
Science 371, including the study of trees, graphs, sorting, searching and algorithr. 
efficiency. P — Computer Science 371. 

Mathematics 

311, 312. Advanced Calculus I, II. (3, 3) Limits and continuity in metric spaces 
differentiation and Riemann-Stieltjes integration, sequences and series, partial dif 
ferentiation and functions of real variables, implicit and inverse function theorem 
P— 113. 

317. Complex Analysis. (3) Analytic functions. Cauchy's theorem and its conse 
quences, power series, and residue calculus. P — 113. 

322. Modern Algebra II. (3) A continuation of modern abstract algebra through th 
study of additional properties of groups and fields and a thorough treatment 
vector spaces. P — 221. 

323, 324. Matrix Theory. (3, 3) Basic concepts and theorems concerning matrice! 
and real number functions defined on preferred sets of matrices. P — 121. 

332. Non-Euclidean Geometry. (3) Postulates, definitions, theorems, and models o| 
Lobachevskian and Riemannian geometry. 

345, 346. Elementary Theory of Numbers. (3, 3) Properties of integers, congru. 
ences, arithmetic functions, primitive roots, sums of squares, magic squares, applicg 
dons to elementary mathematics, quadratic residues, and arithmetic theory of cor 
tinued fractions. 

348. Combinatorial Analysis. (3) Enumeration techniques, including generatin 
functions, recurrence formulas, the principle of inclusion and exclusion, and Polya 
theorem. 

351. Applied Analysis. (3) Topics which have proven useful in the physical science: 
including vector analysis and complex analysis. 

352. Partial Differential Equations. (3) The separation of variables technique fd 
the solution of the wave, heat, Laplace, and other partial differential equations, wit 



65 



he related study of the Fourier transform and the expansion of functions in Fourier, 
^egendre, and Bessel series. 

>53. Mathematical Models. (3) Development and application of probabilistic and 
leterministic models. Emphasis given to constructing models which represent sys- 
ems in the social, behavioral, and management sciences. P — Mathematics 253 or 
Management 462. 

■55. Numerical Analysis. (3) A computer-oriented study of analytical methods in 
hathematics. Lecture and laboratory. P — 112 and 155. 

■57, 358. Mathematical Statistics. (3, 3) Probability distributions, mathematical 
xpectation, sampling distributions, estimation and testing hypotheses, regression, 
brrelation, and analysis of variance. P — 1 13. 

61. Selected Topics. (3) Topics in mathematics which are not considered in regular 
ourses. Content varies. 

81. Independent Study. (2) Library and conference work performed on an indi- 
idual basis. Open only to students with superior records. Six hours per week. 
' — Permission of staff. 



FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

,11, 412. Real Analysis. (3, 3) Measure and integration theory, elementary func- 
lonal analysis, selected advanced topics in analysis. Carmichael 

15,416. Seminar in Analysis. ( 1 , 1) Baxley 

'18. Topics in Analysis. (3) Selected topics from functional analysis or analytic 
unction theory. Baxley 

'21, 422. Abstract Algebra. (3, 3) Groups, rings, fields, extensions, Euclidean do- 
lains, polynomials, vector spaces, Galois theory. Kuzmanovich, Waddill 

123, 424. Seminar on Theory of Matrices. (1,1) Gentry 

25, 426. Seminar in Algebra. (1,1) Kirkman, Kuzmanovich 

31,432. General Topology. (3, 3) An axiomatic development of topological spaces, 
hcludes continuity, connectedness, compactness, separation, axioms, metric spaces, 
onvergence, embedding and metrization, function and quotient spaces, and com- 
ilete metric spaces. Graham May 

35, 436. Seminar on Topology (1,1) Gaylord May 

37, 438. Seminar on Geometry. (1,1) Sawyer 

45, 446. Seminar on Number Theory. (1,1) Hayashi, Howard 

52. Topics in Applied Mathematics. (3) Topics will vary and may include com- 
: utational methods in differential equations, optimization methods, approximation 
■chniques, eigenvalue problems. Baxley 



66 



458. Topics in Statistics. (3) Topics will vary and may include linear models, 
nonparametric statistics, stochastic processes. Kirkmant 

491, 492. Thesis Research. (3, 3) Staff! 

Medical Genetics 

Hawthorne Campus 

Harold O. Goodman, Head 

Professors Harold O. Goodman, C. Nash Herndon 

The Section on Medical Genetics offers work leading to the M.S. degree in medica 
sciences. The emphasis in both course work and thesis research is on genetics. Th< 
thesis topic and thesis research are dependent on the previous training and interests 
of the student. Candidates for graduate degrees are required to have a reading 
knowledge of one foreign language or special skill in computer programming on 
statistics, depending on needs and background. 

Studv leading to the M.S. in medical sciences began in 1959. 

401. Human Genetics. (2) Lectures in methodology and principles of human genet- 
ics. Topics considered include tests of genetic hypotheses, population genetics 
evolutionary changes in human populations, twin study methods, and chromosoma 
aberrations. P — One course in genetics. Offered in odd-numbered years. 

Herndon, Goodmar 

402. Medical Genetics Seminar. (1) Weeklv seminars are concerned with both 
classical and current research in medical genetics. Some seminars are presented b) 
students. P — Genetics and departmental approval. Offered in even-numbered years. 

Herndon, Goodmar 

404, 405. Advanced Topics in Human Genetics. (Credit to be arranged, 1-4) Cover: 
areas of current research interest as well as classical studies not covered in existing 
courses. Courses include independent study, assigned reading, and discussions 
P — General biochemistry and permission of instructor. Goodmar 

409, 410. Research. Bv special arrangement qualified students may participate ir 
departmental research in progress or may investigate an independent problen 
under staff supervision. 

Microbiology and Immunology 

Hawthorne Campus 

Charles E. McCall, Acting Chairman 

Professors Henry Drexler, Louis S. Kucera, Quentin N. Myrvik, 

Stephen H. Richardson 

Associate Professors Donald L. Evans, Eugene R. Heise, Arnold S. Kreger, 

Samuel H. Love 
Assistant Professors Douglas S. Lyles, Manuel J. Ricardo, Jr., Beverly Anne Weeks 

The graduate program of the department is designed to prepare students fo) 
careers of teaching and investigation in the field of microbiology and immunology 




ssociate Dean Harold O. Goodman and graduate students Eric Napper (left) and Barbara 
Westbrook working with an amino acid analyzer 



68 



The programs of studv are designed to satisfy the needs of the individual studen] 
The department offers programs leading to the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees. 
The M.S. was first offered in 1941. the Ph.D. in 1964. 

302. Medical Microbiology. (6) Host/parasite relationships of medical important 1 
and the principles of infection and immunity studied and discussed. The cours 
provides the student with the fundamentals of microbiology needed for continue 
study of the mechanisms, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of infectious disease] 
A studv is made of fungi, bacteria, viruses, rickettsiae, and animal parasites. P-f 
Organic chemistrv (two semesters) Kreger. Staij 

304. Introduction to Immunology. (3) A lecture/laboratory course dealing win 
fundamental concepts of immune responses. The development of cellular anj 
humoral immune responses and their regulation are considered in relation to inf& 
tious disease, allergy, tissue transplantation, neoplasia, autoimmune disease, an] 
immuno-deficiencv. Also considered are the properties of antigens and immune! 
globulins, immunologic specificitv, and methods of monitoring immune response! 
The laboratorv is designed to provide practical experience with basic immunolog! 
techniques. (2-2) McCall. Staj 

401. Basic Animal Virology. (4) A lecture/laboratorv course which deals with basl 
aspects of virus structure and biologic functions, principles of virus replication 
antiviral agents, genetics of viruses, and consequences of virus/cell interactions. Trl 
laboratorv sessions are designed to give the student experience in fundament! 
techniques involving tissue culture, virus growth kinetics, virus assav. and macrtj 
molecular synthesis. (2-4) P — Permission of instructors. Lyles, KuceJ 

402. Advanced Topics in Virology. (3) A lecture/conference course designed 
provide a concentrated analysis of current published research knowledge, particij 
larlv as related to oncogenic viruses. Course content changes with recent advances i 
knowledge and student background and interests. In regard to course contenJ 
emphasis placed on experimental design, methodology, interpretation of data, anj 
relevance to an understanding of regulation of viral gene expression, virus/host eel 
interaction, and oncogenesis. Presentations and discussions demand active studeu 
participation. P — 401 or permission of instructor. Kucera, Staj 

403. Pathogenesis of Infectious Diseases. (3) A comprehensive course dealing wiJ 
microorganisms associated with infectious diseases and with host/parasite intera! 
tions. The mechanisms bv which microorganisms circumvent host defenses an! 
produce disease in man emphasized. Areas discussed include incidence and ged 
graphic distribution of the disease, epidemiologic factors and principles, tisstl 
tropism of the infectious agent, and the roles of microbial products in elicitirl 
histological, biochemical, and physiological pathologv. P — 302 and biochemistry (I 
equivalent. Offered in odd-numbered years. Kreger. Staj 

404. General Microbiology. (6) A comprehensive course dealing with microorgarj 
isms not normally associated with diseases. The taxonomy, cytology, genetics, phyl 
iology, and ecology of these organisms are emphasized. P — Organic chemistry (twjj 
semesters); C— Biochemistry. Offered in fall. Richardson. Lo\ 



69 

:06. Microbial Genetics. (4) The structure, inheritance, phenotvpic expression, 
nd mutation of deoxyribonucleic acid are discussed, with special emphasis on the 
ole of microorganisms as a tool in elucidating these characteristics. Specific genetic 
nechanisms found in bacteriophage and bacteria are examined in detail. In addition 
b the normal lecture program, each student presents a seminar on a particular 
jspect of microbial genetics. P — 301 or 302 or equivalent. Offered in even-numbered 
fars. Drexler 

07. Ultrastructure of Microbial and Mammalian Cells. (4) Acquaints the student 
lit:h the various techniques involved in the preparation of biological specimens for 
fudy with the electron microscope. The student gains experience in the operation of 
he electron microscope and observes demonstrations of cytochemical techniques 
nd the application of antigen/antibody markers. (2-4) P — Permission of instructor. 

Leake 

08. Biology of Neoplasia. (3) A multidisciplinary lecture/conference course deal- 
1g with the cell biologv, molecular biology, and therapy of neoplasia. Emphasis on 
resentation of experimental research models and survey of current literature 
lertaining to neoplasia. P — Biology or microbiology, immunologv, biochemistry 
fisirable. Offered in odd-numbered years. Sethi, Kucera 

09. Introduction to Clinical Immunology. (4) A lecture/laboratory course con- 
erned with the clinical applications of immunology. Topics include histocompatibil- 
fy, mechanisms of acquired immunity to infectious diseases, mechanisms of 
ypersensitivity to induced disease, autoimmune diseases, immuno-deficiency syn- 
romes, and tumor/host relationships. (3-2) P— 304 or permission of instructor. 
ffered in even-numbered years. Heise, Staff 

11. Cellular Basis of Immunology. (4) An extensive lecture/discussion course 
Dnsidering the cellular basis for immune responses. Intended for advanced students 
f immunology, this course emphasizes new information and experimental design 
om the current literature. P — 304 or equivalent. Offered in odd-numbered years. 

Ricardo, Staff 
13, 414. Microbiological Techniques. (1-4) An advanced laboratory course in the 
i.eory and practical applications of clinical microbiology. Intensive study of the 
rocedures and techniques used in the diagnosis and treatment of infectious agents 
•e provided in the lab. Emphasis on problem solving and laboratory correlation with 
inical disease. P— Biology 326 or Microbiology 301 and 302. Wasilauskas 

15, 416. Seminar in Microbiology. (1,1) Current research problems and reviews of 
e literature presented weekly by graduate students. 

17, 418. Seminar in Immunology. (1,1) Current research problems and reviews of 
;e literature presented weekly by graduate students. 

9, 420. Research in Microbiology. (Credit to be arranged.) 

il9. Research in Microbiology. (Credit to be arranged.) Research training offered 
1 graduate students with faculty advisers in a tutorial system. Summer. 

:l, 422. Teacher Training. (No credit) Graduate students assist in preparation for 



70 



the medical microbiology course except during the semester thev are taking i 
Advanced graduate students teach laboratory sections in medical microbiology 
minimum of three semesters and are expected to give lectures in other courss 
offered by the department. (Students receiving University funds are assigned add| 
tional teaching duties.) P — Advanced standing. 

Diagnostic Clinical Microbiology. See Pathology 418. 

Neuropsychology 

Hawthorne Campus 

Frank B. Wood, Head 

Associate Professor Frank B. Wood 

401. Neuropsychology and Learning Disabilities. (3) Language, perceptual/moto 
memory, attentional, and emotional deficits arising from neuropsychological factoi 
are studied in the context of brain functioning and information processing an' 
applied to learning disabilities in children, in both theoretical and practical term 
P — Permission of instructor. (Same course as Psychology 467.) Woe* 

453. Psychophysiology of Disease Processes. (3) Physiological responsivity to b<; 
havioral events is reviewed in the current research literature. Disease states — espc 
daily those involving the cardiovascular, muscle, and central nervous systems — am 
biofeedback and other therapeutic technologies are especially emphasized. P-' 
Permission of instructor and of student's major department. Woo 

482. Readings and Research in Psychology. (1, 2, or 3) Allows the graduate sti 
dent, working under the supervision of a faculty member, to pursue and receiv 
credit for a special reading project in an area not covered by regular courses or 
special research project not related to the master's thesis. Supervising faculty merit 
ber and hours credit for which enrolled determined bv graduate committee prior 
registration. Fall and spring. (Same course as Psychology 482.) Woo 

Pathology 

Hawthorne Campus 

Robert W. Prichard, Chairman 

Professors Robert W. Prichard, Richard W. St. Clair 

Associate Professors Jon C. Lewis, Zakariya K. Shihabi, Alberto Trillo, 

Benedict L. Wasilauskas 

Assistant Professors Jean N. Angelo, John W. Hartz, Mary Ruth McMahan 

This department, in conjunction with the Department of Comparative Medicim 
offers a program in comparative and experimental pathologv leading to the M.S. an 
Ph.D. degrees. (See Interdisciplinary Program.) 

402. Fundamentals of Pathology. (3) An introduction to the principles of diseas 
with special emphasis on mechanisms of cellular and tissue responses. The fir 
portion of the course deals with methods of study; cellular pathobiology and mech; 
nisms of inflammatory response; and genetic, immune, and infectious disorder 
The second portion is concerned with disorders of cellular differentiation an 



growth, disorders of circulation, metabolic disorders, and aging. Exposure to human 
tross pathology is provided during the course. P — Histology or permission of in- 
Jtructor. Offered in the fall. Trillo, Staff 

|l0. Pathologic Biochemistry. (2) A lecture course designed to present concepts of 
liochemical changes associated with disease processes. It is meant to provide the 
tudent with examples of various ways in which biochemical changes can cause 
lisease or result from disease. The course is not designed as a survey of all the 
'iochemical disorders that have been described; emphasis is on the intensive discus- 
ion of examples of different mechanisms of biochemical alterations associated with 
isease. Examples of biochemical disorders affecting the following systems are 
onsidered: disorders of protein, amino acid, and carbohydrate metabolism; endo- 
•rine disorders; lipid storage diseases; disorders of metal, porphyrin, heme metabo- 
'sm and hemostasis; diseases of muscle and connective tissue. P — General biochemis- 
ry or 391 or equivalent. Offered in even-numbered years. St. Clair, McMahan, Lewis 

,15, 416. Advanced Topics in Pathology. (Credit to be arranged, 1-5) An advanced 
ecture and student participation course dealing with areas of new knowledge in 
athobiology. Course content may change with recent advances in knowledge. Four 
;mesters may be taken for credit. P— General pathology, Comparative Medicine 
K)l, or permission of instructor. Offered jointly with the Department of Compara- 
ve Medicine. Staff 

.17. Pathobiology of Atherosclerosis. (4) A lecture course exploring intensively the 
•athogenetic mechanisms which underlie this most prevalent human disease. Broad 
pas studied include human atherosclerosis as a disease process (natural history and 
actors affecting extent and severity of atherosclerosis in man), approaches to the 
::udy of pathogenesis in man (animal models, homeostasis of serum lipid levels, 
rterial metabolism, clotting mechanisms and thrombosis, experimental myocardial 
pfarction), and the scientific basis for therapy in atherosclerosis (surgery, sterol 
mthesis inhibitors, chelating agents). P — General biochemistry, general pathology, 
r equivalent. Clarkson, Staff 

18. Diagnostic Clinical Microbiology. (2) A didactic course designed to provide 
pe student with an understanding of basic concepts of infectious disease and how 
ley relate to clinical microbiology. Emphasis is on the role of the clinical microbiolo- 
hst in the proper collection of specimens, interpretation of laboratory results, and 
Section of appropriate antimicrobial agents. P — Microbiology 302 or equivalent. 
ffered in odd-numbered years. Wasilauskas 

27, 428. Comparative and Experimental Pathology Seminar. (1,1) Seminars on 
jjpics of current interest are offered weekly by graduate students, staff, and visiting 
icturers. Staff 

29, 430. Research. Research opportunities are available in comparative and ex- 
erimental pathology projects conducted in the Department of Comparative Medi- 
ine or in the Department of Pathology or jointly. 

licrobiological Techniques. See Microbiology 413, 414. Staff 



Physical Education 

Reynolda Campus 

William L. Hottinger, Chairman 

Professors William L. Hottinger, Paul M. Ribisl 

Assistant Professors Sarah Hutslar, Steve Messier, W. Jack Rejeski 

The Department of Physical Education offers a 15 month program leading to th ; 
Master of Arts degree. This program offers a specialization in the area of exercis 
and sport science and is designed for those who are interested in careers in exercis i 
and sport science research, preventive and rehabilitative programs and/or furthe 
graduate study. 

Candidates for the Exercise and Sport Science Program are not required to hav 
an undergraduate major or minor in physical education; however, an undergradi 
ate concentration in the sciences is preferred. Candidates for the program generall 
pursue research careers in exercise science laboratories (exercise physiolog; 
biomechanics or rehabilitation) and/or direct programs of exercise training or reJ 
habilitation (YMCAs, industrial fitness programs and cardiac rehabilitation). Thj 
prerequisites for this program include course work in human physiology, physiolog 
of exercise and kinesiology. These courses should be completed before admission 1 1 
the program, but with departmental approval they may be completed during th 
regular course of study. None of the prerequisites may apply toward the graduat 
degree. All students in the program are required to take the following courses: 4 If I 
42 1 , 433, 463, 464, 465, 466, 480 and 49 1-92. This is a 1 5 month program for thirtj 
hours of credit; candidates are expected to arrive on campus for the summer sessio' 
before the regular academic year and to remain through the summer session after th' I 
academic year. 

An opportunity for certification as Exercise Test Technologist through the Amei I 
ican College of Sports Medicine is made available through this program each sum I 
mer. Candidates are encouraged to complete this certification in their first summf I 
session. In addition, the Departments of Medicine and Physical Education ha\J 
joined in a cooperative effort to sponsor a cardiac rehabilitation program for patient 
in the community with documented coronary disease. Each graduate student has th 
opportunity for an internship in this program in the dual capacities of exercis I 
technician and exercise leader. This internship also includes a similar experienc -| 
with the preventive programs for adult men and women. The candidates for th » 
program are also expected to teach one departmental course each semester in th 
foundations of health and physical activity in order to fulfill the special skill requin I 
ment for graduation. 

The Department of Physical education began offering graduate study in 1961' 
Departmental graduate committee: Ribisl (chairman), Hottinger. Hutslar, Messie 1 
Rejeski. 



FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATE STUDENTS 
360. Evaluation and Measurement in Health and Physical Education. (3) Preseni 



73 

measurement techniques and beginning statistical procedures, to determine pupil 
status in established standards of health and physical education which reflect prevail- 
ng educational philosophy. Rejeski 

J63. Personal and Community Health and Safety Education. (3) A study of person- 
al and community health needs of school age children and methods of administering 
physical education programs for special students. Hutslar 

970. Biomechanics of Human Movement. (3) The study of the internal and exter- 
nal forces which act on the human body and the effects produced by these forces. 
Principles of physics will be applied to specific sport skills. P — 352. Messier 

182. Independent Study in Health and Physical Education. (1-3) Library confer- 
ences and laboratory research performed on an individual basis. Staff 

FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

tl5. Qualitative Research Design. (3) A study of the various types of research 
■•elevant to physical education and sport. While attention is given to topics such as 
statistical treatment of data, the primary emphasis involves discussion concerning 
hreats to internal and external validity for experimental and quasi-experimental 
iesigns. In conjunction with a sound methodological approach, practical experi- 
ences are provided in the preparation and presentation of thesis proposals. Rejeski 

121. Data Analysis and Interpretation. (3) The application of basic statistical tech- 
niques in the analysis and interpretation of data in scientific research. Topics include 
lescriptive statistics, simple linear and multiple correlation/regression analysis, t- 
jests, analysis of variance and co-variance, and non-parametric statistics. Ribisl 

133. The Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity. (3) A comprehensive analysis 
*>f psychological issues pertaining to sport and physical activity, including a discus- 
sion of the major approach within psychology related to a variety of content areas 
'elevant to sport such as motivation, stress, and aggression. Consideration is given to 
! he meaning and future role of sport in American society. Rejeski 

163. Advanced Biomechanics. (3) An in-depth study of the mechanical principles 
i-hich influence human movement. Topics include the study of kinetics, kinematics, 
inematography, electromyography, and electrogoniometry. P — anatomy, kinesiolo- 
,y, physics or permission of instructor. Summer only. Messier 

64. Nutrition and Weight Control. (3) A study of the problem of obesity and 
nalnourishment in modern society and analysis of the causative factors. Current 
esearch findings on the influence of genetics, eating behavior, and activity patterns 
pon nutrition and weight control examined. Laboratory experiences include analy- 

Ss of diet, assessment of body composition, methods of diet prescription, and 
ehavioral modification as means of intervention in obesity and coronary heart 
isease. Ellis, Rejeski, Ribisl 

65. Graded Exercise Testing and Evaluation of Work Capacity. (3) The study of 
le rationale for the use of graded exercise testing in the evaluation of functional 



74 



work capacity. Lectures include the analysis of different modes of evaluation: tread! 
mill, bicycle ergometer, arm ergometer, and field testing, with the application of th 
results in the evaluation of normal and cardiac patients. Laboratory experience 
include the use of electrocardiogram ergometers and metabolic analysers in th 
assessment of functional capacity. Summer only. Ribi; 

466. Principles of Exercise Prescription. (3) The study of basic physiological priri, 
ciples in the prescription of exercise for individuals of differing age and health statu; I 
Emphasis on the design of safe and effective programs of physical activity, utilizin 
sound principles of exercise prescription in conjunction with pertinent informatiol 
on medical historv and functional work capacity. Ribi; 

480. Advanced Topics in Exercise and Sport Science. (3) This course is divided int 
two or more topic areas to allow an in-depth treatment of selected topics which ar 
not a regular part of required course work. Topics may include study from th 
following broad areas of concentration: administration of programs, anatomy 
biomechanics/kinesiology, computer analysis, physiology of exercise, and psvcholog j 
of physical activity. Seminar and/or laboratory approach. Messier, Rejeski, Ribi: 

482. Independent Study in Physical Education. ( 1-3) Literature and/or laboratorJ 
research performed on an individual basis under the supervision of a faculty merr 
ber. Stall 

483, 484. Seminar in Physical Education. (0) Designed to bring all graduate sttj 
dents and graduate faculty together on a regular basis to discuss research proposal: 
research designs and studies, results of research, and current topics in related areaj 
of research. Graduate students and faculty are expected to present research propos 
als and results for critique and discussion. Ribi; j 

491, 492. Thesis Research (3, 3) Stall 



Physics 

Reynolda Campus 

George P. Williams, Chairman 

Professors Robert W. Brehme, Ysbrand Haven, Howard W. Shields, 

George P. Williams Jr. 

Associate Professor William C. Kerr 

Assistant Professor George Eric Matthews 

The Department of Phvsics strives to provide the professional opportunity 
usually associated with large research universities while maintaining the atmosphei 
of a small liberal arts university with an ideal faculty/student ratio. Graduate woi 
leading to the M.S. degree is offered in a program designed to meet the needs 
students with various professional goals. The favorable facultv/student ratio satisfy 
students who want a more personal tvpe of introductory graduate study befoi 
entering a Ph.D. program elsewhere. There is also a program to meet the requir 
ments of students who seek the M.S. degree as an ultimate academic goal befoi 
going on to teaching or scientific industrial work. The flexibility of the progra; 



75 

allows students with deficiencies in academic background to obtain sufficient prepa- 
ration to qualify for admission to graduate schools at larger universities. 

The entering student is expected to have a sound knowledge of undergraduate 
mechanics, electricity and magnetism, thermodynamics, and atomic and nuclear 
physics. Provision is made to allow deficiencies to be remedied. The course of study 
for each student is planned in conference with the graduate adviser after evaluation 
pf academic background and experience. 

The student's course of study must include Physics 411, 412, and 441, as well as 
participation in departmental seminars. These seminars, in fields of special interest, 
&re regularly scheduled and are often conducted by outside speakers. In addition to 
ptisfying the residence and course requirements, the student must be admitted to 
pndidacy, complete an acceptable thesis under faculty supervision, and pass an oral 
?xamination in its defense. Although a full-time student with no deficiencies may 
pOmpIete the degree requirements in one year and one summer, a student who serves 
AS as assistant ordinarily takes two years to complete the degree. 
i A Wake Forest undergraduate may essentially complete the requirements in one 
/ear even as a teaching assistant by following the schedule outlined in the five year 
B.A./M.S. program (see College bulletin). 

' Candidates for degrees are expected to meet the foreign language and special skills 
l equirement by submitting satisfactory scores on the French or German Graduate 
School Foreign Language Test. In certain cases with departmental approval, another 
skill, typically computer programming, may be substituted. 

i The graduate faculty of the Department of Physics is engaged in research in 
heoretical physics and experimental solid state physics (including biophysical ap- 
plications). Well equipped laboratories are available for the experimental programs. 
Additional auxiliary instrumentation includes an X-ray diffraction spectrometer, an 
;lectron-spin resonance spectrometer, and a mass spectrometer. Computer facilities 
include a 21 14 Hewlett-Packard computer with a plotter and a curve-fitting oscillo- 
icope, a Hewlett-Packard 3000, and terminal access to the IBM 370/165 installation 
it the North Carolina Research Triangle. 

The program began in 196 1 . Departmental graduate committee: Williams (chair- 
nan) and all staff. 



FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATE STUDENTS 



111. Classical Mechanics. (3) A senior-level treatment of analytic classical mechan- 

:s. 

112. Electromagnetic Theory. (3) A senior-level treatment of classical electromag- 
letic theory. 

'31, 332. Acoustics I, II. (3, 3) A study of the fundamental principles and applica- 
;Ons of the generation, transmission, and reception of sound and its interaction with 
arious media. 

43, 344. Modern Physics. (3, 3) Application of the elementary principles of quan- 
-im mechanics to atomic and molecular physics. 




Audrey Rudd, graduate student in physiology, performs renal surgery on a rat 



77 



J45, 346. Modern Physics Laboratory. (1,1) The laboratory associated with Physics 
543, 344. 

$51. Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics. (3) A study of the laws of thermo- 
dynamics and the kinetic theory of molecular motion. Offered in the spring of odd- 
mmbered years. 

152. Physical Optics and Spectra. (4) A study of physical optics and the quantum 
reatment of spectra. Offered in the fall of even-numbered years. 

$81, 382. Research. (3, 3) Library, conference, and laboratory work performed on 
in individual basis. 



FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

111. Classical Mechanics. (3) A study of variational principles and LeGrange's 
equations, the rigid body equations of motion, the Hamilton equations of motion 
md canonical transformations, Hamilton-Jacobi theory, and applications to con- 
inuous systems and fields. Brehme. Kerr 

H2. Electromagnetism. (3) A study of Maxwell's Equations, boundary value prob- 
ems for the electromagnetic field, and radiation; the ponderomotive equation for 
he charged particle. Brehme, Kerr 

Ml, 442. Quantum Mechanics. (3, 3) The study of the foundations of modern 
quantum theory, with an emphasis on the meaning of the wave equation, operators, 
:igenfunctions, eigenvalues, commutators, matrix mechanics, spin, and scattering. 

Kerr 

152. Solid State Physics. (3) An introductory course including the structure of 
Derfect crystalline solids, their thermal electronic properties, the free electron and 
Dand theory of metals, imperfect crystals, transport properties, and semiconductors. 

Haven, Matthews, Williams 

155. Magnetic Properties of Solids. (2) Diamagnetism, paramagnetism, and ferro- 
nagnetism treated, with a special emphasis on application of nuclear and spin 
•esonance techniques. Shields 

156. Seminar on Defects in the Solid State. (2) The generation and interactions of 
joint and line defects such as color centers, vacancies, and dislocations treated. 

Haven, Matthews, Williams 

170. Statistical Mechanics. (3) An introduction to probability theory and to the 
)hysics of systems containing large numbers of particles from the classical as well as 
he quantum point of view. Haven 

180. Theory of General Relativity. (3) A study of the covariant formulation of 
physical laws in mechanics and electromagnetism. Brehme 

185. Topics in Theoretical Physics. (3) Selected topics of current interest in 
heoretical physics not included in other courses. Brehme, Kerr 

191, 492. Thesis Research. (3, 3) Staff 



78 

Physiology and Pharmacology 

Hawthorne Campus 

Alvin Brodish, Chairman 

Professors Alvin Brodish, Vardaman M. Buckalew Jr., 

Ivan W. F. Davidson, Phillip M. Hutchins, N. Sheldon Skinner Jr. 

Associate Professors David A. Blizard, Samuel A. Deadwyler, 

John S. Kaufmann, Melvin Levitt, 

Maw-Shung Liu, Jack W. Strandhoy 

Assistant Professors Claud E. Dunlap HI, J. Charles Eldridge, 

Philip W. Landfield, John R. Lymangrover, Mariana Morris, 

Darwin W. Peterson, James C. Rose, David K. Sundberg 

The Department of Physiology and Pharmacology offers separate degree pro- 
grams in both disciplines. The graduate programs provide advanced courses and 
seminars in physiology and pharmacology for students who hold a B.A., B.S., onj 
higher degree and who seek a Ph.D. degree with intent to pursue an academic or, I 
research career. Graduate study leading primarily toward the M.S. degree is avail- 
able only to those who hold the M.D. or D. V.M. degree, or to medical students who 
have completed two years of the medical curriculum. Preference for admission id 
given to students with more complete preparation. 

The program of study is individualized to meet student needs. Students arel 
expected to obtain a broad background in physiology and pharmacology and in 
related sciences by taking introductory courses. Through selected advanced courses 
and seminars the student is offered the opportunity of exploring topics intensively.' 

After acquiring basic knowledge of physiology and pharmacology and developing 
fundamental skills and techniques of investigation, a student embarks on an area of 
research which is the basis of a thesis. The research program is guided by the adviser ] 
and a departmental thesis committee. 

Current research interests of the departmental staff are mainly in the areas of I 
physiology and pharmacology of the cardiovascular, renal, endocrine, and nervous 
systems. 

The M.S. degree has been offered since 1941, the Ph.D. since 1962. 



CORE COURSES IN PHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY 



301. Medical Pharmacology. (8) This portion of the interdisciplinary course Intro- 
duction to Medicine presents an analysis of the effects of drug groups on the physiolog- 
ical and biochemical functions of the human. (See Interdisciplinary Courses.) P— 
392 - Brodish, Staff 

392. Medical Physiology. (7) The program in physiology is intended to provide 
students with a knowledge and understanding of the function of the major systems of 
the body and how these systems are coordinated and regulated. Lectures, laborato- 
ries, and conferences emphasize the major physiological principles and concepts 
required to understand organ system function as it relates to medicine. After initial 



79 



introduction to basic cellular and membrane function, systematic analysis of car- 
diovascular, respiratory, digestive, and renal function is followed by analysis of the 
role of the regulatory and integrative endocrine and nervous systems. P — 
Biochemistry 391. Brodish, Staff 

393. Abnormal Physiology. (4) This portion of the interdisciplinary course Introduc- 
tion to Medicine includes abnormal function of the organ systems as seen in diseased 
states. (See Interdisciplinary Courses.) P — 392. Brodish, Staff 

481, 482. Advanced Topics. (1-6) An advanced lecture and conference course 
which considers various topics of current research interest and concepts under rapid 
development. Areas of interest within the department are covered on a rotating 
basis. Additional topics can be offered by announcement. Offered in 1982—83: 
■Cardiovascular. Topics under current investigation or recent advances in areas not 
overed in the regular seminar schedule or in the regularly planned elective courses. 
Students give reviews and discussions of papers presented at scientific meetings 
Which they have attended. P — 392. Hutchins 

I — Renal, Endocrine, Neural, Cardiovascular. Rotating topic coverage on physiologic 
and pharmacologic topics supplemented with lectures bv visiting scientists. P — 
'Permission of instructor. Brodish, Staff 

495,496. Seminar. (0, 0)Departmental seminars are presented bv graduate students 
and staff. They provide coverage of subjects not included in the other graduate 
courses and serve as a research forum for presentation of research proposals, work in 
progress, and completed work by staff and by post- and pre-doctoral trainees. 
Visiting scientists are scheduled at regular intervals. Staff 



ADVANCED COURSES IN PHYSIOLOGY 

395. Pathophysiology of Hypertension. (1) A lecture course presenting the basic 
pathophysiological mechanisms of hypertension. A portion is devoted to intensive 
analysis of topics of current interest in hypertension research. P — Permission of 
instructor. Summer. Hutchins, Staff 

415. Sensory Neurobiology. (3) (1 hour major credit allowed for physiology stu- 
dents.) (See Interdisciplinary Courses.) 

431. Cardiac Physiology and Pathophysiology. (3) Lectures and discussions of 
inormal and abnormal cardiac physiology at the cellular, isolated muscle, and organ 
levels. P — 392. Peterson, Staff 

432. Vascular Physiology and Pathophysiology. (3) Lectures and discussions of 
.normal and abnormal vascular physiology in the macro- and micro-circulation. 
P— 392. Hutchins, Staff 

442. Endocrinology. (2) Recent advances in endocrinology, with emphasis on en- 
docrine regulatory and controlling mechanisms, hormonal interrelationships, and 
mechanisms of hormonal action at the cellular level. P — 392. Brodish, Staff 



80 

461. Integrative Neurophysiology. (2) Special topics in neurobiology, treated in the 
manner of seminars. These include sensory, motor, associative, and arousal fund 
tions of the vertebrate nervous system. P— 392 or permission of instructor. Levitt 
463. Nerve Cell Physiology and Plasticity. (2 or 3) Consideration of basic neuro- 
biologies! events related to neurone function. Emphasis will be given to topics dealing! 
with morphological, chemical, and physiological plasticity at the synaptic level iri 
various mammalian neural systems. Seminar arrangement includes student presen- 
tation of research papers that can serve as a background for continued graduate 
work in these areas. P — 392. Deadwylerl 

465. Metabolism in Health and Disease. (2) Lectures and discussions of cellular! 
metabolism as correlated with physiological functions of various tissues and organs.! 
Special emphasis on the physiological mechanisms that control metabolic adaptations 
of liver, adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and heart during exercise, ischemia, circulaJ 
tory shock, varying nutritional states, and diabetes mellitus. P— Biochemistry 391. 
general biochemistry, or equivalent. I R . 

467. Physiology of Aging. (2) Seminar on the physiology of aging. Presentations on 
current topics relevant to age-dependent changes in various organ systems and] 
theories of aging. P— 392. Landfield 

471. Renal Function and Electrolyte Balance. (2) Recent advances and ex-j 
perimental approaches to the study of renal physiology, with emphasis on thdl 
research literature. P — 392. BuckalewJ 

491. Research Methods: Medical Electronics. (2) Discussions and demonstrations 
covering the basic principles of electrical circuits, electron vacuum tubes, semi- 
conductor devices, and electronic equipment commonly used in physiological re-| 
search - Hutchins 

494. Research Methods: Physiology. (2) Discussions, demonstrations, and practical] 
laboratory experience covering the uses and limitations of the more commonly used! 
research equipment and techniques in the areas of physiology. P — B.S. degree. Staff) 

497, 498. Research. Opportunities are available for collaborative or independent 
research on physiological problems, including research in preparation for the thesis.] 

Staff 



ADVANCED COURSES IN PHARMACOLOGY 



400. Advanced Pharmacology. (4) A course of lecture/discussions organized to meet 
the needs of individual students and to correct deficiencies. Possible topics include 
molecular pharmacology, drug metabolism, drug action and enzyme induction, 
cardiovascular, endocrinological, and neurological pharmacology, biologically active 1 
polypetides, and pharmacology of electrolyte balance and of renal function.) 
C— 301. Davidson, Staff! 

402. Cardiovascular Pharmacology. (2) Readings and discussions center around 
recent developments in drug groups affecting the heart and circulation, with particu-. 
lar emphasis on the experimental approach. P— 301 and Physiology 392. 

Davidson, Staff 






81 

[404. Endocrinological Pharmacology. (2) A course of lectures and seminars examin- 
ing the concepts of pharmacological actions and the use of natural and synthetic 
hormones and drugs with hormonal action. P — 301 and Physiology 392. 

Davidson, Eldridge 

406. Neuropharmacology. (2) Readings and discussions concerned with the major 
:lasses of drugs acting primarily on the central nervous system. Emphasis on research 
Jn this area and the methods used. P — 301. Dunlap 

408. Biochemical Pharmacology. (3) A series of lectures, discussions, and laborato- 
ries integrating the topics of drug metabolism and pharmacodynamics, pharma- 
cogenetics, molecular pharmacology, and biochemical toxicology. Designed to give 
students in pharmacology and other disciplines an intensive understanding of the 
action of drugs at a cellular level. Dunlap 

111. Pharmacology of Electrolyte Balance and Renal Function. (2) Reading of 
original papers, monographs, reviews, and discussions acquaints the student with the 
use of drugs and hormonal substances which affect the renal control of electrolyte 
and water balance. Emphasis on the experimental approach and the mechanism of 
action. P — Physiology 392. Strandhoy 

413. Research Methods in Pharmacology. (3) Discussions, demonstrations, and 
practical laboratory experience covering the uses and limitations of some commonly 
used techniques and procedures in pharmacology. Staff 

414. Applied Pharmacology. (4) An introduction to the application of pharmaco- 
logic principles in man; intensive study of how appropriate selection and evaluation 
pf methods used to assess drug absorption, distribution, disposition, therapeutic 
sfficacy, and side effects in man are made. Laboratory is comprised of conferences, 
independent library research, and ward experiences relating to critical evaluation of 
actions, interactions, and adverse reactions of drugs in clinical cases. Faculty from 
:linical departments discuss cases in their areas of expertise. P — Medical pharmacol- 
ogy or equivalent. Kaufmann 

423, 424. Research. (Credit to be arranged) Current areas of investigation available 
ire cardiovascular and renal pharmacology, endocrinology, chemical pharmacology, 
jrug metabolism, and neuropharmacology. Staff 

Psychology 

Reynolda Campus 

John E. Williams, Chairman 

Professors Robert C. Beck, Robert H. Dufort, Charles L. Richman, 

John E. Williams 

Associate Professors David W. Catron, Philippe R. Falkenberg, David Allen Hills 

Assistant Professors Deborah L. Best, Cecilia Solano 

Adjunct Assistant Professor Frank B. Wood 

Lecturer Brian M. Austin 

i 

; The Department of Psychology offers graduate work leading to a research- 
>riented general master's degree. The general M.A. degree is defined as one which 



82 



emphasizes the scientific, theoretical, and research bases common to all areas o 
psychology and which exposes students to a variety of both pure science (e.g 
learning, motivation, perception, personality, statistics) and applied science (e.g. 
testing, behavior modification, clinical psychology) content areas. 

The program is designed for capable students who (1) expect to continue to th 
Ph.D. degree but wish to begin graduate work in a department where they receive.: 
high degree of individual attention from the faculty, (2) do not have adequat 
background for direct entrance into a Ph.D. program because they are deficient I 
either the number or kind of undergraduate psychology courses taken and wish ti! 
complete their undergraduate preparation as they begin graduate work, or (3) wisl! 
to terminate graduate work with the master's degree. 

The program is not specifically designed to train students to be master's lev. 
clinical or counseling psychologists. Students with strong interests in these are; 
should recognize when they apply that in this program they will master the genera 1 
field of psychology, including research methods and theory, prior either to working 
at the M.A. level (graduates of this program have obtained positions in schod 
systems, mental health clinics, colleges, state hospitals, and research settings) oi 
proceeding to specialization at the Ph.D. level. Students who wish to receive special 
ized training as master's level clinicians should apply to other schools which offei 
such programs, and students who wish to be trained specifically as master's leve 
counselors should apply either to other schools or to the counseling program in th] 
Department of Education. Potential applicants are asked to consider carefully thei 
interest in the above listed professional options before they apply to the psycholog 
program. 

The applicant is expected to have an undergraduate major in psychology at ai 
accredited institution. Such a major includes courses in experimental psychology.! 
statistics, and history and systems of psychology, with a well rounded selection 1 
other psychology courses. Students who are judged to be deficient in these aspect- 
are required to remedy such deficiencies after entering the Graduate School. It i 
advisable for the applicant to have a substantial background in other laboratorj 
sciences, mathematics, and philosophy, in addition to courses in psychology. 

The department has unusually good facilities and library materials for research] 
The areas in which research is currently being conducted include learning, motiv* 
tion, perception, personality, cognitive processes, social and child-developmentai 
psychology, and neuropsychology. In addition to the departmental facilities, thi 
University has a computer center for teaching and research. 

Though it is possible to obtain the master's degree in one calendar year, mos ( 
students take two academic years to complete the program. Students who hole 
assistantships are required to spend two years in residence. In addition to satisfying 
the University requirements for the degree, all graduate students must write a majl 
research paper and pass a departmental qualifying examination. This examinatioi 
serves as the department's special skills requirement. 

The M.A. degree has been offered since 1964. Departmental graduate committee 
Dufort (chairman), Beck, Richman, Solano, Williams (ex officio). 



83 



FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATE STUDENTS 

313. History and Systems of Psychology. (3) The development of psychological 
:hought and research from ancient Greece to present trends, with emphasis on 
Intensive examination of original sources. P — 211 or permission of instructor. 

B20. Physiological Psychology. (3) Neurophysiological and neuroanatomical ex- 

blanations of behavior. P — 21 1. 

i 

323. Animal Behavior. (3) A survey of laboratory and field research on animal 

pehavior. P — Permission of instructor. 

$26. Learning Theory and Research. (3) Theoretical and experimental issues in the 
Psychology of learning. P — 2 1 1 . 

529. Perception. (3) Survey of theory and research findings on various sensory 
iystems (vision, hearing, touch, taste). P — 211. 

{33. Fundamentals of Human Motivation. (3) Description and analysis of some 
iundamental motivational phenomena, with special reference to human problems, 
includes reward and punishment, conflict, anxiety, affection, needs for achievement 
ind power, aggression, creativity, and curiosity. P — 151. 

$41. Research in Child Development. (3) Methodological issues and selected re- 
search in child development. Research projects required. P — 211. 

142. Current Issues in Developmental Psychology. (3) Intensive examination of 
elected theoretical or research issues in this area. P — 21 1 and 241. 

543. Developmental Disorders. (1) Delayed or distorted neural development stud- 
ed in relation to major disturbances of learning and behavior in children and in the 
iging. P— 2 1 1 . 

151. Personality Research. (3) The application of a variety of research procedures to 
'he study of human personality. Research projects required. P — 211. 

555. Research in Social Psychology. (3) Methodological issues and selected research 
n the study of the human as a social animal. Field research projects required. P — 2 1 1 . 

158. Psychology of Woman. (3) Intensive study of the behavior of women and its 
aersonal application, including consideration of biological, social, and motivational 
actors. P — 151. 

561. Operant Conditioning and Behavior Modification. (3) Principles, theory, and 
experimental research in operant learning, with applications to the modification of 
>ehavior in various populations and situations. P — 21 1. 

162. Psychological Tests and Measurements. (3) Theory and application of psycho- 
ogical assessment procedures in the areas of intelligence, aptitude, vocational in- 
erest, and personality. P — 211. 

•63. Survey of Clinical Psychology. (3) An overview of the field of clinical psycholo- 
iy. P — Permission of instructor. 



84 

369. Contemporary Applications of Psychology. (3) Supervised field experience ii 
applied psychology. P — 211 and permission of instructor. 

378. Instrumentation for Psychological Research. (1) Lecture/demonstration pre 
sentation of electrical and mechanical equipment, followed by practical application 1 
small group project work. Assumes no prior knowledge of electricity or construction! 
P — Permission of instructor. 

392. Contemporary Problems in Psychology. (3) Seminar treatment of curren' 
theory and research in several frontier areas of psychology. Principally for senio' 
majors planning to attend graduate school. P — 211. 



FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 



415, 416. Research Design and Analysis in Psychology. (3. 3) Intensive study of th| 
design of experiments and the analysis of research data in psychology. These course, 
cover conventional methods through complex analysis of variance. Requires pre] 
vious or concurrent course work in basic statistics. Hills, Wood, Solan.' 

427. Theories of Learning. (2) A critical examination of theories of learning and th< 
evidence on which they are based. Dufor 

428. Human Learning and Cognition. (2) Basic theoretical positions concerning thi 
processes of human learning and cognition, including concept development ant | 
utilization, rule learning, memory, shift behavior, and organizational structure. \ 

Richmai 
437. Motivation and Emotion. (2) Critical survey of major theoretical approaches tt' 
motivation and emotion. Bed 

442. Seminar in Developmental Psychology. (2) A critical examination of the majo 
findings, principles, and theories of development, with attention to both human ant 
lower-animal research. Staf 

452. Seminar in Social Psychology. (2) Content and methodology of social psycholo 
gy examined through a critical and comparative analysis of contemporary theory an<§ 
literature debates. Solan< 

457. Research Methods in Personality. (2) Study of experimental, correlational, antjJ 
other research strategies in the area of personality, with special emphasis on thil 
recent research literature. William; 

461. Theory and Practice of Psychological Testing. (3) Comparative analysis ana 
examination of standard tests used for psychological assessment, with attention 1 i 
techniques of administration and test theory. Staf' 

465. Seminar in Behavior Modification. (3) Analysis of the principles of operan 
conditioning and their application to the modification of behavior in laboratory 
clinical, and school situations. Spring. Staf 

467. Neuropsychology and Learning Disabilities. (3) Language, perceptual/motori 



. 



85 

memory, attentional, and emotional deficits arising from neurological factors are 
tudied in the context of brain functioning and information processing and applied 

p learning disabilities in children, in both theoretical and practical terms. P 

permission of instructor. Same course as Neuropsychology 401. Summer only. Wood 

\82. Readings and Research in Psychology. (1, 2, or 3) This listing allows the 
;raduate student, working under the supervision of a faculty member, to pursue and 
eceive credit for (1) a special reading project in an area not covered by regular 
purses or (2) a special research project not related to the master's thesis. Supervising 
acuity member and hours credit for which enrolled determined by graduate com- 
mittee prior to registration. Same course as Neuropsychology 482. Fall and spring. 

Staff 
89. Contemporary Problems in Psychological Theory. (2) Intensive study of 
urrent theoretical problems in a selected area of psychologv. Areas from which the 
ontent may be drawn in any given year include motivation and emotion, sensation 
hd perception, cognitive processes, biological psychology, animal behavior, and 
sycholinguistics. Not offered in 1982-83. Staff 

,91, 492. Thesis Research. (1-3, 1-3). Staff 



Religion 

Reynolda Campus 

Carlton T. Mitchell, Chairman 

Professors John William Angell, George McLeod Bryan, Robert Allen Dyer, 

Emmett W. Hamrick, Carlton T. Mitchell, Charles H. Talbert 

, Associate Professors John E. Collins, Fred L. Horton Jr., Ralph C. Wood Jr. 

Visiting Lecturer Thomas E. Dougherty 

Adjunct Professor Jerome R. Dollard 

The M.A. degree offered in the Department of Religion serves as either a terminal 
egree or as preparation for further graduate study in religion, 
j Graduate courses and opportunities for thesis research are offered in Old Testa- 
lent, New Testament, theology, the history of Christianity, Christian ethics, religion 
nd literature, world religions, religious education, and pastoral counseling. 

Not every course listed below is given every year, but at least two courses numbered 
30 or above are offered each semester of the regular academic year. Efforts are 
lade to include during any semester a course for which there is substantial demand, 
j In addition to the general requirements for admission to the Graduate School, the 
epartment of Religion requires a demonstration of proficiency by courses com- 
ieted or by examination in at least four of the following areas: Old Testament, New 
estament, the history of Christianity, world religions, theology. Christian ethics, 
story of philosophy, and Biblical languages (Greek and/or Hebrew, as appropri- 
e). Any student who lacks the necessary proficiency must take remedial courses 
ithout graduate credit. The department recommends that the modern foreign 
nguage requirement be met in French or German. The examination used for this 
urpose is the Graduate School Foreign Language Test. 



86 



M.A. in Pastoral Counseling 

The Department of Religion offers a clinically oriented program leading to the 
M.A. degree in religion with concentration in pastoral counseling. The clinical 1 
facilities and the resources of the School of Pastoral Care at the Medical Center are! 
used in connection with this program. Students can pursue certification as a Chaplairij 
Supervisor with the Association of Clinical Pastoral Education or as a Pastoral; 
Counselor with the American Association of Pastoral Counselors. A professional 
degree (M.Div. or M.R.E.) and a basic unit of clinical pastoral education are accept! 
able as an equivalency substitute for the modern language requirement. Ordinarily, 2 
student is in residence for one and one-half to two years in order to complete the' 
requirements for this program. 

The general M.A. program began in 1967. Study in pastoral counseling was addec 
in 1972. Departmental graduate committee: Angell, Horton (director of graduate 
studies), Mitchell. 



FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATE STUDENTS 

111, 112. Elementary Hebrew. (3, 3) A course for beginners in the classical Hebrev 
of the Bible, with emphasis on the basic principles of Hebrew grammar and th«, 
reading of Biblical texts. (Both semesters must be completed.) 

153. Intermediate Hebrew. (3) Intensive work in Hebrew grammar and syntax basec 1 
upon the reading of selected texts. Readings emphasize post-Biblical Hebrew. P- 
111, 1 12 or equivalent. 

211,212. Hebrew Literature. (3, 3) The reading and discussion of significant Biblica" 
texts. P— 153. 

301. Introduction to Semitic Linguistics. (3) In each of the four weeks the historl 
and structure of one of the languages from the Hamito-Semitic family of languages i 
studied. 

312. Poetic Literature of the Old Testament. (3) A study of Hebrew poetry, its types} 
its literary and rhetorical characteristics, and its significance in the faith of ancien 
Israel. 

315, 316. Field Research in Biblical Archeology. (3, 3) A study of the religion an( ( 
culture of the ancient Near East through the excavation and interpretation of aii 
ancient site. 

317. The Ancient Near East. (3) A comparative study of ancient Near Easterji 
cultures and religions. 

321. The Quest for the Historical Jesus. (3) An investigation of the possibility an<[i 
relevance of historical knowledge about Jesus through a consideration of the semimj 
Lives of Jesus since the eighteenth century. 

322. The General Epistles. (3) An exegetical study of two or more of the Genenj 
Epistles with emphasis on the setting of the epistles in the life of the early churchi 



87 

326. Early Christian Theologians: Paul. (3) An introduction to the Pauline inter- 
pretation of Christianity and its place in the life of the early church. 

$27. Early Christian Theologians: The Fourth Evangelist. (3) An examination of 
jhe Johannine interpretation of Jesus and Christian faith. 

?28. The New Testament and Ethics. (3) A study of selected ethical issues in the New 
Testament within the context of Mediterranean culture. 

132. Religion and the Social Crisis. (3) An interdisciplinary approach to the study of 
ociety today, with particular attention to views of human nature and social institu- 
tions as reflected in religion, the social sciences, and related disciplines. 

134. Christian Ethics and Contemporary Culture. (3) A study of the encounter 
oetween the Christian ethic and the value systems implicit in certain social areas such 
Is economics, politics, race, and sex; bio-medical decisions: and feminist theology. 
146. Theological Foundations of Religious Education. (3) A study of theological 
methodology, theories of learning, and philosophies of education in terms of their 
triplications for religious education. 

50. Psychology of Religion. (3) An examination of the psychological elements in 
V 1 origin, development, and expression of religious experience. 

54. Religious Development of the Individual. (3) A study of growth and develop- 
ment through childhood and adolescence to adulthood, with emphasis on the role of 
he home and the church in religious education. 

55. Theology of Pastoral Care and Counseling. (3) A study of the relationship 
etween theology and the purpose, theories, and methods of pastoral care and 
ounseling. 

60. Hinduism. (3) A study of the fundamental features of the Hindu tradition. 

'61. Buddhism. (3) A study of the Buddhist tradition, its fundamental features, and 
's impact on the culture of Asia. 

63. Hellenistic Religions. (3) Consideration of available source materials, ques- 
jons of method, and bibliography related to such Hellenistic religions as the Myster- 
^s, Hellenistic Judaism, and Gnosticism. 

64. Islam. (3) A study of the fundamental concepts of Islamic thought and the 
Sstorical context of its development. Both the ancient and contemporary impact of 
fie teachings of Islam are considered. 

65. History of Religions in America. (3) A study of American religions from 
'.olonial times until the present. 

73. The History of Christian Thought. (3) A study of the history of Christian 
taught, beginning with its Hebraic and Greek backgrounds and tracing its rise and 
evelopment to modern times. 

74. Contemporary Christian Thought. (3) An examination of the major issues and 
ersonalities in modern theology. 

76. The Origins of Existentialism. (3) A study of the principal nineteenth century 



88 



figures who form the background for twentieth century Existentialism: Goethe 
Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Dostoevsky, and Tolstoy. 



FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 



401, 402. Directed Reading. (3, 3) Staf 

416. Old Testament Theology. (3) Major motifs of revelation in the Old Testament' 
analysis of recent attempts to write an Old Testament theology. Hortot 1 

418, 419. Old Testament Exegesis. (3, 3) Detailed analysis and exegesis of selectee 
portions of the Hebrew Bible. P — Biblical Hebrew. Hamrici 

421. New Testament Theology. (3) A delineation of an approach to New Testamen 
theology as a whole, a consideration of the hermeneutical problem, and an examina. 
tion of two or three themes in New Testament theology. Talber. 

423, 424. New Testament Exegesis. (3, 3) Examination of selected portions of tfoi 
Greek New Testament, with attention to the tools necessary for exegesis. P — Koim 
Greek. Talben 

438. Seminar in Historical Types of Christian Ethics. (3) A seminar in the sourc 

materials of the main movements of Christian ethics from the time of the earl 

church to Existentialism, especially as they pertain to the major problems of th 1 

moral life. Brya ! 

1 
448. Seminar in Religious Education. (3) An advanced study of problems in the fief. 

of religious education, with particular attention to research principles and problems! 

Mitchei 

451. Theory and Practice of Pastoral Counseling. (3) A study of counseling methoc 
ologies, psychotherapeutic techniques, personal development, and human behavio' 
in terms of the implications for pastoral counseling. Doughert! 

455, 456. Clinical Pastoral Education. (3, 3) Clinical experience in pastoral carij 
including work in crisis situations, seminars, interdisciplinary clinical group session 
formal pastoral counseling, urban ministry assignments, and participation in grou, 
therapy. (Both semesters must be completed.) Stai. 

461. Seminar in Eastern Religion. (3) Directed study in selected areas of the religiot 
traditions of the East. Collir; 

466. Seminar in Christian History. (3) Directed study of selected areas in the histoi 1 
of Christianity, including Baptist history. Hinso' 

475. Seminar in the History of Christian Thought. (3) An intensive study of 
selected period or movement in Christian theological history, with special referenc 
to seminal persons and writings. Angc 

480. Seminar in Theology and Literature. (3) An intensive study of a single theoli 
gian in relation to a literary figure with a similar religious outlook, the aim being 
investigate how literature and theology mutually invigorate and call each other ini 






89 



question. Representative pairings: Niebuhr/Auden, Barth/O'Connor, Tillich/Up- 
like, Newman/Eliot, Kierkegaard/Percy. Wood 

191, 492. Thesis Research. (3, 3) Staff 



Speech Communication and Theatre Arts 

Reynolda Campus 
Donald H.Wolfe, Chairman 
j Professors Julian C. Burroughs Jr., Franklin R. Shirley, Harold C. Tedford 
Associate Professors Michael D. Hazen, Donald H. Wolfe 

I The Department of Speech Communication and Theatre Arts offers graduate 
kudy leading to the M.A. degree. The minimum requirement is thirty "semester 
.ours of work, six of which are allotted for the thesis. 

j Graduate study in speech communication and theatre arts is focused on the human 
:eing as communicator in a multitude of settings, such as the stage, public affairs, 
creen, business, television, radio, and daily interaction. The scholarly study of such 
embolic activities involves an integration of theory, research, and skills. Two general 
rograms of study are offered: (1) communication/rhetoric, with concentrations in 
ubhc address, organizational communication, mass communication, and interper- 
Jnal communication; and (2) theatre arts. Course work should include a minimum 
f sixteen hours in the major program, six hours of electives, and six hours of thesis 
|ork. 

I All students must demonstrate competence in a research skill relevant to their 
tesis and/or professional goals. Competency should be demonstrated in statistical 
jethodology, critical methodology, or an appropriate course or experience such as a 
jreign language or computer programming designed to meet the student's objec- 
yes and approved by the departmental graduate faculty. Graduate courses taken to 
ilfill the research skill requirement may not count toward the required thirty hours 
\r the M.A. 

Students who enroll for the master's degree are expected to have a strong under- 
-aduate background in the discipline or in related areas. Teaching experience may 
: accepted in partial fulfillment of the background requirement. The student who 
is deficiencies in undergraduate training may be asked to complete undergraduate 
quirements at the University while studying for the degree. 
All students who desire recommendation for the G Teaching Certificate from the 
orth Carolina Department of Education must take six semester hours of course 
prk in the Department of Education (one 300-level course and one 400-level 
jurse). Students should consult the Department of Education concerning these 
.quirements before beginning course work. 

'Although it is possible to obtain the M.A. degree in one calendar year, most 
idents find it advantageous to take two academic years to complete the program. 
The program began in 1969. Departmental graduate committee: Hazen (chair- 
ui), Burroughs, Shirley, Tedford, Wolfe. 




Students in the Department of Speech Communication and Theatre Arts get 

production experience . 



91 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATE STUDENTS 



U7. Theatrical Lighting Design. (3) The intensive study of the tools and aesthetics 
>f the designer's craft, with practical experience in designing for proscenium, thrust, 
ind arena staging. 

U8. Theatrical Special Effects. (3) A survey of the various special scenographic and 
ighting effects used in modern theatre. Special emphasis on effects used in produc- 
ions done during the semester. P — 223, 283H. 

119. Costume: History and Design. (3) A study of the evolution of costume through 
he ages and the design of historic costume for the stage. P — 121. 

20. Theatrical Scene Design. (3) A study of theories and styles of stage design and 
heir application to the complete play. P— 121, 235, or permission of instructor. 

21. Play Direction. (3) An introduction to the theory and practice of play directing. 
A grade is not granted until the student has completed 322.) P — 121, 226, or 
ermission of instructor. 

22. Play Production Laboratory. (1) A laboratory in the organization, techniques, 
nd problems encountered in a dramatic production. The production of a play for 
ublic performance is required. P — 321. 

23. Period and Style in Acting. (3) A study in social customs, movement, dances, 
nd theatrical styles relating to the performance of drama in historical settings as well 
i in period plays. The course includes performances in class. P — 226. 

24. Advanced Mime. (3) This course enlarges upon skills and techniques acquired 
1 22 1 (Mime), with the addition of other mime forms. The course includes exercises, 
:hearsals, and performances. P — 221. 

25. Advanced Acting. (3) A concentrated study of the actor's art through theory 
id practice. P — 226 or permission of instructor. 

26. Performance Techniques. (3) A course in advanced acting techniques, focusing 
i acting styles appropriate to various modes of theatrical production. Specialized 
chniques such as dance, singing, and stage combat may also be included. P— 226. 

17. Theatre History I. (3) A survey of the development of the theatre from its 
•igins to 1870. Includes lectures, readings, and reports. 

!8. Theatre History II. (3) A survey of the development of the modern theatre from 
S70 to the present. Includes lectures, readings, and reports. 

!9. Advanced Theatre Speech. (3) Specific study in the theory and personal 
:velopment of vocal melody, rhythm, color, and harmony, according to the form, 
pie, and mood of a theatrical production. P— 227 or permission of instructor. 

12. Seminar in Radio/Television. (3) Extensive readings in and discussions of 
ndamental theory and current issues in radio and television. P — 241. 

14. Advanced Radio Production. (2) Study of advanced radio forms: documentary 
id drama. P— 242. 



92 



345. Advanced TV Production. (2) Individual production of complex forms < 
television such as documentary and drama. P — 243. 

346. Film Criticism. (3) A study of film aesthetics through an analvsis of the work< 
selected film makers and film critics. P — 245. 

348. Advanced Film Production. (2) Individual production of complex films such, 
drama, animation, and documentary. P — 246. 

353. British Public Address. (3) An historical and critical survey of leading Britis, 
speakers and their speeches from the sixteenth centurv to the present. 

354. American Public Address. (3) The history and criticism of American publ 
address from Colonial times to the present. 

355. Directing the Forensic Program. (3) A pragmatic study of the methods • 
directing high school and college forensics. Laboratory work in the High Scho 
Debate Workshop. Summer only. 

356. The Rhetoric of Race Relations. (3) A study of race relations in America ! 
reflected in the rhetoric of selected black and white speakers. Students applv tl 
historical/critical method in exploring the effects of discourse on attempts at inte : 
racial communication. 

357. The Rhetoric of the Woman's Movement. (3) A study of selected wom< 
activitists and the impact of their speeches and arguments from the 1800s to tl 
present. Emphasis on the new feminist movement. 

371. Research in Communication. (3) An introduction to design and statistk 
procedures for research in communication. 

372. Survey of Organizational Communication. (3) An introduction to the role I 
communication in organizations, with emphasis on field applications. 

374. Mass Communication Theory. (3) Theoretical approaches to the role of coi i 
munication in reaching mass audiences and its relationship to other levels of coil 
munication. 

375. Communication and Conflict. (3) A study of communication in situations , | 
conflict on the interpersonal and societal levels. P — 153 or permission of instructol 
Not offered in 1982-83. 

376. Small Group Communication Theory. (3) Advanced study of the principles 
small group interaction and discussion leadership. P — 155 or permission of instn 
tor. 

378. Semantics and Language Behavior. (3) A studv of the syntactic aspects 
communicative messages. Xot offered in 1982—83. 



FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 



421. Modern Theatre Production. (3) A study of the development of mod* 



93 

heatrical production. The relationship of Realism, Naturalism, Expressionism, and 
>ther contemporary styles to production techniques. Lecture, readings, and projects. 

Wolfe 
t23. Advanced Directing. (3) A study of modern and period styles and techniques of 
lirecting. Application of styles to selected plays and various periods, with emphasis 
in problems in staging for modern audiences. Staff 

26. Evolution of Dramatic Theory: Seminar. (3) A study of selected theories which 
lave influenced theatre practice from the Greeks to the present. Tedford 

28. The Play. (3) Dramatic literature for the director, actor, and playwright. An 
itensive reading program in the plays which constitute the repertory of the modern 
rieatre, with attention to the problems presented to the theatre artist. Reading, 
iscussion, and reports. Tedford 

51. Classical Rhetorical and Communication Theory. (3) A study of the develop- 
jtent and consequent influence of the Greek and Roman rhetorical tradition, with 
mphasis on the contributions to the theory and criticism of rhetoric by Plato, 
.ristotle, Cicero, Quintilian, Campbell, and Whatley. Shirley 

52. Contemporary Rhetorical and Communication Theory. (3) An introduction to 
peory building in human communication and rhetoric, with a survey and evaluation 
f major contemporary groupings of theorists. Major approaches studied are those 
hich emphasize the symbol (George Herbert Mead and Kenneth Burke), human 
ilations (Martin Buber), the media (Marshall McLuhan), and systems (Norbert 
/iener). Hazen 

53. Seminar in Persuasion. (3) A critical examination of the logical, psychological, 
>ciological, and cultural dimensions of discourse. Readings in theories of persuasion 
;om the related fields of logic, politics, and psychology. Not offered in 1982-83. 

Hazen 

l 

>4. Rhetorical Criticism. (3) The study of critical approaches to the role of rhetoric 
contemporary society, with emphasis on methodology. Go 

)3. Proseminar in Communication. (3) A survey of the principles involved in 
leech communication. An introduction to graduate studies. Shirley 

'4. Research and Theory of Organizational Communication. (3) Advanced study 
theoretical approaches to the role of communication in organizations and empir- 
il application of such theories. Hazen 

10. Special Seminar. (3) The intensive study of selected topics in communication, 
opics may be drawn from any theory or context area of communication, such as 
rsuasion, organizational communication, film, or theatre. Staff 

1, 482. Readings and Research in Speech Communication or Theatre. (3, 3) 

udents may receive credit for a special reading project in an area not covered by 
gular courses or for a special research project not related to the master's thesis. 

Staff 
1, 492. Thesis Research. (3, 3) Staff 



94 



Interdisciplinary Program in Comparative 
and Experimental Pathology 

(A joint program of the Departments of Pathology and Comparative Medicine 

Hawthorne Campus 

This course of study and research leading to the M.S. or Ph.D. degree is designe 
for students who wish to prepare for a career of research or research/teaching i 
pathobiology, the study of the fundamental mechanisms of disease processes. B 
means of course work and seminars, the student is given a firm background in th 
basic medical sciences, including pathology. Advanced course work is designed to f 
the interests of the individual student, and disciplinary strength may be developed i 
biochemical, metabolic, or morphologic aspects of disease. Special emphasis is place 
on comparative pathology and on experimental design, procedure, and interpret 
tion of results to determine mechanisms involved in disease processes. 

Research opportunities are available in the areas of cardiovascular disease, natv 
rally occurring diseases of laboratory animals, arterial metabolism, hypertensior 
diabetes mellitus, reproduction and behavior, and others. The extensive facilities o 
the Departments of Comparative Medicine and Pathology are available. 

The program is open to qualified applicants with the B.S. or B.A. degree and, 
strong background in the physical and biological sciences. The program is also ope 
to applicants holding the M.D. or D.V.M. degree who wish the advanced degree t 
prepare them for careers in research. For the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees the gradual 
Program in Comparative and Experimental Pathology requires either a readinji 
knowledge of French or German or competence in a special skill such as statistic 
medical electronics, computer programming, or electrocardiography. The Ph. I 
program began in 1969, the M.S. in 1970. 

301. Introduction to Animal Experimentation. See Comparative Medicine. 
304. Microanatomy I — Cells and Tissues. See Anatomy. 
391. Biochemistry of Medicine. See Biochemistry. 

401, 402. Diseases of Laboratory Animals. See Comparative Medicine. 

402. Fundamentals of Pathology. See Pathology. 

404. Animal Models in Biomedical Research. See Comparative Medicine. 

405. Basic Primatology. See Comparative Medicine. 

406. Medical Primatology. See Comparative Medicine. 

408. Primate Ethology. See Comparative Medicine. 

409, 410. Advanced Topics in Comparative Medicine. See Comparative Medicin 

410. Pathologic Biochemistry. See Pathology. 

411, 412. Necropsy Conference. See Comparative Medicine. 
415, 416. Advanced Topics in Pathology. See Pathologv. 
417. Pathobiology of Atherosclerosis. See Pathologv. 




rofessor Keith O'Steen and graduate students Thane Duncan and Clara Miller preparing to 
inject animals with hormones 




column chromatography being run by graduate students Susan Olson and Donald Laird and 
Assistant Professor Ibrahim Ades 



96 



418. Diagnostic Clinical Microbiology. See Pathology. 

427, 428. Comparative and Experimental Pathology Seminar. See Pathology. 

429, 430. Research. See Pathology. 

Interdisciplinary Courses 

Hawthorne Campus 

393. Introduction to Medicine. (22) An interdisciplinary presentation of the kno\ 
ledge and concepts contributing to an understanding of disease states in man and tf 
use of drugs and other means of restoring to normal abnormalities of structure an 
function. The course is designed to prepare the student for the clinical experience t 
emphasizing the correlation and application of material from the pre-clinical sc 
ences. After an initial introduction to the general principles of patholqgi 
pathophysiology, pharmacology, and clinical microbiology, the material is organize 
on the basis of the major systems of the body and presented with emphasis ca 
correlation of the pathophysiologic processes, the immunologic and genetic bases < 
disease, the gross and histopathologic changes, and the pharmacologic and the 
apeutic properties of drugs. The subject matter includes a consideration of physic ( 
chemical, and biological agents of disease, abnormal immune mechanisms, dysoi 
togenesis, neoplasia, endocrinopathies, metabolic and nutritional imbalances; dii 
orders of the nervous, hematopoietic circulatory, renal, respiratory, gastrointestim 
reproductive, musculoskeletal, special senses, and psychophysiological and b 
havioral disturbances. Clinical presentations with patients provide the backgrour 
for the elements of medical history-taking, performing physical and mental stati 
examinations, and interpretations of the significance of clinical laboratory test rl 
suits. Lectures, conferences, laboratories, and clinical presentations by the staffs i 
the departments of physiology and pharmacology, biochemistry, pathology - , micr 
biology and immunology, medicine, psychiatry, and pediatrics. Separate gradua 
credit for Abnormal Physiology (4) and Medical Pharmacology (8) may be obtained 1 
attendance at lectures, laboratories, and other teaching sessions selected by the 
departments. P — 392 and permission of instructor. 

415. Sensory Neurobiology. (3) Audition, olfaction, somatic senses, taste, and visio; i 
anatomy, physiology, and behavior involved in the sensory neurobiology of the 
systems, including central nervous system plasticity. Laboratory experience includ 
electrophysiological recording from receptors and sensory nerves. P — Anatomy 4 
or equivalent course and permission of instructors. Offered in even-numbered year: I 

Deadwvler, Henkel, Miller, O'Stet 



Research in Clinical Science Departments 

Hawthorne Campus 

Directed research in any of the following departments carries the numbers 4S, 
492: family and community medicine, medical social sciences, medicine, neurolot 
psychiatry, radiology, and surgery. 



97 



Degrees Conferred 



December 19, 1980 

Doctor of Philosophy 

)eborah L. Bryant Collinsville, Virginia 

B.A., University of Virginia 

Dissertation: Hematopoietic Regulatory Factors in Normal 
and Avian Myeloblastosis Virus-Induced 
Leukemic Chickens 
Adviser: William H. Dodge, Microbiology and 
Immunology 
I 

oseph William Camp Jr Palatine, Illinois 

B.S., M.S., Illinois State University 

Dissertation: Studies on the Population Biology of 

Diploslomulum Scheuringi in Mosquitofish, Gambusia 
Affinis 
Adviser: Gerald W. Esch, Biology 

Shamroen Chetty Bangkok, Thailand 

B.S., Mahidol University 

Dissertation: Purification and Characterization of the 

Pneumococcal Purpura-Producing Principal (PPP) 
Adviser: Arnold S. Kreger, Microbiology and Immunology 

Master of Arts 

laria de los Angeles Castro H San Jose, Costa Rica 

B.A., University of Costa Rica 

Thesis: The Sacredness of the Body and Human Existence 

in Walt Whitman's "Children of Adam" 
Adviser: Robert N. Shorter, English 

)hn Henry Dery Fenton, Michigan 

B.S., Adrian College 

Thesis: A Comparison of Maximum Symptom-Limited 

Heart Rate, Oxygen Uptake and Blood Pressure 

During Tethered Swimming and Arm Crank 

Ergometry 
Adviser: William Thomas Boone, Physical Education 



98 



Kevin Barry Doherty Middletown, New Jers 

B.S., Montclair State College 

Thesis: The Use of CO a Rebreathing for Determining 
Hemodynamic Changes in Cardiac Patients at 
25%, 50% and 75% of Their Prescribed Exercise 
Heart Rate Range 

Adviser: William Thomas Boone, Physical Education 

Nanette Lucas Henry Shawnee, Oklahoiji 

B.A., Wake Forest University 

Thesis: A Thoracic and Upper Extremity Dissection of a 

Female Homo Sapiens 
Adviser: William Thomas Boone, Physical Education 

Kenneth Stanley Jago Charleston, South Carolin 

B.S., Hillsdale College 

Thesis: A Comparison of Predicted and Achieved Oxygen 

Uptakes Among Cardiac Patients 
Adviser: Paul M. Ribisl, Physical Education 

Karl V. Kropp Columbus, Oria 

B.S., Wake Forest University 

Thesis: Supercompact Spaces and Their Graph 

Representations 
Adviser: W. Graham May, Mathematics 

Kathy Marie Learner Charlotte, North Carolh 

B.A., Meredith College 

Thesis: The Effect of Modifying the Cognitive Tempo of 

Reading Disabled Children on Reading 

Comprehension and Self-Concept 
Adviser: Charles L. Richman, Psychology 

Brenda Lynn Linthicum Randleman, North Carolia 

B.A., University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

Thesis: Pettit Site Masonry: A Study of I ntrasite Social 
Integration 

Adviser: J. Ned Woodall, Anthropology- 
Chris Ciminello Meyer Columbus, Ob 

B.S., Ohio State University 

Thesis: Fatigue Tolerance in Female Distance Runners 

Adviser: Paul M. Ribisl, Physical Education 



99 

Charles Isidore Nero New Orleans, Louisiana 

B.A., Xavier University 

Thesis: A Transactional Approach to Analyzing the Conflict 

Between the Communist Worker's Party and the 

Ku Klux Klan 
Adviser: Michael D. Hazen, Speech Communication and 

Theatre Arts 

.auris Joan Parker High Point, North Carolina 

B.A., Wake Forest University 

Thesis: Expectancies and Perceived Effort as Mediators of 

Coaching Behavior and Players' Self Concept in 

Youth League Basketball 
Adviser: Walter J. Rejeski Jr., Physical Education 

Claire Hodnett Price Winston-Salem, North Carolina 

B.A., University of the South 

Thesis: Effects of Rate of Auditory Information Processing 

on Reading Ability and Memory Test 

Performance 
Adviser: Charles L. Richman, Psvchologv 

Lathy Ann Dlabal Rucker Winston-Salem, North Carolina 

B.A., St. Mary's College 

Thesis: A Song of Violence: Psalm 137 in Historical-Critical 

Study and in Augustine 
Adviser: Fred L. Hortonjr., Religion 

leanor Marsh Shepard Chattanooga, Tennessee 

B.A., University of Tennessee 

Thesis: Conceptual Level Theory and Performance on 

Verbal and Non-Verbal Tasks 
Adviser: David W. Catron, Psychology 

eane Mood Smith College Park, Maryland 

B.A., Jacksonville University 

Thesis: Self-Esteem and Locus of Control as Related to 

Achievement Motivation and Intellectual 

Functioning 
Adviser: Charles L. Richman, Psychology 

obert Allen Wampler Bristol, Tennessee 

B.A., King College 

Thesis: In Search of a Liberal Concensus: The League for 

Independent Political Action 1928-1933 
Adviser: Richard L. Zuber, History 



[00 



John Wayne Weaver Charlotte, North Carols 

B.A., Wake Forest University 

Thesis: Isolation and Hemoglobin Content of Immature 

Red Blood Cells in Anemia-Stressed Rainbow 

Trout (Salmo gairdneri) 
Adviser: Hugo C. Lane, Biology 

Master of Arts in Education 

Vicki Crews Brill Winston-Salem, North Caroling 

B.A., Wake Forest University 

Thesis: Bilingual Education: One Answer to the 

Multi-Ethnic Challenge 
Adviser: Joseph O. Milner, Education 

Joseph Henry Bunch Edenton, North Carolin i 

B.A., Wake Forest University 

Research Report: A Studv of the Effect of the Svstematic 
Training for Effective Parenting Approach 
Self-Reported Levels of Anxiety. Impulsivitv 
Depression, and Emotional Stability 

Adviser: Leonard P. Roberge, Education 

Barbara Ann Grant Canupp Clemmons, North Caroliri! 

B.A., Wake Forest Universitv 

Research Report: A Study of Reported Religiositv and 

Counselor Attitudes and Behavior 
Adviser: Thomas M. Elmore, Education 

Eleanore Jeanine Chadwell Winston-Salem, North Carolir 

B.B.A., Wake Forest Universitv 

Research Report: A Studv of the Relationship Between 

Anxiety and the Counseling Orientations of 

Counselors-In-Training 
Adviser: Thomas M. Elmore, Education 

Anna Ruth Grady Greenville, Tennesse 

B.A., Wake Forest Universitv 

Research Report: A Comparison of Moral Develop- 
ment Between Children from Father-Present 
and Father-Absent Homes 

Adviser: Leonard P. Roberge, Education 



101 



/ickie Bowman Jones Danville, Virginia 

B.A., University of Richmond 

Thesis: Use of the Iowa Algebra Aptitude Test in 

Predicting Achievement in First-Year Algebra in 
the Danville Public schools 
Adviser: Herman J. Preseren, Education 

Master of Science 

erry Wayne Lawson Winston-Salem, North Carolina 

A.B., Elon College 

Thesis: The Lingual and Pharyngeal Distribution of the 

Glossopharyngeal Nerve in the Rat 
Adviser: InglisJ. Miller Jr., Anatomy 

May 18, 1981 

Doctor of Philosophy 

Roderick Edmiston Brown Jr Hendersonville, North Carolina 

B.A., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill 
Dissertation: Relationships Between the Mitochondrial 

Adenosine Triphosphatase and its Surrounding 

Amphiphilic Environment 
Adviser: Carol C. Cunningham, Biochemistry 

>avid Maxwell Lyerly Granite Quarry, North Carolina 

B.S., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill 
Dissertation: Evaluation of the Role(s) of Serratia Proteases 

in the Pathogenesis of Serratia Marcescens Keratitis 

and Pneumonia 
Adviser: Arnold S. Kreger, Microbiology and Immunology 

harles Augustine Napolitano Cranston, Rhode Island 

B.S., Brown University 

Dissertation: The Effects of a Lipid Diet on Myocardial 

Contractility and Fragmented Sarcoplasmic 

Reticulum in the New Zealand White Rabbit 
Adviser: Darwin W. Peterson, Physiology 



102 



Master of Arts 

Richard Douglas Boese Charleston, South Carola 

B.A., David Lipscomb College 

Thesis: Born in Controversy: The United States Custom 

House at Charleston, South Carolina, Its History 
and Preservation 
Adviser: J. Edwin Hendricks, History 

Stephen Reno Claggett Louisville, Kentuty 

B.A., Centre College of Kentucky 

Thesis: Archaic Stage Adaptations in the Piedmont: An 

Evaluation of Four Models Using Data From 

North-Central North Carolina 
Adviser: J. Ned Woodall, Anthropology 

James Kevin Dill Winston-Salem, North Carola 

B.S., East Carolina L'niversity 

Thesis: Differences in Selected Perceptual and Physiological 

Variables of Males and Females at Work 
Adviser: Walter J. Rejeski Jr., Physical Education 

Leslie Gayle French Wexford, Pennsylva a 

B.S., Lrsinus College 

Thesis: Body Awareness and Motor Development in 

Preschool Children 
Adviser: William L. Hottinger, Physical Education 

i 

Tony Lee Glover Jamestown, North Carola 

B.S., High Point College 

Thesis: The Effects of Three Months of Prescribed ■ 

Exercise on the Anaerobic Threshold in Patients 
with Coronary Heart Disease 
Adviser: Paul M. Ribisl, Physical Education 

Francis Wishart Mitchell Great Falls, Monti 

B.A., University of Utah 

Thesis: Rhetoric and Culture: A Rhetorical Criticism of 

China's Nineteenth Century Response to the West 
Adviser: Michael D. Hazen, Speech Communication and 

Theatre Arts 



103 



'eresa Irene Newsome Selma, North Carolina 

B.A., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill 

Thesis: An Investigation of the Roles of Motivation and 

Processing in Age-Related Memory Deficits 
Adviser: Robert H. Dufort, Psvchology 

lary Elizabeth Shelley Nichols, South Carolina 

B.A., University of South Carolina 

Thesis: Problem Solving as a Means for Inducing 

Organization in Children's Recall 
Adviser: Cecilia H. Solano, Psychology 

> illiam W. Sloan Jr Franklin, North Carolina 

A.B., Davidson College 

Thesis: Verbal Communication of Lonely Versus 

NonLonely Students in Roommate Versus 

Stranger Dyads 
Adviser: Cecilia H. Solano, Psychology 

isa Anne Wolford Atlanta, Georgia 

A.B., Lenoir Rhyne College 

Thesis: Historical Data as a Basis for Characterization: An 
Actress's Approach to the Character of Emily 
Dickinson in William Luce's The Belle of Amherst 

Adviser: Harold C. Tedford, Speech Communication and 
Theatre Arts 

)hn S. Yuille Old Bridge, New Jersey 

B.A., Butler University 
Thesis: Dance Training for the Actor 
Adviser: Donald H. Wolfe, Speech Communication and 
Theatre Arts 

Master of Arts in Education 

Ian Spencer Cameron Winston-Salem, North Carolina 

B.A., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill 
Research Report: Perceptions of a College Environment 

by its Graduating Seniors 
Adviser: Leonard P. Roberge, Education 




Graduate student at work in the anthropology laboratory. 



105 



lorothy Suzanne Camp Ft. Lauderdale, Florida 

B.A., Salem College 

Research Report: A Comparison of Amounts of Alcohol 

Consumption of College Women as They Relate 
to Academic Class and Grade Point Average 
Adviser: Leonard P. Roberge, Education 

ynthia Ann Gibson Greensboro, North Carolina 

B.A., Duke University 

Research Report:The Relationship Between Personality 

Type and Preference for Counseling Approach 
Adviser: Thomas M. Elmore, Education 

ranees Moody Guthrie Asheboro, North Carolina 

B.A., East Carolina University 

Thesis: A Compare/Contrast Strategy of Mediated Word 

Identification for Educable Mentally 

Handicapped Children 
Adviser: Patricia M. Cunningham, Education 

arol Eidel Heames Winston-Salem, North Carolina 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh 

Research Report: A Comparison of Values of Three 

Groups of Female Graduate Students 
Adviser: Leonard P. Roberge, Education 

ynn Ellen Jones Moore Mocksville, North Carolina 

B.A., Catawba College 

Thesis: A Comparison of Children's Ability to Define and 

to Apply Phonics Terms 
Adviser: John H. Litcher, Education 

oger Roosevelt Pearman Jr Greensboro, North Carolina 

B.A., Wake Forest University 

Research Report: The Relationship of Selected Variables 

to Personal— Social Experiences of College Seniors 
While Controlling for Satisfaction with Academic 
Environment 

Adviser: Thomas M. Elmore, Education 

lirley Austin Tuttle Winston-Salem, North Carolina 

B.A., Winston-Salem State University 
Research Report: The Relationship Between 

Self-Actualization and Vocational Maturity in 

High School Seniors 
Adviser: Thomas M. Elmore, Education 



106 

Henriette M. Neal Asheboro, North Carolir 

B.S., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill 

Thesis: A Study of the Activation of Glycogen Svnthase and 

Glycogen Phosphorylase in Human 

Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes 
Adviser: Lawrence R. DeChatelet, Biochemistry 

David A. Bass, co-adviser 

Thomas James O'Hara III Westlake, Ohi< 

B.S., Wake Forest University 

Thesis: Spectral Studies of Some Sulfur-Oxygen Containing 
Compounds Using Oxygen- 18 Isotopic 
Substitution: Vibrational Assignments for SOF.,, 
CF 3 , SO s , OH and (CF 3 S0 2 ) 2 O 

Adviser: Ronald E. Noftle, Chemistry 

Oscar David Redwine Kenansville, North Carolir j 

B.S., Wake Forest University 

Thesis: Preparation, Characterization and Study of Spin 

Labeled Bleomycin-A 2 
Adviser: Phillip J. Hamrick Jr., Chemistry 

William P. Smales Winston-Salem, North Carolin 

B.S., University of Tennessee 

Thesis: Cyclic AMP-Dependent and Cyclic GMP-Dependent 

Protein Kinases in Renal Cortical Homogenates 
Adviser: David M. Biddulph, Anatomy 

August 4, 1981 

Doctor of Philosophy 

Eric Newell Olson Norwich, New Yoi 

B.A., Wake Forest University 

Dissertation: Biochemical Alterations in Skeletal Muscle 

Membranes 
Adviser: Peter B. Smith, Biochemistry 

Master of Arts 

Gary R. Brodowicz Sterling Heights, Michiga 

B.S. Ed., University of Michigan 

Thesis: The Influence of Toe Clips During Cycle 

Ergometry on Anaerobic Threshold of Trained 

Cyclists and Non-Cvclists 
Adviser: Paul M. Ribisl, Physical Education 



107 

ievin Patrick Cox Tyler, Texas 

B.A., East Texas State University 

Thesis: The Fire and the Hearth: Faulkner's Insistence on 

Moral Responsibility 
Adviser: Lee H. Potter, English 

Hernando Antonio del Portillo Bogota, Colombia 

B.S., University of LaSalle 

Thesis: Host-Induced Negative Phototaxis in the Association 

of the Water-Mite Unionicola Formosa with the 

Freshwater Mussel Anodonta Imbecilis 
Adviser: Ronald V. Dimock Jr., Biology 

Vlary McLean Hix Clermont, Florida 

B.A., Wake Forest University- 
Thesis: Weather Imagery in Jane Austen's Mansfield Park 

and Emma 
Adviser: Robert Lovett, English 

\nita Elizabeth Jones Baltimore, Maryland 

B.A., Western Maryland College 

Thesis: Captain Charles Ridgely, Builder of Hampton 

Mansion: Mariner, Colonial Agent, Ironmaster, 

and Politician 
Adviser: J. Edwin Hendricks, History 

William J. Kehr Matthews, North Carolina 

A.B., Davidson College 

Thesis: Reward Allocation as a Function of Reward Scarcity, 

Availability of Input Information, and Sex of 

Group 
Adviser: Cecilia Solano, Psychology 

Douglas Scott King Albany, California 

A.B., University of California, Berkeley 

Thesis: The Effect of Toeclip Use on Maximal Oxvgen 

Uptake During Bicycle Ergometry in Competitive 

Cyclists and Trained Non-Cyclists 
Adviser: Paul M. Ribisl, Physical Education 



108 

Richard James Kuczynski Cohoes, New Yorl 

B.A., University of Dayton 

Thesis: An Empirical Study of the Effects of Physical 

Appearance and a Self-Disclosing Communication 

Strategy on Attraction and Communication 

Behavior 
Adviser: Michael D. Hazen, Speech Communication and 

Theatre Arts 

Barbee Claudette Myers East Bend, North Carolin; 

B.S., Wake Forest University- 
Thesis: A Lower Extremity Dissection of a Male Homo 

Sapiens 
Adviser: William T. Boone, Physical Education 

Carl Usry Patterson Jr Raleigh, North Carolinr 

B.S., Wake Forest University 

Thesis: A Comparison of Maximum Svmptom-Limited 

Cardiorespiratory and Hemodvnamic Variables 
During Tethered Swimming With and Without a 
Floatation Device 

Adviser: William T. Boone, Physical Education 

Sybil Strupe Rights Winston-Salem, North Carolina 

B.A., Agnes Scott College 

Thesis: Hardy's "Scripture Manner": Biblical Allusion mFar 

From The Madding Crowd, The Woodlanders, Tess Of 

The D'Urbervilles, and J ude The Obscure 
Adviser: John A. Carter, English 

Sandra M. Saunders Franklin, North Caroling 

B.A., Western Carolina University 

Thesis: Blake's Treatment of Women in Jerusalem 

Adviser: Edwin Wilson, English 

Nancy Webster Schultz Winston-Salem, North Carolina 

B.A., Wake Forest University 

Thesis: The Civil War Career of John Gibbon 

Adviser: Richard L. Zuber, History 

Peter William Wooldridge Lynchburg, Virgin! 

B.S., The College of William and Man in Virginia 
Thesis: Teacher's Choice of Punishment as a Function of a 

Student's Sex, Age, Race and IQ Level 
Adviser: Charles Richman, Psvchology 



109 



Master of Arts in Education 

Kathryn Parker Brown Winston-Salem, North Carolina 

B.S., Wake Forest University 

Research Report: Locus of Control in Learning 

Disabled Students 
Adviser: Thomas M. Elmore, Education 

Shirley Sue Crump Winston-Salem, North Carolina 

B.S., Guilford College 

Thesis: A Proposal for the Upgrading of Credentials for 

Graduates of the Nurse Anesthesia Program of 

the North Carolina Baptist Hospital and the 

Bowman Gray School of Medicine 
Adviser: J. Don Reeves, Education 

Karen S. Miller Winston-Salem, North Carolina 

B.A., North Carolina State University- 
Research Report: An Examination of the Relation- 
ship Between Self Concept and Academic 
Achievement of Fifth and Sixth Grade Boys and 
Girls 
Adviser: Leonard P. Roberge, Education 

Elizabeth Caroline Reiser Birmingham, Alabama 

A.B., Duke University 

Research Report: The Effects of Stress on 

Academic Performance as Mediated by 

Personality Factors 
Adviser: Thomas M. Elmore, Education 

Patricia Lovell Speas St. Petersburg, Florida 

B.A., Wake Forest University 

Research Report: Sex-Role Stereotyping and Its 

Influence on Children's Occupational 

Attitudes and Preferences 
Adviser: Leonard P. Roberge, Education 




Provost and Professor of English Edwin Graves Wilson 



Ill 
The Board of Trustees 



Terms Expiring December 31, 1982 

oseph Branch, Raleigh Robert A. Culler, High Point 

)ewey H. Bridger Jr., Bladenboro Manuel E. Cannup, Greensboro 

.ouise Broyhill, Lenoir Charles Cedric Davis, Farmville 

Z. Frank Colvard Jr., West Jefferson John D. Larkins, Trenton 
William W. Leathers III, Rockingham 



Terms Expiring December 31, 1983 

harles W. Cheek, Greensboro Pete Lovette, Wilkesboro 

rhomas H. Davis, Winston-Salem Claude A. McNeill Jr., Elkin 

1 C. Hope Jr., Charlotte Mary Lide Morris, Burlington 

ohn M. Lewis, Raleigh Dale Simmons, Mt. Airy 

Lonnie Williams, Wilmington 



Terms Expiring December 31, 1984 

Albert L. Butler Jr., Winston-Salem Katharine Mountcastle, New Canaan, 

Egbert L. Davis Jr., Winston-Salem Connecticut 

Vlark Holt, Fayetteville W. Boyd Owen, Waynesville 

Petro Kulynych, Wilkesboro Leon L. Rice, Winston-Salem 

fames W. Mason, Laurinburg Eugene Worrell, Charlottesville, Virginia 



Terms Expiring December 31, 1985 

Bert L. Bennett, Winston-Salem Jean H. Gaskin, Charlotte 

Robert P. Caldwell Sr., Gastonia Weston P. Hatfield, Winston-Salem 

R. Stuart Dickson, Charlotte Alton H. McEachern, Greensboro 

Floyd Fletcher, Durham J. Robert Philpott, Lexington 

J Smith Young, Lexington 



Officers 

(For one-year terms beginning January 1, 1982) 

C. C. Hope Jr., Charlotte, Chairman 

Charles W. Cheek, Greensboro, Vice-Chairman 

Elizabeth S. Drake, Winston-Salem, Secretary 

John G. Williard, Winston-Salem, Treasurer and Assistant Secretary 

Womble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice, Winston-Salem, General Counsel 

Leon H. Corbett Jr., Winston-Salem, Associate General Counsel 



The Board of Visitors 



Arnold Palmer, Latrobe, Pennsylvania 
Chairman, University Board of Visitors 

James Alfred Martin Jr., Laurinburg 
Chairman, College Board of Visitors 

Wake Forest College and Graduate School 

Terms Expiring December 31, 1982 

Samuel H. Adler, Rochester, New York Albert R. Hunt Jr., Washington. D.C 

Maya Angelou, Winston-Salem Graham A. Martin, Winston-Salem 

William L. Bondurant, Winston-Salem Martin Mayer, New York, New York 

Wallace Carroll, Winston-Salem Jasper D. Memory, Raleigh 

Ralph Ellison, New York, New York Bill Movers, New York, New York 

Harold T. P. Haves, New York, Eugene Owens, Charlotte 
New York 

Terms Expiring December 31, 1983 

George Anderson, Jacksonville, Florida Constance Gray, Winston-Salem 

A. R. Ammons, Ithaca, New York Charles U. Harris, Delaplane, Virgini; 

Bert Bennett, Winston-Salem Hubert Humphrev, Greensboro 

John Chandler, Williainstown, James Alfred Martin Jr., 
Massachusetts New York, New York 

Merrimon Cuninggim, Winston-Salem Earl Slick, Winston-Salem 

Ronald Deal, Hickory Zachary T. Smith, Winston-Salem 

Arthur E. Earlev. Cleveland, Ohio Feme Sticht, Winston-Salem 

Terms Expiring December 31, 1984 

David Brvant, S. Charleston, Jack Hatcher, Lebanon. New 

West Virginia Hampshire 

Aurelia Gray Eller, Winston-Salem Connie William King. Nashville. 
Frank Forsyth, Winston-Salem Tennessee 

Anne Reynolds Forsvth, Winston-Salem John F. McNair III, Winston-Salem 

Stanley Frank, Greensboro Wayne Oates, Louisville, Kentucky 

Edward Gould, Atlanta, Georgia Lorraine F. Rudolph, Winston-Salem 

Frank Willingham, Houston, Texas 

Terms Expiring December 31, 1985 

Herbert Brenner, Winston-Salem K. Wayne Smith, Washington, D. C 

F. Hudnall Christopher Jr., Leland T. Waggoner, Short Hills, 

Winston-Salem New Jersey 

E. Garland Herndon. Atlanta, Georgia Meade Willis. Winston-Salem 

Thomas W. Lambeth, Winston-Salem J. Tylee Wilson, Winston-Salem 

Robert Maloy, Washington, D. C. Juch Woodruff, Washington, D. C. 

Ex-Officio Members 

Jerry Attkisson. President. Alumni Council. Atlanta. Georgia 

James W. Mason. Chairman, Planning and Development Committee, 

Board of Trustees 



113 



The Administration 



Date following name indicates year of appointment. 
University 



ames R. Scales (1967) President 

B.A., Oklahoma Baptist; M.A., Ph.D., Oklahoma; Litt.D., 
Northern Michigan; LL.D., Alderson-Broaddus; LL.D., Duke; 
Litt.D., Belmont Abbey 

idwin Graves Wilson (1946, 1951) Provost 

B.A., Wake Forest; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard 

vfanson Meads (1947, 1963) Vice President for Health Affairs and 

B.A., California; M.D., Sc.D., Temple Director of the Medical Center 

ohn G. Williard (1958) Vice President and Treasurer 

B.S., North Carolina (Chapel Hill); C.P.A., North Carolina 

j. William Jovner Jr. (1969) Vice President for Development 

B.A., Wake Forest 

Russell H. Brantley Jr. (1953) Assistant to the President and 

B.A., Wake Forest Director of Communications 

^eon Corbett (1968) Associate General Counsel 

B.A., J.D., Wake Forest 

loss A. Griffith (1966) Director of Equal Opportunity 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.Ed., North Carolina (Greensboro) 

College 

Thomas E. Mullen (1957) Dean of the College 

B.A., Rollins; M.A., Ph.D., Emory 

Robert Allen Dyer (1956) Associate Dean 

B.A., Louisiana State; Th.D., Ph.D., Southern Baptist Seminary 

Toby A. Hale (1970) Assistant Dean and Director of Educational 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.Div., Duke; Ed.D., Indiana Planning and Placement 

\. Rick Heatlev (1970) Associate in Academic Administration 

B.A., Baylor; M.A., Ph.D., Texas and Associate Director of 

Educational Planning and Placement 

r'atricia Adams Johannsson (1969) Assistant to the Dean 

B.A., Winston-Salem State; M.A., Wake Forest of the College 

Graduate School 

4enrv Smith Stroupe (1937) Dean of the Graduate School 

B.S., M.A., Wake Forest; Ph.D. .Duke 

^rold O. Goodman (1958) Associate Dean for Biomedical 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Minnesota Graduate Studies 



114 



School of Law 



John D. Scarlett (1955, 1979) 

B.A., Catawba; J. D., Harvard 

Leon H. Corbett Jr. (1968) 
B.A., J.D., Wake Forest 

Robert F. Clodfelter (1981) 
LL.B., Duke 

Charles H. Taylor (1976) 
B.S..J.D.,Wake Forest 

Jean K. Hooks (1970) 



Laura L. Meyers (1959) 



Dean of the School of La 
Associate Dec 



Associate Dec 
for Academic Affai 

Director of Continuh 
Legal Educatk 

Director of Admission 
and Assistant to the Dec' 

Director of Placeme 



Babcock Graduate School of Management 



Edward L. Felton Jr. (1980) 

B.A.. Richmond; B.D., Southeastern Seminary; 
M.B.A., DBA., Harvard 

William L. Berry (1979) 

B.S., Virginia Polytechnic; 

MB. A., Western Kentucky; D.B.A., Harvard 

Michael L. Rice (1980) 

B.S., MB. A., Florida State; 

Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

James M. Clapper (1975) Director of MBA Executive Progra 

B.S., M.S., Rensselaer: Ph.D., Massachusetts 



Dean of the Babcock Gradua 
School of Manageme 

Associate Dec 
for Academic Affai 

Associate Dec t 
for Administrate 



Jean Hopson (1970) 

B.A., Murray State; M.S. in L.S., George Peabodv; 
M.B.A., Wake Forest 

Bruce R. Holliday (1981) 

B.A., Davidson; M.B.A., Wake Forest 



Assistant Dec 



Director of Admissioi 



Bowman Gray School of Medicine 



Richard Janewav (1966) 

B.A., Colgate; M.D., Pennsylvania 

Nat E. Smith (1976) 

B.A., Erskine; M.D., Georgia 

C. Nash Herndon (1942, 1966) 
B.A., Duke; M.D., Jefferson 

J. Kiffin Penrv (1979) 

B.S., M.D., Wake Forest 

Harold O. Goodman (1958) 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Minnesota 



Dean of the Bowman Gn 
School of Medich 

Associate Deo 



Senior Associate Dean for Research Developme, 



Associate Dean jor Research Developme, 
(Nenroscience 

Associate Dean for Biomedici 
Graduate Studi 



)lyde T. Hardyjr. (1941) Associate Dean for Patient Sendees 

B.A., Richmond 

Varren H. Kennedy (1971) Associate Dean for Administration 

B.B.A., Houston 

ohn D. Tolmie (1970) Associate Dean for Student Affairs 

B.A., Hobart; M.D., McGill 

Ornery C. Miller Jr. (1955) Associate Dean for Continuing Education 

B.A., North Carolina (Chapel Hill); M.D., Johns Hopkins 

bhn H. Felts (1955) Associate Dean for Admissions 

B.S., Wofford; M.D., South Carolina 

antes C. Leist (1974) Assistant Dean for Continuing Education 

B.S., Southeastern Missouri State; M.S., Ed.D., Indiana 

'. Dennis Hoban (1978) Director of the Office of 

B.A., Villanova; M.S., Ed.D., Indiana Educational Research and Services 

School of Business and Accountancy 

'nomas C. Taylor (1971) Dean of the School 

B.S., M.A., North Carolina (Chapel Hill); of Business and Accountancy 

Ph.D., Louisiana State; C.P.A., North Carolina 

Summer Session 

ercival Perry (1939, 1947) Dean of the Summer Session 

B.A.,Wake Forest; M.A.. Rutgers; Ph.D., Duke 

Student Services 

3avid Allen Hills (1960) Coordinator of Student Sendees 

B.A., Kansas; M.A., Ph.D., Iowa 

►lark H. Reece (1956) Dean of Men 

B.S., Wake Forest 

Lu M. Leake (1964) Dean of Women 

B.A., Louisiana State; M.R.E., Southern Baptist Seminary 

[dward R. Cunnings (1974) Director of Housing 

B.S.M., M.Ed., St. Lawrence 

Vlichael Ford (1981) Director of the College Union 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.Div., Gordon-Conwell 
Theological Seminary 

r .dgar D. Christman (1956, 1961) Chaplain 

B.A., J. D., Wake Forest; B.D., Southeastern Baptist Seminary; 
S.T.M., Union Seminary 

kian M.Austin (1975) Director of the Center for 

B.A., Monmouth; M.S.Ed., Ph.D., Southern Illinois Psychological Services 

/larianne Schubert (1977) Assistant Director of the Center for 

B.A., Dayton; M.A., Ph.D., Southern Illinois Psychological Services 



Mary Ann H. Taylor (1961, 1978) 
B.S., M.D., Wake Forest 



Director of University Strident Health Sen>ia 



Educational Planning and Placement 



Tobv A Hale (1970 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.Div., 
Duke; Ed.D., Indiana 

N. Rick Heatlev (1979) 

B.A., Bavlor; M.A., Ph.D.. Texas 



Assistant Dean and Directc, 

of Educational Planning an 

Placemet . 

Associate itt Academic Administrtatio 

and Associate Director i 

Educational Planning and Placemet 



Records and Institutional Research 

Ben M. Seelbinder (1959) Director of Records and Institutional Researc 

B.A., Mississippi Delta State; M.A.. Ph.D.. North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 



Margaret R. Perry (1947) 
B.S., South Carolina 



Regis tra 



Admissions and Financial Aid 

William G. Starling (1958) Director of Admissions and Financial At) 

B.B.A., Wake Forest 

Shirlev P. Hamrick (1957) Associate Director of Admission 

B.A., North Carolina (Chapel Hill); M.A. in Ed.. Wake Forest 



W. Douglas Bland (1975) 

B.A.. M.A. in Ed.. Wake Forest 

Lvne S. Gamble (1978) 
B.A., Millsaps 

Karen A. Jaenke (1980) 

B.A., Wake Forest 

Suzette Jordan (1981) 
B.A., Wake Forest 



Assistant Director of Admission 

Assistant Director of Admission 

Admissions and Einancic 
Aid Counselo 

Admissions and Einancic 
Aid Counselo 



Personnel 

James L. Ferrell (1975) Director of Personni 

B.A., North Carolina (Chapel Hill); M.S., Virginia Commonwealth 

Communications and Publications 



Russell H. Brantley Jr. (1953) 
B.A., Wake Forest 

Martha W. Lentz (1973) 



B.A., North Carolina (Chapel Hill); M.B.A.. Wake Forest 



Assistant to the President aru 
Director of Communication 

University Publications Edito 



G. William Joyner Jr. (1969) 

B.A.. Wake Forest 



Development and Alumni Activities 

Vice President for Developmet 



117 



ulius H. Corpening (1969) 

B.A., Wake Forest; B.D., Southern Baptist Seminary 

Robert D. Mills (1972) 
B.A., Wake Forest 



tobert T. Baker (1978) 

B.A., M.S., George Peabody 

tfinta Aycock McNally (1978) 
B.A., Wake Forest 

V. Craig Jackson (1978) 
B.A., Wake Forest 

ames Reid Morgan (1980) 
B.A.J.D., Wake Forest 



Director of Development 
and Estate Planning 

Director of Alumni Activities 

Director of Corporate Relations 
and the Law Fund 

Director of the College Fund 



Assistant to the 
Director of Alumni Activities 

Foundations Officer 



Financial Affairs 

ohn G. Williard (1958) Vice President and Treasurer 

B.S., North Carolina (Chapel Hill); C.P.A., North Carolina 

^arlos O. Holder (1969) Controller and Assistant Treasurer 

B.B.A., Wake Forest 

fi. Derald Hagen (1978) Assistant Controller 

B.S., Virginia Polytechnic 



Libraries 

4errill G. Berthrong (1964) 

B.A., Tufts; M.A., Fletcher; Ph.D., Pennsylvania 

tichard J. Murdoch (1966) 

B.A., Pennsylvania Military; M.S. in L.S., Villanova 

Lenneth A. Zick II (1975) 

B.A., Albion; J.D., Wayne State; M.L.S., Michigan 

/ivian L. Wilson (1960) 

B.A., Coker; B.S. in L.S., George Peabody 

ean B. Hopson (1970) 

B.S. in Ed., Murray State; M.S. in L.S., 
George Peabody; M.B.A., Wake Forest 

lichael D. Sprinkle (1972) 

B.A., M.S. in L.S., North Carolina 



Director of Libraries 

Assistant to the Director and 
Curator of Rare Books 

Director of Law Library Services 
Librarian of the School of Law 



Librarian of the Babcock Graduate 
School of Management 

Librarian of the Bowman Gray 
School of Medicine 



Athletics 

Eugene Hooks (1956) Director of Athletics 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.Ed., North Carolina; Ed.D., George Peabody 

>orothy Casey ( 1 949) Director of Women's Athletics 

B.S., Woman's College, North Carolina; M.A., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 



Nicholas B. Bragg (1970) 
B.A., Wake Forest 

Richard T. Clay (1956) 
B.B.A.. Wake Forest 



Other Administrative Offices 

Executive Director of Reynolda Hous 



Director of University Store 



Thomas M. Elmore (1962) Director of Counselor Educatio; 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., George Peabodv; Ph.D., Ohio State 



Victor Faccinto (1978) 

B.A., M.A., California 

Larrv R. Henson (1981) 

B.A., Berea; M.S., Missouri 

David B. Lew (1976) 

B.M., M.A., Ph.D., Eastman 

Rodney Meyer (1980) 

B.A., Broun; M.A., Ph.D.. Minnesota 

Harold S. Moore (1953) 
B.M.E.. Virginia 

Herman J. Preseren (1953) Director of the Educational Media Cente 

B.S., California State (Pennsylvania); M.A., Columbia; 
Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Henry B. Stokes (1977) Director of Denominational Relation 

B.A., Wake Forest; Th.B.. Southern Baptist Seminary 



Director of the Art Caller 

Director of Computer Cente'. 

Director of Concert 

Director of the Offic 
for Grants and Contract' 

Director of the Physical Plan 



Harold C. Tedford (1965) 

B.A., Ouachita; M.A., Arkansas; Ph.D.. Louisiana State 

Donald H. Wolfe (1968) 

B.S., M.S., Southern Illinois; Ph.D., Cornell 



Director of Theatn 
Associate Director of Theatr 




The art gallery in the Scales Fine Arts Center. 



119 



The Graduate Faculty 



Date following name indicates year of appointment. 



brahim Z. Ades (1979) 

B.A., Ph.D., California (Los Angeles) 

Charles M. Allen (1941) 

B.S., M.A., Wake Forest; Ph.D.. Duke 



Assistant Professor of Biochemists 
Professor of Biology 



lalph D. Amen (1962) Associate Professor of Biology 

B.A., M.A., Northern Colorado; M.B.S., Ph.D., Colorado 



ohn William Angell (1955) 

B.A., Wake Forest; Th.M., Southern Baptist Seminary; 
S.T.M., Andover Newton; Th.D., Southern Baptist Seminary 



Professor of Religion 



anN. Angelo (1977) 

B.S., Simmons; M.D., Tufts 



Assistant Professor of Pathology (Neuropathology); 
Associate in Neurology 

Lecturer in Psychology 

Professor of Chemistry 

Professor of Anthropology 

Associate Professor of History 



Irian M. Austin (1975) 

B.A., Monmouth; M.S.Ed., Ph.D., Southern Illinois 

i. Wallace Baird (1963) 

B.A., Berea; Ph.D., Wisconsin 

iugene Pendleton Banks (1954) 

B.A., Furman; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard 

pmes P. Barefield (1963) 

B.A., M.A., Rice; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 

ialph W. Barnes (1969) Research Associate Professor of Neurology 

B.S.E.E., Duke; M.S.E., Pennsylvania; Ph.D., Duke (Medical Sonics) 

Lichard Chambers Barnett (1961) 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.Ed., Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel H 

•avid A. Bass (1976) 

B.A., Yale; M.D., Johns Hopkins; 
Ph.D., Oxford 



Professor of History 



Associate Professor of Medicine 
(Infectious Disease and Immunology) 



ohn V. Baxley (1968) 

B.S., M.S., Georgia Tech; Ph.D., Wisconsin 

.obertC. Beck (1959) 
B.A., Ph.D., Illinois 

aul A. Berberian (1979) 

B.A., Boston; Ph.D., Miami 

lerrill G. Berthrong (1964) 

B.A., Tufts; M.A., Fletcher; Ph.D.. Pennsylvania 



Professor of Mathematics 

Professor of Psychology 

Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

Associate Professor of History 



'Absent on leave, 1981-82. 



120 



Deborah L. Best (1972) Assistant Professor of Psycholog 

B.A., Wake Forest University; Ph.D., University of North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 



David M. Biddulph (1970) 

B.S., Utah; M.S., Ph.D., Illinois 

Ramunas Bigelis (1979) 

B.S., Illinois; Ph.D., Purdue 

David A. Blizard (1980) 
B.A., Ph.D.. Wales 

Walter J. Bo (1960) 

B.S., M.S., Marquette; Ph.D. .Cincinnati 

M. Gene Bond (1974) 

B.S., M.S.. Ph.D., Ohio State 

William H. Boyce (1952) 

B.S.. Davidson; M.D., Yanderbilt 



Robert W. Brehme (1959) 

B.S., Roanoke; M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hi 

Alvin Brodish (1975) 

B.A., Drake: M.S., Iowa; Ph.D., Vale 

Carole Lvnn Browne (1980) 

B.S., Hartford; Ph.D., Syracuse 

Robert Albert Browne (1980) 

B.S., Davton; Ph.D., Syracuse 

George McLeod Brvan (1956) 

B.A., M.A., Wake Forest; B.D., Ph.D., Vale 



Associate Professor of Anatom 
Assistant Professor of Biologi 
Associate Professor of Physiolog 
Professor of Anatom 



Assistant Professor of Comparative Medicim 
Associate in Anatomy and Neurolot 



Professor of Urolo^ 

Professor of Physii 

Professor of Physiolo^ ! 

Assistant Professor of Biolo^ 

Assistant Professor of Biolo^ 

Professor of Religio 



Vardaman M. Buckalewjr. (1973) 



Professor of Medicine (Nephrolog 



B.A., North Carolina (Chapel Hill); M.D.. Pennsylvania and Physiolo^ 

Bill C. Bullock (1965) Associate Professor of Comparative Medics 

D.V.M., Texas A & M 

Jerry M. Burger (1980) Assistant Professor of Psycholog 

B.S. M.S., California State (Fresno); Ph.D., University of Missouri (Columbia) 



*Julian C. Burroughs Jr. (1958) 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Ph.D., Michigan 

Richard D. Carmichael (1971) 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.A., Ph.D., Duke 

John Archer Carter Jr. (1961) 

B.A.. Virginia; M.A., Ph.D.. Princeton 

David W. Catron (1963) 

B.A., Furman; Ph.D., George Peabody 

Maxine L. Clark (1980) 



Professor of Speech Communicatic 

Professor of Mathemati 

Professor of Englu 

Associate Professor of Psycholo{ 

Assistant Professor of Psycholog 



B.A., University of Cincinnati; A. M., Ph.D.. University of Illinois 



* Absent on leave, spring 1982 



121 



rhomas B. Clarkson Jr. ( 1 957) Professor of Comparative Medicine 

D.V.M., Georgia 

ohn E. Collins (1970) Associate Professor of Religion 

B.S., M.S., Tennessee; B.D., Southeastern Baptist Seminary; Ph.D., Princeton 

Vayne T. Corbett (1978) Assistant Professor of Epidemiology 

B.S., Pennsylvania State; (Community Medicine) 

V.M.D., Pennsylvania; M.P.H.. Dr.P.H., Pittsburgh 

l. Robert Cordell (1957) Professor of Surgery (Cardiothoracic); 

B.S., North Carolina (Chapel Hill); M.D., Johns Hopkins Associate in Physiology 

Jancy Cotton (1977) Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Texas; M.A., Wisconsin; Ph.D., Columbia 

:yclone Covey ( 1 968) Professor of History 

B.A., Ph.D., Stanford 

Dhn R. Crouse III (1980) Assistant Professor of Medicine 

B.A., Michigan; M.D., State (Endocrinology and General Medicine) 

University of New York, Dovvnstate Medical Center 

iarol C. Cunningham (1970) Associate Professor of Biochemistry 

B.S., M.S., Oklahoma State; Ph.D., Illinois 

atricia M. Cunningham (1978) Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A., Rhode Island; M.S. .Florida State; Ed. S., Indiana State; Ph.D., Georgia 

J3.n W. F. Davidson (1961) Professor of Pharmacology; 

B.S., Manitoba; M.A., Ph.D.Toronto Associate in Physiology 

amuel A. Deadwyler (1977) Associate Professor of Physiology 

B.A., San Diego State; Ph.D., State University of New York (Stony Brook) 

awrence R. DeChatelet (1969) Professor of Biochemistry; 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Loyola Research Associate in Medicine 

onald V. Dimock Jr. (1970) Associate Professor of Biology 

B.A., New Hampshire; M.S., Florida State; Ph.D., California 

'illiam H. Dodge (1975) Associate Professor (Experimental Medicine); 

B.S., Millsaps; M.S., Ph.D., Mississippi Associate in Microbiology 

and Immunology 

eorge J . Doellgast ( 1 976) Associate Professor of Biochemistry; 

B.S., Fordham; B.S., Columbia; Associate in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Ph.D., Purdue s - 

■rome R. Dollard ( 1 98 1 ) Adjunct Professor of Religion 

B.A., St. Benedict's College; S.T.B., Belmont Abbey Seminary; 
M.A., Ph.D., Catholic University of America 

,enry Drexler ( 1 964) Professor of Microbiology 

B.S., Pennsylvania State; Ph.D., Rochester 

obert H . Dufort (1961) Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Ph.D., Duke ' S " 



Absent on leave, spring 1982. 



Claud E. Dunlap III (1979) Assistant Professor of Pharmacolo 

B.S., Ph.D., Florida 

Robert Allen Dyer (1956) Professor of Religi\ 

B.A., Louisiana State; Th.M., Ph.D., Southern Baptist Seminary 

J. Charles Eldridge (1978) Assistant Professor of Physiold 

B.A., North Central; M.S., Northern Illinois; and Pharmacolo 

Ph.D., Medical College of Georgia 

Thomas M. Elmore (1962) Professor of Educational and Counseling Psychoid 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., George Peabody; Ph.D., Ohio State 

Gerald W. Esch (1965) Professor of Biolo, 

B.S., Colorado College; M.S., Ph.D., Oklahoma 

Andrew V. Ettin (1977) Associate Professor of EngL 

B.A., Rutgers; M.A., Ph.D., Washington 

Herman E. Eure (1974) Associate Professor of Biolc 

B.S., Maryland State; Ph.D., Wake Forest 

David K. Evans (1966) Associate Professor of Anthropok 

B.S., Tulane; Ph.D., California 

Donald L. Evans (1975) Associate Professor of Microbiok- 

B.S., M.S., Missouri; Ph.D., Arkansas and Immunolw 

Philippe R. Falkenberg (1969) Associate Professor of Psycholv 

B.A., Queen's (Ontario); Ph.D., Duke 

Daniel J. Fernandes (1980) Assistant Professor of Biochemist 

B.S., Providence College; Ph.D. George Washington 

Walter S. Flory (1963-1980) Babcock Professor Emeritus of Botau 

B.A., Sc.D., Bridgewater; M.A., Ph.D., Virginia 

Doyle Richard Fosso (1964) Professor of Engl'. 

A.B., Harvard; M. A. .Michigan; Ph.D., Harvard 

*Ivey C. Gentry (1949) Professor of Mathemai; 

B.S., Wake Forest; B.S., New York; M.A., Ph.D., Duke 

Balkrishna G. Gokhale (1960) Professor of History and Asian Stum- 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Bombay 

Harold O. Goodman (1958) Professor of Medical Genetics (Pediatric. 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Minnesota Adjunct Professor of BiojM 

Thomas Frank Gossett (1967) Professor of Engh 

B.A., M.A., Southern Methodist; Ph.D.. Minnesota 

Frank C. Greiss Jr. (1960) Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecoht 

B.A., M.D., Pennsylvania 

Paul M. Gross Jr., (1959) Associate Professor of Chemi 

B.S., Duke; Ph.D., Brown 



* Absent on leave, spring 1982. 



123 



.enneth A. Gruber (1976) 

B.A., Washington Square; Ph.D., New York 

hn P. Gusdonjr. (1967) 
B.A., M.D., Virginia 

lavid W. Hadley (1966) 

B.A., Wake Forest; A.M., Ph.D.. Harvard 

mmett W. Hamrick (1952) 

B.A., North Carolina (Chapel Hill); Ph.D., Duke 

hillipj. Hamrick Jr. (1956) 

B.S., Morris Harvey; Ph.D., Duke 

phn W. Hartz (1974) 

B.A., Albion; Ph.D., Wisconsin; M.D.. Harvard 

sbrand Haven (1965) 

Candidate, Doctorandus, Doctor, Groningen 

Imer K. Hayashi (1973) Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., California (Davis); M.S., San Diego State; Ph.D., Illinois 

[ichael D. Hazen (1974) Associate Professor of Speech Communication 

B.A., Seattle Pacific; M.A., Wake Forest; Ph.D., Kansas 

oger A. Hegstrom (1969) 

B.A., St. Olaf; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard 



Research Associate Professor 
of Medicine (Nephrology) 

Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology; 
Associate in Microbiology 

Associate Professor of History 
Professor of Religion 
Professor of Chemistry 
Assistant Professor of Pathology 
Professor of Physics 



Professor of Chemistry 



ugene R. Heise (1969) Associate Professor of Microbiology; 

B.S., Wittenberg; M.S., Iowa; Ph.D., Wake Forest Associate in Surgery 



Edwin Hendricks Jr. (1961) 

B.A., Furman; M.A., Ph.D., Virginia 

raig K. Henkel (1978) 

B.S., Wheaton; Ph.D., Ohio State 

Nash Herndon (1942) 

B.A., Duke; M.D., Jefferson 

vid Allen Hills (1960) 

B.A., Kansas; M.A., Ph.D., Iowa 

i'illieL. Hinze (1975) 

B.S., M.A.,Sam Houston State; Ph.D., Texas A & M 

ed L. Horton Jr. (1970) Associate Professor of Religion 

B.A., North Carolina (Chapel Hill); B.D., Union Seminary; Ph.D., Duke 

illiam L. Hottinger ( 1 970) Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., Slippery Rock; M.S., Ph.D., Illinois 



Professor of History 

Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

Professor of Medical Genetics 

Associate Professor of Psychology 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 



edric T. Howard (1966) 

B.A., M.A., Vanderbilt; Ph.D., Duke 



Professor of Ma/hematics 



* Absent on leave, spring 1982. 
* Absent on leave, 1981-82. 



124 



Frank H. Hulcher (1958) 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic 

Carolyn C. Huntley (1957) 

A.B., Mount Holyoke; M.D., Duke 

Phillip M. Hutchins (1970) 

B.S., North Carolina State; M.S., Ph.D., Wake Forest 

Sarah E. Hutslar (1977) 

B.S., Ohio State; M.E., Miami (Ohio); 
Ph.D., Ohio State 

Thomas H. Irving (1967) 

B.A., Pennsylvania State; M.D., Hahnemann 

Charles F. Jackels (1977) 

B. Chem., Minnesota; Ph.D., Washington 

Susan C. Jackels (1977) 

B.A., Carleton; Ph.D., Washington 

MordecaiJ. Jaffe (1980) 

B.S., City College of New York; Ph.D., Cornell 

Richard Janeway (1966) 

B.A., Colgate; M.D., Pennsylvania 

Joseph E.Johnson III (1972) 
B.A., M.D., Vanderbilt 

W. Dillon Johnston (1973) 

B.A., Vanderbilt; M.A., Columbia; Ph.D., Virginia 

Richard R. Marriott Jones (1980) 

B.S., Tennessee; Ph.D., California 
Institute of Technology 

Jay R. Kaplan (1979) Assistant Professor of Comparative Medici, 

B.A., Swarthmore; M.A., Ph.D., Northwestern 

John S. Kaufmann (1962, 1970) Associate Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseasi 
B.S., M.D., Ph.D., Wake Forest 



Associate Professor of Biochemist 

Professor of Pediatri 

Professor of Physioloi 

Visiting Assistant Professi 
of Physical Educatk 

Professor of Anesthesil 
Associate in Pharmacolof 

Assistant Professor of Chemist 

Assistant Professor of Chemist 

Babcock Professor of Botai 

Professor of Neurolog 
Research Associate in Radiohj 

Professor of Medich 

Associate Professor of Engli 

Assistant Professor of Chemist 



Alonzo W. Kenion (1956) 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Duke 

William C. Kerr (1970) 

B.S., Wooster; Ph.D.. Cornell 

Bill A. Kilpatrick (1980) 

B.S., Milligan; M.S., East Tennessee State; 
Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 



Associate Professor of Pharmacolo 
Professor of Engli 

Associate Professor of Physi 

Assistant Professor of Biochemist 

Associate in Microbiolo 

and Immunolo 



Ellen Kirkman (1975) 

B.A., Wooster; M.A., M.S., Ph.D., Michigan State 



Associate Professor of Mathemat 



C.Jeffrey Kovacs (1981) 
B.S., Siena College; 
M.S., Ph.D., St. Johns 



Associate Professor of Radiology (Radiobiology 
Associate in Microbiology and Immunolo 



125 

.mold S. Kreger (1971) Associate Professor of Microbiology 

B.S.. Brooklyn; M.S., Ph.D., Michigan 

fayne A. Krueger (1970) Associate Professor of Anatomy 

B.S., M.S., John Carroll; Ph.D., Illinois 

ouis S. Kucera (1970) Professor of Microbiology 

B.S., St. John's; M.S., Creighton; Ph.D., Missouri 

aymond E. Kuhn (1968) Professor of Biology 

B.S., Carson-Newman; Ph.D., Tennessee 

jmes Kuzmanovich (1972) Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Rose Polytechnic; Ph.D., Wisconsin 

hilip W. Landfield (1979) Assistant Professor of Physiology 

B.A., California (Berkeley); Ph.D., California (Irvine) 

( ugo C. Lane (1973) Assistant Professor of Biology 

Licenciate of the Biological Sciences, Doctorate of the Biological Sciences, Geneva 

oel D. M. Lehner (1966) Associate Professor of Comparative Medicine 

B.S., D.V.M., Illinois; M.S., Wake Forest 

:elvin Levitt (1970) Associate Professor of Physiology 

B.S., M.A., Roosevelt; Ph.D., Michigan State 

in C. Lewis (1977) Associate Professor of Pathology 

B.S., M.S., Houston; Ph.D., Kansas 

phn H. Litcher (1973) Associate Professor of Education 

B.S., Winona State; M.A., Ph.D., Minnesota 

|aw-Shung Liu (1978) Associate Professor of Physiology 

D.D.S., Kaohsiung Medical College (Taiwan); M.S., Kentucky; Ph.D., Ottawa 

illiam B. Lorentz Jr. (1974) Professor of Pediatrics 

B.A., West Virginia; M.D., Jefferson 

imuel H. Love (1955) Associate Professor of Microbiology 

B.A., Virginia; M.S., Miami (Ohio); Ph.D., Pennsylvania 

bbert W. Lovett (1962, 1968) Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Oglethorpe; M.A., Ph.D., Emory 

ouglas S. Lyles (1978) Assistant Professor of Microbiology 

B.A., Pennsylvania; Ph.D., Mississippi and Immunology 

hn R. Lymangrover (1980) Assistant Professor of Physiology 

B.S., Xavier; M.S., Kentucky; Ph.D., Cincinnati 

tarles E. McCall (1968) Professor of Medicine (Infectious Disease); 

B.S., M.D., Wake Forest Associate in Physiology and Pharmacology 

toes G. McCormick ( 1 970) Research Associate Professor of Otolaryngology 

B.S., Bucknell; M.A., Ph.D., Princeton (Physiological Acoustics) 

;iarles E. McCreight (1954) Associate Professor of Anatomy 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., George Washington 

mes C. McDonald (1960) Professor of Biology 

B.A., Washington; M.A., Ph.D., Missouri 



126 



James G. McDowell (1965) Associate Professor of HisU 
B.A., Colgate; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 

William M. McKinney (1963) Professor of Neurohj 
B.A., North Carolina (Chapel Hill); M.D., Virginia Research Associate in Radiolr 

Mary Ruth McMahan (1974) Assistant Professor of Patholoj 

B.S., Stetson; M.A., Kansas; Associate in Microbiology and Immunolc 
Ph.D., Iowa State 



« 



George Eric Matthews ( 1 979) Assistant Professor of Phy. 

B.S., Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

J. Gaylord May (1961) Professor of Mathemau 

B.S., Wofford; M.A., Ph.D.. Virginia 

W. Graham May (1961) Professor of Mathemau 

B.S.,Wofford; M.A., Ph.D., Virginia 

Jesse H. Meredith (1958) Professor of Surg i 

B.A., Elon; M.D., Case Western Reserve 

Isadore Meschan (1955) Professor of Radwlo; 

B.A., M.A., M.D., Case Western Reserve Associate in Anatof 

Harry B. Miller (1947) Professor of Chemui 

B.S., Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

InglisJ. Miller Jr. (1971) Associate Professor of Anatof 

B.S., Ohio State; Ph.D., Florida State 

Joseph O. Milner (1969) Associate Professor of Educati 

B.A., Davidson; M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Carlton T. Mitchell (1961) Professor of Religi 

B.A., Wake Forest; B.D., Yale; S.T.M., Union Seminary: Ph.D., New York 

Edward J. Modest (1980) Professor of BiochemLs 

A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Harvard 

Mariana Morris (1976) Assistant Professor of Physioh 

B.A., Colorado; Ph.D., Texas (Dallas) 

William M. Moss (1971) Associate Professor of Engh 

B.A., Davidson; Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Thomas E. Mullen (1957) Professor of Hisil 

B.A., Rollins; M.A., Ph.D., Emory 

Richard T. Myers (1950) Professor of Surg) 

B.A., North Carolina (Chapel Hill); M.D., Pennsylvania 



) 



Quentin N. Myrvik (1963) Professor of Microbio. 

B.S., M.S.'. Ph.D., Washington 

Linda Nielsen (1974) Assistant Professor of Educatn 
B.A., Stetson; M.S., Ed.D., Tennessee 

Ronald E. Noftle (1967) Professor of Chemty 

B.S., New Hampshire; Ph.D., Washington 



127 

ohn W. Nowell (1945) Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

V. Thomas Olive (1961) Associate Professor of Biology 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina State 

V. Keith O'Steen (1976) Professor of Anatomy 

B.A., M.S., Emory; Ph.D., Duke 

Wallace Parce ( 1 980) Assistant Professor of Biochemistry 

B.A., Western Maryland; Ph.D., Wake Forest 

ohn E. Parker Jr. (1950) Professor of Education and Romance Languages 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Ph.D., Syracuse 

■any A. Pearce (1969) Associate Professor of Neurology; 

B.S., M.D., Wake Forest Associate in Pharmacology 

'ercival Perry (1939, 1947) Professor of History 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Rutgers; Ph.D., Duke 

)arwin W. Peterson (1973) Assistant Professor of Physiology 

B.S., M.S., Nevada; Ph.D., Alabama ' 

.lizabeth Phillips (1957) Professor of English 

B.A., Woman's College, North Carolina; M.A., Iowa; Ph.D., Pennsylvania 

ames R. Philp (1973) Professor of Medicine (Infectious 

M.B., Ch.B., B.Sc, M.R.C.P., M.D., Edinburgh Disease and Immunology) 



.ee Harris Potter ( 1 965) Professor of English 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

lerman J. Preseren (1953) Professor of Education 

B.S., California State (Pennsylvania); M.A., Columbia; 
Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

.obert W. Prichard ( 1 95 1 ) Professor of Pathology 

M.D., George Washington 

; Don Reeves (1967) Professor of Education 

B.A., Mercer; B.D., Th.M., Southern Baptist Seminary; Ed.D., Columbia 

/alter Rejeski (1978) Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., Norwich; M.A., Ph.D., Connecticut 

hades N. Remy (1962) Professor of Biochemistry 

B.S., Syracuse; Ph.D., New York Upstate Medical Center 

aul M . Ribisl (1973) Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., Pittsburgh; M.A., Kent State; Ph.D., Illinois 

!ichael J. Ricardo Jr. ( 1 98 1 ) Assistant Professor of Microbiology 

B.S., Florida; M.A., South Florida; and Immunolon- 

Ph.D., Georgia S - 

ephen H. Richardson (1963) Professor of Microbiology; 

B.A., California; M.S., Ph.D., Southern California Adjunct Professor of Biology 

harles L. Richman ( 1 968) Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Virginia; M.S., Yeshiva; Ph.D., Cincinnati 



Ward A. Riley Jr. (1976) Research Assistant Professor I 

B.A., Kalamazoo College; Neurology (Medical Sonic 

M.S., Michigan State: Ph.D., Southern Illinois 

l 

Leonard P. Roberge (1974) Assistant Professor of Educatic 

B.A., New Hampshire; M.A., Atlanta; Ed.D., Maine 

James C. Rose (1976) Assistant Professor of Physiolog 

B.S., Richmond; M.S., Ph.D.. Associate in Obstetrics and GynecoM 

Medical College of Virginia 

Raymond C. Rov (1978) Assistant Professor of Aneslhes 

B.S., Pennsylvania; Ph.D., Duke; M.D., Tulane 

Paul Kevin Rudeen (1977) Assistant Professor of Anator. 

B.S., Utah State; Ph.D., Texas (San Antonio) 

Lawrence L. Rudel (1973) Associate Professor of Comparative Medicin 

B.S., Colorado; M.S., Ph.D., Arkansas Associate in Biochemist- 

Richard W. St. Clair (1967) Professor of Pathology (Physiologk 

B.S., Ph.D., Colorado State 

John W. Sawyer (1956) Professor of Mathemati 

B.A., M.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Ph.D., Missouri 

Harry M. Schey (1978) Assistant Professor of Biostatisti 

B.S., Northwestern; A.M., Harvard; Ph.D., Illinois 

Ben M. Seelbinder (1959) Professor of Mathemati 

B.A., Mississippi Delta State; M.A.. Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

V. Sagar Sethi (1977) Research Associate Professor of Medicine (Hematology/Oncolog 
B.S., M.S., Banaras (India): Associate in Microbiology and tmmunolo 

Ph.D., Munich 

Howard W. Shields (1958) Professor of Ph\s, 

B.S., North Carolina (Chapel Hill): M.S., Pennsylvania; Ph.D., Duke 

Zakariva K. Shihabi (1972) Associate Professor of Patholo 

B.S., Alexandria; M.S., Texas A & M; Ph.D.. South Dakota (Clinical Chemist), | 

Franklin R. Shirley (1948) Professor of Speech Communicat'n 

B.A., Ceorgetown College; M.A., Columbia; Ph.D., Florida 

Robert N. Shorter (1958) Professor of Engli 

B.A., Union College; M.A.. Ph.D., Duke 

N. Sheldon Skinner Jr. (1972) Professor of Medicine (Cardiology) and PhysioM 

B.S., Auburn; M.D.. Alabama 

David L. Smilev (1950) Professor of Hist c 

B.A., M.A., Baylor; Ph.D., Wisconsin 

J. Howell Smith (1965) Associate Professor of Histc 

B.A., Baylor; M.A., Tulane; Ph.D., Wisconsin 

Peter B. Smith (1976) Associate Professor of Biochemisti 

B.S., Spring Hill; Ph.D., Tennessee Associate i?i A ! eurolo\ 

Cecilia Solano (1977) Assistant Professor of Psychoh 

B.A., Radcliife: M.A., Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 



129 

Slanche C. Speer (1972) Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Howard Payne; M.A., Ph.D.. Colorado 

Varies L. Spurr (1957) Professor of Medicine (Hematology/Oncology) 

B.S., Bucknell; M.S.. M.D., Rochester S ' 

ack W. Strandhov (1973) Associate Professor of Pharmacology 

B.S., Illinois; M.S., Ph.D., Iowa 

lornelius F. Strittmatter IV (1961) Professor of Biochemistry 

B.S., Juniata; Ph.D., Harvard 

lenry Smith Stroupe (1937) Professor of History 

B.S., M.A., Wake Forest; Ph.D., Duke 

dward H. Stullken Jr. (1978) Assistant Professor of Anesthesia 

A.B., DePauw; M.D., Illinois 

obert L. Sullivan ( 1 962) Professor of Biology 

B.A., Delaware; M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina State 

■avid K. Sundberg (1976) Assistant Professor of Physiology 

B.S., Pacific Lutheran; Ph.D., Texas (Dallas) 

harles H. Talbert (1963) Professor of Religion 

B.A., Howard; B.D., Southern Baptist Seminary; Ph.D., Vanderbilt 

arold C. Tedford ( 1 965) Professor of Theatre Arts 

B.A., Ouachita; M.A., Arkansas; Ph.D., Louisiana State 

anton K. Tefft ( 1 964) Professor of Anthropology 

B.A., Michigan State; M.S., Wisconsin; Ph.D., Minnesota 

'ichael J. Thomas (1980) Assistant Professor of Biochemistry; 

B.S., Indiana; Ph.D., California Research Associate in Medicine 

(Infectious Disease) 

:mes F. Toole (1962) Walter C. Teagle Professor of Neurology 

B.A., Princeton; M.D., Cornell; LL.B., LaSalle 

[berto Trillo (1975) Associate Professor of Pathology; 

M.D., Mexico; Ph.D., Western Ontario Associate in Comparative Medicine 

mes £. Turner (1974) Associate Professor of Anatomy 

B.A., Virginia Military; M.S., Richmond; Ph.D., Tennessee 

ichael Tytell ( 1 980) Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

B.A., Queens (New York); M.S., Purdue; 
Ph.D., Baylor College of Medicine 

arcellus E. Waddill ( 1 962) Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Hampden-Sydney; M.A., Ph.D., Pittsburgh 

illiam D. Wagner (1972) Associate Professor of Comparative Medicine 

B.S., Geneva; M.S., Ph.D., West Virginia 

:>seley Waite (1967) Professor of Biochemistry 

B.S., Rollins; Ph.D., Duke 

nedict L. Wasilauskas (1971) Associate Professor of Pathology 

B.S., Mount St. Mary's; Ph.D., Connecticut (Clinical Microbiology); 

Associate in Microbiology 



130 



David S. Weaver (1977) 

B.A., M.A., Arizona; Ph.D., New Mexico 

Beverly Anne Weeks (1979) 

B.A., Winthrop; Ph.D., North Carolina State 

Peter D. Weigl (1968) 

B.A., Williams; Ph.D., Duke 

J. Courtland White (1980) 

B.A., Eastern; Ph.D., Virginia 

Alan J. Williams (1974) 

B.A., Stanford; M. Phil., Ph.D., Yale 



George P. Williams Jr. (1958) 

B.S., Richmond; M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hi 

JohnE. Williams (1959) 

B.A., Richmond; M.A., Ph.D., Iowa 

Edwin Graves Wilson (1946, 1951) 

B.A., Wake Forest; A.M.. Ph.D., Harvard 

Richard L. Witcofski (1961) 

B.S., Lynchburg; M.S., Vanderbilt; Ph.D., Wake Forest 

Donald H. Wolfe (1968) 

B.S., M.S., Southern Illinois; Ph.D., Cornell 



Assistant Professor of Anthropoid 

Assistant Professor of Microbiolu 
and Immunola 

Professor of Biola 

Assistant Professor of Biochemist 

Associate Professor of Histu 

Professor of Phys: 

Professor of Psychoid 

Professor of Engl i 



Professor of Radiolof 
Associate in Neurohi 



Associate Professor of Theatre Ai 



Frank B. Wood (1975) Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psycholo:. 

B.A., M.A., Wake Forest; M. Div., Associate Professor of Neurohi 

Southeastern Baptist Seminary; Ph.D., Duke and Psychiatry (Neuropsycholo.) 

Ralph C. Wood Jr. (1971) Associate Professor of Religil 

B.A., M.A., East Texas State; M.A., Ph.D., Chicago 

J. Ned Woodall (1969) Associate Professor of Anthropoid 

B.A., M.A., Texas; Ph.D., Southern Methodist 

Raymond L. Wyatt (1956) Professor of Biolti 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Robert L. Wykle (1980) 

B.S., Western Carolina; 

Ph.D., University of Tennessee Center for the Health Sciences 

*W. Buck Yearns Jr. (1945) Professor of Hist 

B.A., Duke; M.A.,Georgia; Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 



Research Associate Professor of Biochemis* 



' 



Richard L. Zuber (1962) 

B.A., Appalachian; M.A., Emory; Ph.D., Duke 



Professor of Hism 



* Absent on leave, 1981-82 



131 



The Graduate Council 

Provost of the University 

Dean of the Graduate School, Chairman 

Associate Dean for Biomedical Graduate Studies 

Professor Richard C. Barnett (term expires 1983) 

Professor John Archer Carter Jr. (term expires 1982) 

Professor Michael D. Hazen (term expires 1984) 

Professor Roger A. Hegstrom (term expires 1982) 

Professor Louis Kucera (term expires 1984) 

Professor Raymond E. Kuhn (term expires 1984) 

Professor James Kuzmanovich (term expires 1983) 

Professor Stephen H. Richardson (term expires 1983) 

Professor Jack W. Strandhoy (term expires 1982) 



VI 




John Williard, vice president and treasurer. 



Bulletins of Wake Forest University 



The College 

Director of Admissions and Financial Aid 

7305 Reynolda Station 

Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109 

919-761-5201 

The Graduate School 

Dean of the Graduate School 

7487 Reynolda Station 

Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109 

919-761-5301 

The School of Law 

Director of Admissions 

7206 Revnolda Station 

Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109 

919-761-5437 

The Babcock Graduate School of Management 

Director of Admissions 

7659 Reynolda Station 

Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109 

919-761-5422 

The Bowman Gray School of Medicine 

Associate Dean for Admissions 

300 Hawthorne Road 

Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27103 

919-727-4265 

The Summer Session 

Dean of the Summer Session 

7293 Reynolda Station 

Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109 

919-761-5227 

Marty Lentz, University Editor 
Terry Hvdell, Assistant 



Wake Forest University administers all educational and employment activities without discrw 
nation because of race, color, religion, national origin, age, handicap, or sex, except wht^ 
exempt. 



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Bulletin of the 

Summer Session 

1982 



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New Series 



March 1982 



Volume 77. Number 2 



if^S***, 




Bulletin of the 

Wake Forest University 

Summer Session 



Announcements for 

1982 



The Bulletin of Wake Forest University is published seven times annually by the University at Winston-Salem. North Carolina 

Second class postage paid at Winston-Salem. North Carolina. 

USPS 078-320 

Printed by Winston Printing Company. Winston-Salem. North Carolina 27105 



The Calendar 



May 26 Wednesday 



Mav 29 
May 31 



June 



1 



June 12 

June 26 

June 28 

June 29 



July 3 

July 7 

July 8 

July 10 

August 5 

August 6 



First Term May 26 -June 29, 1982 

Undergraduate registration. 9:00 a.m. -12 noon 
110 Reynolda Hall 

Graduate registration. 9:00 a.m. -12:00 noon 
210 Reynolda Hall 

Classes begin in the afternoon 
Saturday Classes meet 

Monday Last day for late registration 

Tuesday Last day for dropping a class without penalty 

Last day for withdrawal with pro rata refund 
Saturday Classes meet 

Saturday Classes meet 

Monday Final examinations begin 

Tuesday Final examinations end 



Second Term 



July 1 - August 6. 1982 



July 1 Thursday 



Saturday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Saturday 
Thursday 
Friday 



Undergraduate registration. 900 a.m. -12 noon 

110 Reynolda Hall 
Graduate registration. 9:00 a.m. -12:00 noon 

210 Reynolda Hall 
Classes begin in the afternoon 
Holiday 

Last day for late registration 
Last day for dropping a class without penalty 
Last day for withdrawal with pro rata refund 
Classes meet 
Final examinations begin 
Final examinations end 







May 13-June 10 
May 30-June 4 
June 6-June 16 
June 13-June 19 
June 13-June 26 
June 13-July 3 
June 14-June 23 
June 24-June 25 
June 14-July 2 
June 14— July 5 
June 18-June 19 
June 20^July 9 
June 20-June 26 
June21-July 17 
June 21-July 30 

June 21^July 2 
June 28-July 3 
June 28-July 18 
June 27-July 2 
June 27-July 2 
June 27^June 30 
July 1-August 3 
July 4-July 9 
July 4-July 9 
July 5^July 16 
July 5^July 17 
July 5-July 24 
July 5-Aug. 13 
July 6-July 23 
July ll^July 15 
July ll-Ju!y 16 
July 11-July 17 
July 12-July 16 
July 15-July 18 
July 18-July 23 
July 18^July 25 
July 19-Aug. 14 
July 25^July 30 



Special Programs May 26-August 6, 1982 

Swiss French Civilization 

Baptist Summer Mission Training Program 

Holy Land Tour 

American Legion Boys' State 

Golf Camp for Boys (First Session) 

Golf Camp for Boys (Super Session I) 

American College of Sports Medicine Workshop 

American College of Sports Medicine Certification Session 

Learning to Learn for High School Students 

Anthropological Field Project in Honduras 

Marching Band Workshop for High School Band Directors 

High School Athletic Trainers 

Tennis Camp (First Session) 

Program for Teachers on Teaching the Gifted (First Session) 

American Foundations Interdisciplinary Program in History, 

Literature, Art, and Music 

Wake Forest Sports Camp (First Session) 

Debate Workshop for High School Debate Coaches 

Debate Workshop for High School Students 

Tennis Camp (Second Session) 

Lady Deacons Basketball Camp (First Session) 

Marching Auxiliaries of America 

Field Research in Biblical Archeology in Caesarea 

Tennis Camp (Third Session) 

Lady Deacons Basketball Camp (Second Session) 

Wake Forest Sports Camp (Second Session) 

Golf Camp for Boys (Second Session) 

Golf Camp for Boys (Super Session II) 

Archeological Field Study in Yadkin County, North Carolina 

Learning to Learn for High School Students (Second Session) 

Wake Forest Cheerleaders Clinic (First Session) 

Basketball Camp for Boys (First Session) 

Spiritual Frontiers Fellowship 

Pastors Conference 

Order of the Arrow, Boy Scouts of America 

Basketball Camp for Boys (Second Session) 

Wake Forest Cheerleaders Clinic (Second Session) 

Program for Teachers on Teaching the Gifted (Second Session) 

Basketball Camp for Boys (Third Session) 




The Reynolda Campus 



The Bulletin 



The Calendar 2 

The University 5 

The Summer Session 9 

Procedures 12 

Admission 12 

Health Certification 13 

Admission of Handicapped Students 13 

Room Charges 13 

Tuition and Fees 14 

Withdrawal and Refund 14 

Financial Aid 14 

Employment Opportunities 15 

Veteran Benefits 15 

Housing Services and Regulations 15 

Student Services 17 

Vehicle Regulations 18 

Registration lg 

Class Regulations 19 

Grading . . 20 

Honor System 20 

Special Programs 22 

Master of Arts in Education 22 

Special Programs for Teachers on Teaching the Gifted 22 

American Foundations Program in History 22 

Swiss French Civilization .23 

European Geography Study Tour 24 

Seminar in the Mediterranean World and Holy Land Tour 24 

Interdisciplinary Overseas Research Program 24 

Archeological Field School in Yadkin County. North Carolina 24 

Archeological Field School in Caesarea 25 

American College of Sports Medicine Workshops 25 

Marching Band Workshop for High School Band Directors 25 

Debate Workshops for High School Students and Coaches 25 

Boys' State Program in Citizenship for High School Students 25 

Wake Forest University Cheerleaders Camp 26 

Summer Golf Program 26 

Basketball Camp 26 

Sports Camp 27 

Registration, Class, and Exam Schedules 28 

Courses of Instruction 29 

Anthropology 29 

Biology 30 

Business and Accountancy 30 

Accountancy 31 



Chemistry 31 

Economics 32 

Education 32 

English 34 

French 35 

History 35 

Humanities 36 

Mathematics 37 

Military Science 37 

Music 38 

Philosophy 38 

Physical Education 38 

Physics 38 

Politics 39 

Psychology 39 

Religion 40 

Sociology 41 

Spanish 41 

Speech Communication and Theatre Arts 42 

The Administration 44 

The Summer Faculty 46 

Campus Map 50 




The University 



Wake Forest University is characterized by its devotion to liberal arts learning and 
professional preparation for men and women, its strong sense of community and fel- 
lowship, and its encouragement of free inquiry and expression. 

Founded in 1834 by the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina, the school opened 
its doors to students on February 3 as Wake Forest Institute, with Samuel Wait as principal 
It was located in the Forest of Wake County, North Carolina, on the plantation of Dr. Calvin 
Jones, near which the Village of Wake Forest later developed. 

Rechartered in 1838 as Wake Forest College, it is one of the oldest institutions of higher 
learning in the state. It was exclusively a college of liberal arts for men until 1894. when the 
School of Law was established. The School of Medicine, founded in 1902, offered a 
two-year medical program until 1941 In that year the School was moved from the Town of 
Wake Forest to Winston-Salem, became associated with the North Carolina Baptist 
Hospital, and was renamed the Bowman Gray School of Medicine in honor of the 
benefactor who made possible the move and expansion to a full four-year program. In 
1942 Wake Forest admitted women as regular undergraduate students. 

A School of Business Administration was established in 1948 and for over two decades 
offered an undergraduate program of study in business. In 1969 the Babcock Graduate 
School of Management was formed and the professional program for undergraduates was 
phased out. In 1980 the undergraduate program in business and accountancy was 
reconstituted as the undergraduate School of Business and Accountancy. The Division of 
Graduate Studies was established in 1961. It is now organized as the Graduate School and 
encompasses advanced work in the arts and sciences on both the Reynolda and Haw- 
thorne Campuses in Winston-Salem. The summer session was inaugurated in 1921. 

In 1946 the Trustees of Wake Forest College and the Baptist State Convention of North 
Carolina accepted a proposal by the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation to relocate the ' 
non-medical divisions of the College in Winston-Salem, where the School of Medicine was ' 
already established. The late Charles H. Babcock and his wife, the late Mary Reynolds i 
Babcock, contributed a campus site, and building funds were received from many sources 
Between 1952 and 1956 the first fourteen buildings were erected in Georgian style on the j 
new Winston-Salem campus. In 1956 the College moved all operations, leaving the \ 
122-year-old campus in the Town of Wake Forest to the Southeastern Baptist Theological 
Seminary. 

The decade that followed was the College's most expansive, and in 1967 its augmented 
character was recognized by the change in name to Wake Forest University. Today 
enrollment in all schools of the University stands at over 4. 700. Governance remains in the 
hands of the Board of Trustees, and development for each of the five schools of the 
University is augmented by Boards of Visitors for the undergraduate schools and Graduate 
School, the School of Law. the Graduate School of Management, and the School of 
Medicine. A joint board of University Trustees and Trustees of the North Carolina Baptist 
Hospital is responsible for the Medical Center, which includes the hospital and the School 
of Medicine. Alumni and parents' organizations are also active at Wake Forest, and support 
by the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation and other foundations and corporations is strong and 
continuing. 



Wake Forest's relationship with the Baptist State Convention is an important part of the 
school's heritage. Wake Forest's founders proposed to establish an institution that would 
provide education under Christian influences. The basis for the continuing relationship 
between the University and the Convention is a mutually agreed-upon covenant which 
grows out of a commitment to God and to each other. The covenant expresses the 
Convention's deep interest in Christian higher education and the University's desire to 
serve the denomination as one of its constituencies. Wake Forest receives financial and 
intangible support from Convention-affiliated churches. 

The undergraduate schools, Graduate School. School of Law, and Graduate School of 
Management are located on the Reynolda Campus in northwest Winston-Salem. The 
Bowman Gray School of Medicine is about four miles away, near the city's downtown on 
what is known as the Hawthorne Campus. The University also offers instruction regularly at 
Casa Artom in Venice, at Worrell House in London, and in other places around the world. 

The undergraduate faculties offer courses of study leading to the baccalaureate in thirty 
departments and interdisciplinary areas. The School of Law offers the Juris Doctor and the 
Graduate School of Management the Master of Business Administration degree. In addi- 
tion to the Doctor of Medicine degree, the School of Medicine offers through the Graduate 
School programs leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in the 
basic medical sciences. The Graduate School confers the Master of Arts, Master of Arts in 
Education, and Master of Science degrees in the arts and sciences and the Doctor of 
Philosophy degree in biology and chemistry. 

Libraries 

The libraries of Wake Forest University support research in undergraduate education 
and in each of the disciplines in which a graduate degree is offered. An endowment 
provided by a substantial gift from the Mary Reynolds Babcock Foundation and another 
from Nancy Reynolds has been assigned to the sustained expansion and development of 
library resources, especially to support the graduate program. The libraries of the University 
hold membership in the Association of Southeastern Research Libraries. 

The library collections total 818,711 volumes. Of these, 624,367 constitute the general 
collection in the Z. Smith Reynolds Library, 83,112 are housed in the School of Law, 
98,761 in the library of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine, and 12,471 in a relatively 
new library in the Babcock Graduate School of Management. Subscriptions to 9,989 
periodicals and serials, largely of scholarly content, are maintained by the four libraries of 
the University. The holdings of the Z. Smith Reynolds Library also include 24,057 reels of 
microfilm, 265.303 pieces of microcards, microprint, and microfiche, and 77,045 volumes 
of United States government publications. 

Special collections cover the works of selected late nineteenth and early twentieth 
century English and American writers, with pertinent critical material, a Mark Twain 
Collection, a Gertrude Stein Collection, and the Ethel Taylor Crittenden Collection in 
Baptist History. The acquisition of the Charles H. Babcock Collection of Rare and Fine 
Books represents an important addition to the resources of the Z. Smith Reynolds Library. 

The library instructional program includes an orientation workshop in research methods, 
assistance in independent and directed studies, and bibliographic presentations as re- 
quested by faculty. 



Recognition and Accreditation 

Wake Forest University is a member of the Southern Association of Colleges and 
Schools, the Southern Universities Conference, the Association of American Colleges, the 
Conference of Southern Graduate Schools, and the Council of Graduate Schools in the 
United States. The University has chapters of the principal national social fraternities, 
professional fraternities, and honor societies, including Phi Beta Kappa and Sigma Xi. The 
Bowman Gray School of Medicine is a member of the Association of American Medical 
Colleges and is on the approved list of the Council on Medical Education of the American 
Medical Association. The program in counseling leading to the Master of Arts in Education 
degree is accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education. 

Wake Forest College was accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and 
Schools in 1921. The reaccreditation of 1965 included the master's and doctoral degree 
programs in the Division of Graduate Studies. Accreditation was reaffirmed in December 
1975. 




r !*5*l *!** 



Samuel Wait, a founder and the first president (1834—1845) 



The Summer Session 



The 1982 summer session offers two five-week terms, with the option of taking one or 
more courses for a maximum of eight credits per term. A maximum credit load in both 
terms is equivalent to a full semester's work. 

Most of the basic courses required for the bachelor's degree are offered, with a variety 
of advanced and elective graduate courses. Some special and unusual courses are 
designed to explore new avenues of learning beyond the traditional order. The course in 
Learning to Learn, available on campus on a non-credit basis, is a beginner's step in the 
approach to higher education. Regular college courses explore the Fundamentals of 
Human Motivation, deal with the mind in Altered States of Consciousness, and offer 
help through the study of Neuropsychology and Learning Disabilities. 

All of the basic science courses required for a bachelor's degree are available, and the 




mzFK : 



10 



mathematics curriculum includes courses in finite mathematics, calculus, probability, 
and computer programming. 

Courses in business and accountancy provide opportunities in three stages of 
accounting, beginning, intermediate, and cost accounting, as well as courses in financial 
management, quantitative methods, and the psychology of business and industry. 

In addition to an interdisciplinary course called American Foundations, the Depart- 
ment of History offers courses in American history. Civil War and Reconstruction, 
Western civilization, modern Europe, modern China, and that region of vital concern to 
all people in today's world, the Middle East. The Department of Politics supplements 
these offerings with a course which analyzes the American political system and another 
which compares the major political systems in the world today. 

Courses in English include surveys of British and American literature and a variety of 
advanced courses which range from a study of old English language from the time of 
Beowulf, through the Renaissance Era, and the seventeenth century, to a comparison 
of the fiction of Nathaniel Hawthorne and Henry James in the nineteenth century. 

In foreign languages, courses range from beginning, to intermediate, to advanced 
courses in both Spanish and French. Additional courses in translation are available in 
the literature of foreign countries, including courses in Greek literature, Romance 
literature, and German and Slavic literature. For students eager to acquire facility in 
spoken French, the summer session offers an opportunity to spend a month living with a 
French Swiss family in Switzerland. 

Advanced courses in anthropology and sociology include a field trip to Honduras, and 
an archeological excavation of a prehistoric site in Yadkin County. North Carolina. On 
campus, there are courses in marriage and the family, photography in the social 
sciences, and a study of criminology in American society. 

For students interested in religion and philosophy, there are basic courses in each, and 
in religion there are two opportunities for study abroad. One is an archeological field trip 
to excavate a site in Caesarea, and the other is a tour of the Mediterranean World with a 
focus on the Holy Lands of the Middle East. 

On the graduate level, courses are offered leading to the Master of Arts degree in 
education, English, history, physical education, psychology, and speech communica- 
tion. In education particularly there is a spectrum of graduate courses for teachers 
interested in beginning or continuing work on the Master of Arts in Education degree. 
Fields of specialization are counseling and psychometry. as well as the major teaching 
areas. 

There is a variety of special programs for teachers and graduate students. The 
Department of History is continuing its special summer interdisciplinary program, 
American Foundations, for graduates and public school teachers in the fields of history, 
art, literature, and music. American Foundations is co-sponsored with Reynolda House 
and includes visits to local historic sites as well as a week's trip to New York. The 
Department of Education is offering two special terms for teachers with courses focusing 
on teaching gifted children. All of the field trips in anthropology and religion may be 
pursued on the graduate level. The Department of Physical Education is continuing its 
special graduate program in the summer which offers training in the field of biomechan- 
ics and graded exercise testing, as well as a workshop offered in the summer by the 
American College of Sports Medicine. 



11 



High school students can find opportunities in the summer session of 1982 in the 
Learning to Learn Program, the Debate Workshop, American Legion Boys' State, the 
Order of the Arrow, the Sports Camp, and the basketball, golf, soccer, tennis, and 
cheerleaders camps. 

The 1982 summer session is designed to meet the needs of the following: 

Undergraduates in the University who want to accelerate their education and to 
obtain the bachelor's degree in less than four years. 

Incoming freshmen who plan to complete requirements for the bachelor's degree in 
less than four years or who want to gain experience before beginning a full academic 
program in the fall semester. 

Undergraduate students from other colleges and universities who wish to attend the 
summer session only and need to take particular courses. 

Public school teachers and administrators who need courses leading to the issuance 
or renewal of certificates, or who wish to begin a program of graduate study leading to 
the Master of Arts in Education degree. 

Students with the bachelor's degree who desire to begin work on a master's degree in 
biology, chemistry, education, English, history, mathematics, physical education, phys- 
ics, psychology, religion, or speech communication and theatre arts. 

The summer session is an integral part of the school year, and the various facilities of 
the University are available then as in the fall and spring. The continuation of high 
standards of academic work is assured by the fact that, with few exceptions, instructors 
are selected from the professorial ranks of the regular faculty. 




The James R. Scales Fine Arts Center 



12 

Procedures 



All students are responsible for familiarizing themselves with academic, housing, 
traffic, and other regulations. Students are expected to abide by these regulations while 
enrolled at the University. 

Undergraduate Admission 

Admission to the summer session does not constitute admission to the fall or spring 
semester. 

Students who plan to attend the University in the summer session only should use the 
summer session application form provided by the Dean of the Summer Session. 
Students who come under this classification are (1) temporary visiting students from 
other colleges or universities, who must present a written statement that they are 
currently in satisfactory academic and social standing at their college or university and 
have permission to take courses at Wake Forest in the summer session as indicated on 
the application form; (2) teachers desiring courses leading to issuance or renewal of the 
A or G public school certificates; (3) high school graduates who plan to enroll in another 
college or university in the fall semester, and who must present a written statement of 
graduation from their respective high schools or have approval to attend the University 
summer session from the dean or registrar of the college or university at which they have 
been accepted for the fall semester. 

Students who plan to begin in the summer session and continue at the University in 
the fall semester should apply for admission to the Director of Admissions, indicating on 
their application the intention to attend both the summer session and the fall semester. 
Students who come under this classification are (1) incoming freshmen and (2) perma- 
nent transfer students from other colleges and universities. 

Students who have attended the University but who are not now in residence must 
apply for readmission to the Director of Admissions before they can enroll for the 
summer session. 

Students who are attending the University in the spring semester and who plan to 
attend the summer session should indicate their intention by signing and returning the 
summer session reservation card mailed to their home address in April, or they should 
sign a card in the Registrar's Office. 110 Reynolda Hall. 

Graduate Admission 

Students who begin in the summer session programs of study leading to the Master of 
Arts, Master of Science, Master of Arts in Education, or Doctor of Philosophy degree 
must be admitted to the Graduate School according to the procedures of the bulletin of 
the Graduate School. Bulletins and application forms are available from the Dean of the 
Graduate School. 

Students who are currently enrolled and who plan to attend the summer session 
should make arrangements in the Office of the Dean of the Graduate School. 

Students who plan to apply for one of twenty tuition scholarships available in the 
summer session should make arrangements in the Office of the Dean of the Graduate 
School. 



13 



Students who do not plan to pursue programs of study leading to the master's degree 
and students who already hold a graduate degree may be admitted to the summer 
session as unclassified graduate students and may take courses for which they meet 
prerequisites at the 300 and 400 levels. Unclassified graduate students are not regarded 
as candidates for degrees. Subject to approval of the department concerned, courses 
completed by unclassified students may be applied toward the master's degree if the 
student is subsequently accepted as a candidate for a master's degree. Unclassified 
graduate students must (1) complete the application for admission, health form, and 
demographic form provided by the Dean of the Summer Session, (2) present a letter of 
recommendation, and (3) present an official transcript of undergraduate work from the 
college or university from which they graduated. Unclassified graduate students should 
make arrangements in the Office of the Dean of the Summer Session. 

Students who plan to participate in the American Foundations Program at Reynolda 
House as unclassified graduate students seeking graduate credit must (1) complete the 
special application form, (2) present two letters of recommendation, and (3) present an 
official transcript of undergraduate work from the college or university from which they 
graduated. 



Health Certification 

All students who attend the summer session or special summer programs must 
complete the health form for the University Health Service. Residents of Winston-Salem 
who have their own physician must complete only the medical history section of the 
form. Immunization information is not required, but all health forms must be signed 
authorizing treatment in case of emergency. 



Admission of Handicapped Students 

Wake Forest University will consider the application of any student on the basis of his 
or her academic and personal merit, regardless of physical handicap. Though the 
campus is built on many levels, a system of ramps and elevators makes each building 
accessible to those in wheelchairs or with limited mobility. The University will gladly 
assist handicapped students in making arrangements to meet special needs. Students 
who seek further information should consult the Dean of the Summer Session or the 
University's Office of Equal Opportunity. 



Room Charges 

Double room (each person) per five-week term $130.00 

Room charges must be paid in full for the entire term at the time of registration. A 

residence hall key deposit of $5.00 is required of all residential students. This deposit 

should be paid at check-in. 



14 



Tuition and Fees 

Full-Time 
Students 



Part-Time 
Students 



Undergraduate 

Tuition 

Audit Fee 
Graduate 

Tuition 

Audit Fee 
Vehicle Registration Fee 

Automobile 

Motorcycle, etc. 



$52.50 per credit 
$30.00 per course 

$60.00 per hour 
$30.00 per course 

$ 6.00 per term 
$ 2.00 per term 



$52.50 per credit 
$30.00 per course 

$60.00 per hour 
$30.00 per course 

$ 6.00 per term 
$ 2.00 per term 



Each student driving an automobile or other propelled vehicle to the campus is 
required to register it at the University Department of Public Safety on the same day the 
student registers for courses. Automobile and motorcycle registration fees are not 
refundable. 

All tuition and fees are due and payable in advance from currently enrolled University 
students. Students from other colleges and universities may pay tuition and room rent at 
registration. Meals from the University food service average $35.00 - $45.00 per week. 

Withdrawal and Refund Policy 

During the summer session all students may receive tuition refunds according to the 
following schedule. This policy applies to students dropping individual courses as well as 
to those withdrawing from the summer session. 



First Session 


Second Session 


Tuition 


Housing 


Friday May 28 


Monday July 5 


1 00% 


All except $10 


Saturday May 29 


Tuesday July 6 


75% 


75% 


Monday May 31 


Wednesday July 7 


50% 


50% 


Tuesday June 1 


Thursday July 8 


25% 


25% 



After June 1 for the first session and July 8 for the second session, no refund will be 
made. 



Financial Aid 

Because summer session tuition charges are reduced for all students to less than 
one-half the amount charged for tuition in the regular academic year, it is not possible to 
provide additional scholarships for a large number of students. However, a limited 
number of partial scholarships are available to in-service public or private school 



15 



teachers enrolling for undergraduate credit. Letters of application should be addressed 
to the Dean of the Summer Session. 



Employment Opportunities 

Opportunities for student employment in the summer session are limited to a few 
positions in the library and the cafeteria. These are frequently preempted by regular 
students who plan to attend the summer session and make arrangements in advance for 
employment. The academic program is accelerated in the summer, and students should 
not seek outside employment unless necessary. Students desiring part-time employ- 
ment should consult the Office of Educational Planning and Placement. 



Veteran Benefits 

The University has enrolled a number of students who are veterans. Students who 
need information concerning education benefits for veterans should consult the 
Treasurer or the nearest regional office of the Veterans Administration. The office for 
North Carolina is located in the Federal Building at 251 North Main Street in downtown 
Winston-Salem. 



Housing Services and Regulations 

Mary Reynolds Babcock Dormitory is an air conditioned residence hall which is used 
during the summer session. All registered undergraduate students, including 
freshmen — who are required to live on campus — are accommodated here. By 
accepting a room assignment, students agree to abide by the room contract and by the 
regulations stipulated in this bulletin and in the constitution of the student body. Local 
students or freshmen with approval from the Dean of the Summer Session may live off 
campus. 

Check-in at Babcock is Tuesday, May 25 for the first session and Wednesday, June 30 
for the second session between 12:00 noon and 5:00 p.m. A $25.00 refundable 
key/damage deposit is required at that time. 

Room assignments are made by the Summer Resident Director on a first come first 
served basis. All double rooms are assigned to two students, beginning with the lower 
floors. Students desiring to room together must check in together. There are a limited 
number of single rooms which are assigned at the discretion of the Summer Resident 
Director. 

Room changes and reassignment are allowed during the first two days of the session, 
but only with the prior written approval of the Summer Resident Director. The Director 
reserves the right to reassign students for disciplinary reasons or to ensure double 
occupancy and the efficient use of residence hall space. Students remaining for the 
second session must indicate this intent at check-in and confirm their plans prior to the 
end of the first session. 

Check-out is required regardless of when a student leaves the session. It includes the 
following: (a) removal of all personal property, (b) deposit of refuse in the appropriate 



16 



containers in hallways, (c) completion of the room condition report, (d) closing and 
locking all windows and doors, and (e) return of the room key to a staff member. THERE 
IS A $25.00 FINE FOR FAILURE TO COMPLETE THE CHECKOUT PROCEDURE, 
which must be completed by 6:00 p.m. the last day of the session. 

Babcock facilities include lounges, a study area, a kitchen, storage areas, and laundry 
facilities. They are provided for the exclusive use of Babcock residents. A guest policy is 
outlined at check-in and during a residence hall meeting the first full day of each session. 

Furnishings and equipment axe not to be moved from rooms and are not be be used 
for other than their intended purpose. 

The rooms are furnished with single beds, desks, chairs, dressers, and closets. 
Students must supply their own linen, pillows, desk lamps, and wastebaskets. Molding is 
provided on the walls for hanging pictures, pennants, and posters, which are not to be 
affixed to the walls or ceilings. 

Curtains or drapes must be suspended by temporary spring-type rods with cushioned 
ends. Window screens must be left on the windows, and trunks or heavy luggage must 
be stored in trunk rooms. Waterbeds are not allowed. The University accepts no 
responsibility for students' personal property. 

Babcock is a coeducational residence hall with separate wings for men and women. 
Students are not allowed in the rooms assigned to members of the opposite sex except 
during hours approved by the Summer Resident Director in accordance with estab- 
lished guidelines. 

After the residence hall is closed for the night, students must enter by the center front 
door, where proper identification must be shown to the guard on duty. Students who are 
involved in incidents which jeopardize the safety or security or well being of the students 
living in the residence hall or other University property forfeit the opportunity to 
continue living in the residence hall, lose all fees, and become subject to disciplinary 
action. 

Students are expected to cooperate with campus guards and residence hall staff 
members by providing proper identification upon request. Failure to do so is considered 
serious misconduct. 

In order to provide an opportunity for responsible living and learning in a safe and 
comfortable environment, the following regulations have been adopted: 

( 1 ) Cooking and ironing are not permitted in rooms and must be done in the kitchen 
or laundry. 

(2) Electrical appliances, other than thermostatically controlled coffee pots and small 
refrigerators (1.5 amp., five cubic feet maximum) are not allowed. 

(3) Musical appliances and hair dryers are authorized, but if it becomes apparent that 
electrical circuits are overloaded, remedial measures — including limitation of electrical 
service — must be taken. 

(4) Indecent exposure, illicit sexual activity, and public use of vulgar or abusive 
language are prohibited. 

(5) Students are subject to all state and local regulations concerning the use of 
alcoholic beverages. Public consumption or display of alcoholic liquors, wines, or beer 
in the residence hall or elsewhere on campus is prohibited. 

(6) Alcohol abuse, including intoxication, is not tolerated. Behavior resulting from 
such abuse results in loss of housing privileges and disciplinary action. 



17 



(7) Possession or use of illegal drugs (LSD and marijuana, for example), and drug 
paraphernalia is prohibited. Students involved in the use, possession, distribution, or 
transportation of illegal drugs or contraband on or off campus must vacate the residence 
hall within forty-eight hours and are subject to disciplinary action, which may include 
dismissal from the University. Parents of such students are notified promptly. 

(8) Deadly weapons are prohibited everywhere on campus except in the Department 
of Military Science and as authorized by the University Department of Public Safety. 

(9) Animals are not allowed in the residence halls. 

(10) Use or possession of fireworks and other pyrotechnics is prohibited in the 
residence halls and elsewhere on campus. 

(11) Playing sports in the residence hall areas is prohibited. Ample playing fields are 
provided close to the residence halls. 

(12) Rooms in the residence halls cannot be used as sales offices or storerooms or for 
solicitation of sales or gifts without prior written permission of the Dean of Men. 

(13) No aerials of any kind may be installed on any University building (including 
window sills) without prior written permission of the Director of the Physical Plant. 

(14) Students are expected to refrain from making excessive noise either in person or 
with sound equipment such as musical instruments or stereos. 

Failure to comply with these regulations or the instructions of the Summer Resident 
Director can result in forfeiture of housing privileges and fees. Students removed from 
the residence halls relinquish all rights to further use of the facilities regardless of rental 
fees which may have been paid. 

Any questions regarding these regulations or summer housing in general should be 
addressed to the Director of Housing, 7342 Reynolda Station, Winston-Salem, N.C. 
27109. 

Student Services 

Food Services. A cafeteria and a soda shop are located in Reynolda Hall, serving 
meals during the day and snacks at night. 

Laundry Service. Laundry is arranged for privately. Coin-operated washers and 
dryers are located in residence halls and are not available to non-resident students. 

Health Service. The Health Service is located in Kitchin House for students who 
become ill. The Center for Psychological Services assists students with personal adjust- 
ment problems. 

Educational Planning and Placement. Students seeking part-time summer employ- 
ment should consult the Office for Educational Planning and Placement. Both this office 
and the Center for Psychological Services assist students with educational and vocation- 
al problems. Persons planning to find employment upon their graduation at the end of 
the summer session should register early with this office. 

Recreational Activities. The University maintains athletic fields, tennis courts, and 
athletic, physical education, and recreation facilities which include a swimming pool, 
handball and squash courts, basketball floors, a dance studio, recreational areas, and 
gymnastics and wrestling rooms. The Department of Physical Education sponsors an 
intramural program of tournaments and organized club activities in tennis, golf, racquet- 
ball, and other sports for men and women. Student golfers may take advantage of two 



18 



public courses. Winston Lake and Reynolds Park. Other golf courses are available at 
Grandview. Wedgewood. Wilshire. Tanglewood Park, and Hillcrest Golf Clubs. Stu- 
dents can find swimming, golf, horseback riding, fishing, picnicking, and games at 
Tanglewood Park. 

Historic Old Salem, the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts, the Wachovia 
Historical Society Museum, the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art. Reynolda 
House, the Museum of Man. the Nature Science Center, numerous industries, and the 
nearby mountains are of interest to those who attend the summer session. Pilot Moun- 
tain and Hanging Rock state parks are approximately thirty miles north of Winston- 
Salem. Blowing Rock on the Blue Ridge Parkway, about a two-hour drive, is a well 
known summer resort and features a variety of summer recreational activities. 

Free movies are shown regularly during the summer session. 

Religious Activities. Religious programs supplement the summer schedule. The Office 
of the Chaplain welcomes the opportunity to identify churches in the community and 
give any help it can to summer session students. Wake Forest Baptist Church holds 
worship services each Sunday at 11:00 a.m. in Wait Chapel. A special series of worship 
services is scheduled each evening during the Ministers' Conference. July 12-16. in 
Davis Chapel. Students and faculty are invited to attend. 



Vehicle Regulations 

Automobiles must be registered with the University Department of Public Safety on 
the same day that the student registers for courses. Registration is not considered 
complete until the automobile is also registered, for students in residence on the campus 
and for those who commute by automobile to the campus. A $6.00 non-refundable 
registration fee is charged for automobiles each term, and there is a $2.00 fee for 
motorcycles and other two-wheeled vehicles, which must also be registered. If the 
student registers for courses and later decides to bring an automobile on the campus, the 
automobile must be registered on the same day that it is brought on the campus. 

Students are required to establish ownership by presenting state registration, title, bill 
of sale, or state inspection worksheet. Students are responsible for knowing and com- 
plying with campus traffic and parking regulations at all times. Violators are fined, and all 
fines must be paid within fourteen days of receipt of ticket. After this time, if the fine is not 
paid the car is considered in violation of University policy, is banned from the campus, 
and may be towed away at the student's expense. More specific details concerning 
possession, registration, and parking of automobiles, including a map indicating 
appropriate parking locations, is given each student at the time of registration. 



Undergraduate Registration 

Registration for the first term begins in the Registrar's Office. 110 Reynolda Hall, at 
9:00 a.m. on Wednesday. May 26. and closes at 12:00 noon. Registration for the second 
term begins in the Registrar's Office at 9:00 a.m. on Thursday. July 1. and closes at 
12:00 noon. No student is allowed to register after the fifth day of either term. 



19 



Graduate Registration 

Graduate students working toward a degree and unclassified graduate students taking 
regular courses offered in the summer session register for the first five-week term on 
May 26 in the Office of the Dean of the Graduate School, 210 Reynolda Hall, between 
the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 12:00 noon. Registration for the second five-week term is on 
July 1 from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon in the Graduate School office. Unclassified 
graduate students in the American Foundations Program or other special programs 
register at special times according to instructions from the director of the program. 

Undergraduate Class Regulations 

Opening of Classes. All classes in the first five-week term begin at 1:00 p.m. on 
Wednesday, May 26. Science classes in the first five-week term meet for the first time at 
1:00 p.m. on May 26 and thereafter at the regularly scheduled time of 8:00 a.m. to 
1:00 p.m. 

In the second five-week term, classes begin at 1:00 p.m. on Thursday, July 1, Science 
classes in the second five-week term meet for the first time at 1:00 p.m. on July 1 and 
thereafter at the regularly scheduled time of 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. 

Course Changes. After registration, necessary course changes must be made im- 
mediately in the Registrar's Office and not later than the fifth day in each term. 

Dropping a Course. The last day for dropping a class without penalty is June 1 in the 
first term and July 8 in the second term. Any course dropped before this date must be 
approved by the Registrar; after this date the drop must be approved by the Dean of the 
Summer Session. Except in cases of emergency, the grade in the course is usually 
recorded as F. If at any time a student drops any course without prior written approval of 
the Dean, a grade of F for that course is reported by the instructor to the Registrar. 

Attendance. Attendance regulations specifically place the responsibility for class 
attendance upon the individual student. He or she is expected to attend classes regularly 
and punctually. A student should recognize that one of the most vital aspects of a 
residential college experience is attendance in the classroom and that the value of this 
academic experience cannot fully be measured by tests alone. 

Students are considered sufficiently mature to appreciate the necessity of regular 
attendance, to accept this personal responsibility, to demonstrate the kind of self- 
discipline essential for such performance, and to recognize and accept the consequences 
of failure to attend. An instructor may refer to the Office of the Dean of the College for 
suitable action students who in his or her opinion are causing their work or that of the 
class to suffer because of absence or lateness. Any student who does not attend classes 
regularly, or who demonstrates other evidence of academic irresponsibility, is subject to 
such disciplinary action as the Committee on Academic Affairs may prescribe, including 
immediate suspension. 

The Office of the Dean of the College maintains a list of students who have been 
absent from class because of illness certified by the Health Service or for other extenuat- 
ing circumstances. Such absences are considered excused and a record of them is 
available to instructors. An instructor determines whether work the student has missed, 
including examinations, may be made up. 



20 



Withdrawal from the University. A student who finds it necessary to withdraw must file 
an application with the Dean of the Summer Session. Before withdrawal in good 
standing may be recorded, the application must be endorsed by the Director of Housing, 
the Treasurer, and the Registrar and must be approved by the Dean of the Summer 
Session. If a student leaves the College without officially withdrawing, he or she is 
assigned failing grades in all current courses and unofficial withdrawal is indicated on the 
record. 

Auditing of Classes. A student enrolled in a full-time program may audit classes 
without charge with the permission of the instructor. With the permission of the Dean of 
the Summer Session and the instructor, others may audit classes at a charge of $30.00 
per course. An auditor is listed on the class roll as such and is subject to the usual 
attendance regulations and to whatever additional requirements the instructor may 
impose. If these conditions are properly fulfilled, a notation "audit" is entered in lieu of a 
grade on the final grade report. For the regularly enrolled student, this notation is also 
entered on the permanent record. An auditor may receive no grade or credit for the 
course. An audit course may not be changed to a credit course and a credit course may 
not be changed to an audit course. 

Grading 

For all courses carrying undergraduate credit there are six grades: A (exceptionally 
high achievement), B (superior). C (satisfactory). D (passing but unsatisfactory), E 
(conditional failure), and F (failure). An A has the grade point value of four for each 
credit involved, a B the value of three, a C the value of two. and a D the value of one. 

For all courses carrying graduate credit there are three passing grades — A (excel- 
lent). B (good), and C (low pass) — and one failing grade — F. An A has the grade point 
value of three for each semester hour of credit involved, a B the value of two. and a C the 
value of one. 

Credits. Undergraduate courses carry four credits each unless otherwise stated. Two 
courses for a total of eight credits constitute a normal load in each five-week term. 
Teachers and public school administrators enrolled in the Graduate School and seeking 
renewal of the public school certificate may obtain six semester hours credit by taking 
two courses in either term. Those with problems should consult the Director of Under- 
graduate Teacher Education. 

Grade Reports and Transcripts. Students receive a report which indicates courses 
taken and grades received. Those who would like a transcript of summer session courses 
sent to another college or university or to the Department of Public Instruction of North 
Carolina should request one from the Registrar's Office. 

Honor System 

The honor system is an expression of the concern that students be motivated by 
ideals of honor and integrity. It is an integral part of the student government of the 
College as adopted by students and approved by the faculty. Its essence is that each 
student's word can be trusted implicitly and that any violation of a student's word is an 
offense against the whole student community. The honor system binds students neither 



21 



to give nor receive aid on any examination, quiz, or other pledge work; to have complete 
respect for the property rights of others; not to make false or deceiving statements 
regarding academic matters to another member of the University community, not to 
give false testimony or refuse to pay just debts; and to confront any student who has 
violated the honor system and tell him or her that it is his or her responsibility to report 
himself or herself or face the possibility of being reported to the Honor Council. 




22 

Special Programs 

Master of Arts in Education 

The Department of Education offers the Master of Arts in Education degree in the 
certificate areas of school counseling and School Psychologist II — Psychometrist; in 
the graduate secondary teaching certificate areas of biology, chemistry. English, history, 
mathematics, physical education, physics, and speech; and in all elementary certificate 
teaching areas. These programs have been approved by the Board of Education of 
North Carolina as meeting state certificate requirements. The program in counseling 
leading to the Master of Arts in Education degree is accredited by the National Council 
for the Accreditation of Teacher Education. The Department also offers Master of Arts in 
Education programs in general counseling and in Foundations of Education. 

A number of assistantships, fellowships, and scholarships are available for qualified 
teachers who wish to enroll as regular students in the term beginning in September 
1982. Assistantships, valued at $8,450, require twelve to fifteen hours per week service 
in the Department of Education. Fellowships are valued at $6,100. Scholarships cover 
the cost of tuition. Applications for financial assistance should be submitted before 
March 1. 

For teachers who cannot attend during the academic year, the residence and course 
requirements for the Masters of Arts in Education degree can be completed principally in 
summer sessions. (For degree requirements and courses offered during the summer of 
1982. consult other sections of this bulletin.) Applications for summer scholarships are 
accepted until April 15. 

A graduate bulletin and forms on which to apply for admission and financial assistance 
can be obtained from the Office of the Dean of the Graduate School. 

Special Programs for Teachers on Teaching the Gifted 

The Department of Education offers two special terms for public school teachers 
during the summer, focusing on the area of teaching gifted children. The first session is 
from June 21-July 17 and the second session from July 19-August 14. For details on 
course offerings and class meetings, see the curriculum section of this bulletin. Persons 
desiring additional information should write Joseph Milner. Chairman of the Depart- 
ment of Education, 7266 Reynolda Station, Winston-Salem. North Carolina 27109. or 
telephone (919) 761-5341. 

American Foundations Program in History 

The University and Reynolda House, a museum of American art near the Reynolda 
Campus, have combined resources to offer a program for graduate and undergraduate 
students and teachers of history, art, literature, and music, to be held for the fifteenth 
consecutive summer at Reynolda House, June 21-July 30. 

Nature and Purpose. The approach is interdisciplinary. Using the American art 
collection, architecture, literature, music, and the decorative arts, it focuses on the 
nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The course is designed to be a stimulating experi- 
ence for people who are teaching or who plan to teach in the future, as well as for 



23 



students of history, art, literature, and music. From 9:00 to 3:00 daily, students are 
involved in lectures, reading, reflecting, discussion, writing, and individual experiences 
such as stone sculpturing and painting, A one-week trip to New York enables students to 
visit places of historic, artistic, and literary interest for a comparison with and expansion 
upon local collections. 

Scholarships. In-service public school teachers in North Carolina are encouraged to 
apply for tuition grants directly to the State Department of Education, Division of Staff 
Development, Raleigh, North Carolina 27611. The University provides students not 
otherwise provided for with an educational scholarship amounting to one half the 
regular summer session tuition. A grant from Reynolda House makes it possible for each 
student to receive partial coverage of tours and special activities. 

This year for the first time six full scholarships including travel allotment to and from 
Winston-Salem will be given: three to students of academic merit and three to teachers 
with ten years' experience and superior letters of recommendation from their immediate 
superiors. 

Credit. The course provides six semester hours of credit which can be used toward a 
master's degree in history or for certificate renewal. Credit is issued by the University, 
and the course is listed as History 463-464, American Foundations. 

Faculty and Administration. Conducting the course are Cyclone Covey, professor of 
history at the University; Barbara Babcock Millhouse. American art lecturer and presi- 
dent of Reynolda House; Doyle Fosso, professor of English at the University; Nicholas 
B. Bragg, director of Reynolda House and program coordinator; and other faculty 
members from the University. 

Qualifications for Applicants. The program is designed primarily for students and 
teachers, especially those interested in American history, literature, art, and music. 
Teachers qualify who hold the B.A. degree and are seeking certificate renewal or who 
are working toward the MA. degree. The class is limited to twenty-five students, not 
more than five of whom may be recent college graduates or undergraduates. The 
application deadline is May 31. Classes begin on Monday, June 21. Inquiries should be 
addressed to the Dean of the Summer Session, 7293 Reynolda Station, Winston- 
Salem, North Carolina 27109. 



Swiss French Civilization 

The Department of Romance Languages sponsors a four-week visit to Switzerland to 
study Swiss French civilization and the French language from May 13 to June 10. Living 
arrangements are made through the Experiment in International Living. All students live 
in the same town, each with a Swiss family. Visits are made individually with the family or 
in groups to other locations such as Geneva, Lausanne, Berne, Fribourg, the Chateau 
de Chillon, and to the mountains, glaciers, and lakes of Switzerland. Each student must 
agree in advance to participate in group activities; some proficiency in conversational 
French is recommended. A journal and a paper, both in French, describing in detail 
some aspect of Swiss French civilization are required of each student. 

Interested students should consult John E. Parker Jr., Professor of Romance Lan- 
guages, 7566 Reynolda Station, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109. 



24 



European Geography Study Tour 

A guided tour of Western Europe to study its physical, economic, social, and cultural 
environments will be offered during the first term of the summer session (May 24— June 
19, approximate dates). Cities visited include London, Amsterdam. Heidelberg, 
Munich, Vienna, Venice, Rome, Florence, and Paris. A day will be spent in the Swiss 
Alps. An orientation on slides and motion pictures will be provided before the tour. The 
course, Education 272. will provide four credits and may be taken on a pass-fail basis, or 
for a letter grade. P — permission of instructor. For additional information write to 
Herman J. Preseren, Professor of Education. 7266 Reynolda Station, Winston-Salem, 
North Carolina 27109. 

Seminar in the Mediterranean World and Holy Land Tour 

The Department of Religion will sponsor a Seminar in the Mediterranean World and a 
Holy Land Tour, June 6-16, 1982. The tour will focus on the Bible Lands of Jordan and 
Israel, and will be led by Charles H. Talbert, Professor of Religion. The tour may be 
taken on an audit basis or students seeking credit may register for Religion 218, Seminar 
in the Mediterranean World and receive four credits. Inquiries should be directed to 
Charles H. Talbert, Box 7212. Reynolda Station, Winston-Salem. North Carolina 
27109. 

Interdisciplinary Overseas Research Program 

The Overseas Research Center conducts its fifteenth field project in Central America 
June 14— July 5. Research will focus on a continuing study and documentation of 
sociocultural change in general and nutrition and health in particular. The research site 
will be on the Limon Coast of Costa Rica south of Puerto Viejo. The center offers an 
interdisciplinary program and is open to any student interested in problems facing 
developing nations. Incoming Freshmen are invited to participate. All applications 
should be received by mid-April. 

For additional information contact David K. Evans, Associate Professor of Anthropol- 
ogy, 7808 Reynolda Station, Winston-Salem. North Carolina 27109. Telephone (919) 
761-5495 or 761-0187. 

Archeological Field School in Yadkin County, North Carolina 

The Department of Anthropology at Wake Forest University will offer an archeologi- 
cal field school between the dates of July 5 and August 13. 1982. The school will be 
conducted on the late prehistoric site of Donnaha in Yadkin County. North Carolina. 
The work will involve the excavation of prehistoric remains using standard methods of 
archeological recovery. In addition to the five day work week, some week-end trips to 
local archeological sites of interest are planned. 

The student will receive eight credits in Anthropology 381 and 382 for the six weeks 
work at Donnaha. For more information write J. Ned Woodall. 7808 Reynolda Station, 
Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109, or telephone (919) 761-5495. 



25 



Archeological Field School in Caesarea 

The Department of Religion of Wake Forest University will participate in the excava- 
tion at Caesarea, Israel, July 1-August 3, 1982. Credit for Religion 315 and 316 is 
optional. Students interested in this program should consult E. W. Hamrick, Department 
of Religion, or telephone (919) 761-5462. 

American College of Sports Medicine Workshops 

The American College of Sports Medicine will sponsor a preventive/rehabilitative 
exercise technologist workshop and an exercise test technologist certification session 
during the first term of the 1982 summer session. The workshop is June 14—23 and the 
certification session is June 24—25. 

Inquiries should be addressed to Paul M. Ribisl, Director of American College of 
Sports Medicine Workshop, 7234 Reynolda Station, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 
27109. 

Marching Band Workshop 

A special workshop in corps style marching band techniques, sponsored by Duncan 
Music Company and the Demon Deacons Marching Band, will be offered June 18-19, 
1982. 

One unit of renewal credit will be offered to music educators. Inquiries should be 
addressed to Davidson Burgess, Director of Bands, 7345 Reynolda Station, Winston- 
Salem, North Carolina 27109. 

Debate Workshops for High School Students and Coaches 

The University invites superior high school students with an interest in forensics to 
participate in a debate workshop to be held on campus June 28-July 1 8. Students live in 
University residence halls under the supervision of the workshop staff. Nationally 
recognized authorities in debate theory serve in the distinguished lecturer series; an 
instructional staff from throughout the country works individually with students. The 
recreational facilities of the University are available for all participants. Students who 
have completed the ninth grade may apply. 

A coaches' workshop will be held June 28^July 3. Graduate credit will be available to 
participants. 

Interested students and teachers should consult Allan D. Louden, Department of 
Speech Communication and Theatre Arts, 7347 Reynolda Station, Winston-Salem, 
North Carolina 27109. 

Boys' State Program in Citizenship 
For High School Students 

In cooperation with the American Legion, the University sponsors North Carolina 
Boys' State, a program to provide training in American government and citizenship. 

The program begins on June 13 and extends through June 19. Approximately 475 
boys attend. Applicants must have a B average and must have given evidence of 



26 

leadership in high school. Participants have all expenses paid and are selected by the 
American Legion in conjunction with local high school officials. 

Inquiries should be addressed to the Adjutant of the North Carolina Department of the 
American Legion, Box 26657. Raleigh. North Carolina 27611. or to Jack D. Fleer. 
Professor of Politics, 7568 Reynolda Station. Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109. 

Wake Forest University Cheerleaders Camp 

The Second Wake Forest Cheerleaders Camp will offer two one-week (Sunday- 
Thursday) sessions, July 11-15 and July 18-22. Camps are limited to 200 participants 
each week. The camp is open to students eight years of age through senior high school. 
All of the staff are or have been varsity cheerleaders at Wake Forest University or 
another ACC school, and have taught at one of the national cheerleading camps. For 
additional information, write Anne Bingham. Director. Cheerleaders Camp, 7265 
Reynolda Station, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109, or telephone (919) 761- 
5626. 

Summer Golf Program 

The Jesse Haddock Summer Golf Program, first offered in 1979, is available again 
this year. The program is under the supervision of Coach Jesse Haddock, and members 
of the Wake Forest University golf team will be counselors. Golfers are divided into small 
groups according to age and ability. Off- and on-the-course instruction includes lectures, 
exhibitions, films, and games. Golf courses at Bermuda Run Country Club, home of the 
Wake Forest golf team, and at Tanglewood, site of the 1974 PGA Championship, will 
be the scene of play. 

Four sessions are available in 1982: first session. June 13-June 26; second session, 
July 5-17; Super Session I. June 13-July 3; Super Session II, July 5-July 24. The Super 
Sessions will include a more concentrated exposure to members of the PGA Tour and a 
trip to Pinehurst. North Carolina, "the golf capital of the world." Also for 1982, campers 
may attend any single week during the first and second sessions. Participants must be 
eighteen years of age or younger. Enrollment is limited. For additional information, write 
Jesse Haddock, Inc.. Wake Forest University, 6696 Reynolda Station, Winston-Salem, 
North Carolina 27109 or call (919) 761-5619. 

Basketball Camp 

The University basketball coaching staff conducts a basketball camp for young people 
age nine to eighteen. The camp includes three sessions, the first. July 11-16; the 
second. July 18-23; and the third session, July 25-30. Enrollment in each is limited. 
Head Coach Carl Tacy and Assistant Coaches Mark Freidinger. Ernie Nestor, and Herb 
Cline are in charge and in attendance at every session. The coaches are assisted by 
outstanding professionals and college players. Campers live in residence halls on the 
campus and meals are provided in the University cafeteria. Instruction is given on the 
four gymnasium courts. Inquiries should be addressed to 7506 Reynolda Station. 
Winston-Salem. North Carolina 27109. 



27 



Sports Camp 

The Department of Physical Education will sponsor a Sports Camp for boys and girls 
eight through fifteen. The camp, in its twenty-second year, meets Monday-Friday 
mornings from 8:30 until 12: 15. Two sessions of the camp are scheduled: June 21-July 
2 and July 5-16. Leo Ellison, Professor of Physical Education, serves as director of the 
Sports Camp and is assisted by other members of the faculty. Instruction is given in a 
wide variety of sports. Inquiries should be addressed to the Department of Physical 
Education, 7234 Reynolda Station, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109. 




28 



Undergraduate Registration 

First Term 

Wednesday, May 26, in 1 10 Reynolda Hall beginning at 9:00, alphabetically by surname 
according to the following schedule: 



9:00- 9:30 A-E 
9:30-10:00 F-K 



10:00-10:30 L-Q 
10:30-11:00 R-Z 



Second Term 

Thursday, July 1, in 110 Reynolda Hall beginning at 9:00, alphabetically by surname 
according to the following schedule: 



9:00- 9:30 M-R 
9:30-10:00 S-Z 



10:00-10:30 A-E 
10:30-11:00 G-L 



Graduate Registration 

Registration for graduate students for the first term is in 210 Reynolda Hall, on Wednes- 
day, May 26, from 9:00-12:00. 

Registration for graduate students for the second term is in 210 Reynolda Hall, on 
Thursday, July 1, from 9:00-12:00. 





Classes and Examinations 










First Term 








First Meeting 


Regular Daily 






Class Period 


May 26 


Schedule 


Examinations 


First 


1:00-1.50 


8:00- 9:15 


Monday, June 28 


9:00-12:00 


Second 


2:00-2:50 


9:25-10:40 


Monday. June 28 


2:00- 5:00 


Third 


3:00-3:50 


10:50- 12:05 


Tuesday, June 29 


9:00-12:00 


Fourth 


4:00-4:50 


12:15- 1:30 


Tuesday. June 29 


2:00- 5:00 


Fifth 


5:00 - 5:50 
First Meeting 


1:45- 3:45 

Second Term 
Regular Daily 


Tuesday, June 29 


arranged 


Class period 


July 1 


Schedule 


Examinations 


First 


1:00-1:50 


8:00- 9:15 


Thursday, August 5 


9:00-12:00 


Second 


2:00 - 2:50 


9:25 - 10:40 


Thursday, August 5 


2 


00- 5:00 


Third 


3:00-3:50 


10:50-12:05 


Friday. August 6 


9 


00-12:00 


Fourth 


4:00-4:50 


12:15- 1:30 


Friday, August 6 


2 


00- 5:00 


Fifth 


5:00-5:50 


1:45- 3:45 


Friday, August 6 




arranged 



29 

Courses of Instruction 



Courses numbered 100-200 are primarily for freshmen; 200-300 primarily for 
sophomores; 300-400 primarily for juniors, seniors, and graduate students; and 400- 
500 for graduate students. 

Credits for undergraduates and semester hours of credit for graduate students are 
shown by numerals immediately after the course title — for example. (4) or (3). To 
translate credits into hours, a four-credit course is assigned 3.6 semester hours. Some 
laboratory courses have numerals after course descriptions to show the number of hours 
per week normally spent in the laboratory — for example. (Lab — three hours). The 
symbol P — followed by course numbers or titles shows prerequisites for the course. 

A normal load is two courses, or eight undergraduate credits, in each five-week term. 
Undergraduate courses normally carry four credits each and graduate courses three 
semester hours of credit each. 

Unless otherwise indicated, classes for all courses except laboratory science courses 
meet daily Monday through Friday, and on the first, third, and fifth Saturdays in the first 
term, and on the second Saturday (July 10) in the second term for periods of seventy- 
five minutes each. Science lecture and laboratory courses meet from 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 
p.m. on the dates indicated above in each term. 

Although such occurrences are rare, the University reserves the right not to offer 
courses in the summer session for which there is insufficient registration; to modify, 
withdraw, or make substitutions for any course; and to change the instructor for any 
course indicated in this bulletin. The schedule supplement available at registration 
should be consulted for changes. Location of classes will be indicated on the supplement 
also. 

Anthropology 

151. General Anthropology I. Archeology and Human Evolution. (4) Origin and 
evolution of man with a focus on human biological and sociocultural change during the 
Plio-Pleistocene. (Credit will not be granted for both Anthropology 151 and Anthropol- 
ogy 162.) 

Second Term/10:50-12:05 Weaver 

152. General Anthropology II. Cultural Anthropology. (4) A cross cultural analy- 
sis of human institutions with a survey of major theories, explaining cultural variety and 
human nature. (Credit will not be granted for both Anthropology 152 and Anthropology 
341.) 

First Term/10:50-12:05 Banks 

381, 382. Archeological Research. (4,4) The recovery of anthropological data 
through the use of archeology, taught in the excavation and interpretation of a prehistor- 
ic site. P-Anthropology 151 and permission of instructor or Anthropology 162. (See 
special programs.) Woodall 

Special Term/July 12-August 20 

383, 384. Field Research in Cultural Anthropology. (4,4) Training in techniques 
for study of foreign cultures, carried out in the field. P— Anthropology 151, or 152, or 



30 



162. (See special programs.) Evans 

Special Term/June 14-July 5 

Biology 

111. Biological Principles. (5) Fundamental principles and concepts in biology. 

(Five credits or four semester hours) 

Lecture 8:00-9:00 and 12:00-1:00 daily 

Laboratory 9:00-12:00 daily 

First Term Lane 

150. Organismic Biology. (5) Morphology and phylogeny of plants and animals. 

(Five credits or four semester hours) P — Biology 111 or permission of instructor. 

Lecture 8:00-9:00 and 12:00-1:00 daily 

Laboratory 9:00-12:00 daily 

Second Term McDonald 

391, 392, 393, 394. Special Problems in Biology. (2.2,2,2) Independent library 
and laboratory investigation carried out under the supervision of a member of the staff; 
393, 394 not to be counted toward the major. P — Permission of instructor. 
First Term/Hours arranged Staff 

Second Term/Hours arranged Staff 

411, 412. Directed Study in Biology. (1,1) Reading and/or laboratory problems 
carried out under the supervision of a faculty member. P — Permission of instructor. 
First Term/Hours arranged Staff 

Second Term/Hours arranged Staff 

491, 492. Thesis Research. (3,3) 

591, 592. Dissertation Research. (Hours to be determined.) 

Business and Accountancy 
Business 

201. Quantitative Methods 1. (4) Techniques of analysis of numerical data, including 
descriptive statistics, linear correlation and regression, statistical estimation, and hypo- 
thesis testing. P — Mathematics 157. 

First Term/10:50-12:05 Dewasthali 

202. Quantitative Methods II. (4) Decision theory emphasizing the combined use of 
information from historical data, subjective judgments, and sampling results in business 
decision making. Nonparametric statistics and linear programming models included. 
P— Business 201 

Second Term/10:50-12:05 Ewing 

211. Organizational Theory and Behavior. (4) The study of macro and micro 
organizational design — structure, processes, development, climate, behavior, and 
performance evaluations. P — Junior standing. 
First Term/10:50-12:05 Ewing 



31 



231. Financial Management. (4) Analysis of financial decision making at the level of 

the individual business enterprise. P — Accountancy 112. 

First Term/9:25-10:40 Thomas 



Accountancy 

111. Accounting Principles I. (4) The basic accounting process and underlying 
principles pertaining to the preparation and interpretation of published financial state- 
ments. 

First Term/9:25-10:40 Cook 

112. Accounting Principles II. (4) A continuation of Accountancy 111 with em- 
phasis on managerial accounting. P — Accountancy 111. 

Second Term/9: 25-1 0:40 Staff 

151. Intermediate Accounting. (4) A detailed analysis of theory and related prob- 
lems for typical accounts on published financial statements. P — Accountancy 112. 
First Term/9:25-10: 40 Hylton 

152. Intermediate Accounting. (4) A continuation of Accountancy 151. P — 
Accountancy 151. 

Second Term/9: 25-1 0:40 Hylton 



Chemistry 

111. College Chemistry. (5) Fundamental chemical principles. Laboratory covers 
experimental aspects of basic concepts. (Five credits or four semester hours) 
Lecture 8:00-10:00 daily 

Laboratory 10:00-1:00 daily 

First Term Gross 

112. College Chemistry. (5) Fundamental chemical principles. A continuation of 
Chemistry 111. Laboratory covers experimental aspects of basic concepts. P — 
Chemistry 111. (Five credits or four semester hours) 

Lecture 8:00-10:00 daily 

Laboratory 10:00-1:00 daily 

Second Term McKneight 

301, 302. Elective Research. (0,0) 

First Term/Hours arranged A Staff 

Second Term)Hours arranged Staff 

391, 392. Undergraduate Resea. ?,' ^,2) 

First Term/Hours arranged Staff 

Second Term/Hours arranged Staff 

491, 492. Thesis Research. (3,3) Staff 

591, 592. Dissertation Research. (Hours arranged) Staff 



32 



Economics 



151. Principles of Economics. (4) A study of individual economic units in a market 
economy, with some attention to monopoly, labor unions, and poverty. 

First Term/9:25 - 10:40 Hydell 

152. Principles of Economics. (4) Attention is focused on the functioning of the 
economy as a whole, with particular reference to employment, inflation, economic 
growth, and policy. P — Economics 151. 

Second Term/9:25-10:40 Fuguitt 

202. Macroeconomic Theory. (4) A study of Keynesian and post-Keynesian theories 
about the determination of the level of national income, employment, and economic 
growth. P — Economics 151. 152. 
First Term 12:15-1:30 Hydell 

Education 

201. Foundations of Education. (4) Philosophical, historical, and sociological 
foundations of education, including analysis of contemporary issues and problems. 
First Term 10:50-12:05 Reeves 

211. Educational Psychology. (4) General principles of adolescent development. 
The nature, theories, processes, and conditions of effective teaching and learning. 
Appraising and directing learning. 
First Term 9:25-10:40 Litcher 

271. Introduction to Geography. (4) A study of the physical environment and its 
relationship to man, including an examination of climate, vegetation, soils, water 
resources, and land forms found in various regions of the world. 

Second Term/12:15-l:30 Preseren 

272. Geography Study Tour. (4) A guided tour to selected areas in Europe to study 
physical, economic, and cultural environments and their influence on man. Background 
references for reading are suggested prior to the tour. (See Special Programs) 

First Term May 24— June 19 (approximate dates) Preseren 

301. Audiovisual Education. (4) Introduction to the field of audiovisual education: 
development and application of skills in the use of instructional materials, equipment, 
and programs. 
First Term 12:15-1:30 Staff 

341. Principles of Counseling and Guidance. (4) Counseling history, philosophy, 

theory, procedure, and process. Therapeutic and development counseling approaches 

in guidance and personnel work in educational, si^ial, business, and community service 

agencies. 

Second Term 9:25-10:40 Roberge 

442. Group Procedures in Counseling. (3) An experiential and conceptual explora- 
tion of the psychological dynamics and interpersonal communication of small groups, 
including the purpose and process of various group procedures such as group guidance, 
group counseling. T-groups. encounter groups, sensitivity training, psychodrama, and 



33 



sensory awareness techniques. P — Education 341 or 441 and permission of instructor. 
First Term/9:25-10:40 Elmore 

443. Vocational Psychology. (3) Vocational development through the life span; 
psychological aspects of work, occupational structure, and the classifications of occupa- 
tional literature, theories of vocational choice, and their implications for vocational 
counseling. 
Second Term/10:50-12:05 Adams 

445. Counseling Practicum and Internship. (3-6) Observation of counseling, 
case study procedures, analysis of tape recorded interview, and role playing; supervised 
counseling experience. 

First Term/Hours arranged Staff 

Second Term/Hours arranged Staff 

463. Seminar in Counseling. (3) P — Permission of instructor. 

First Term/8:00-9: 15 Elmore 

491, 492. Thesis Research. (3,3) 

The following education courses are offered during special terms and hours: 
Special Term I, June 21— July 17 

390. Education of Exceptional Persons. (4) A survey of the types of exceptionality. 
Emphasis will be placed on characteristics, identification, educational programming, 
management, and evaluation. 

Special Term/9:00-10:40 Litcher 

392. The Psychology of the Gifted Child. (4) A discussion of giftedness and 
creativity in children, and its relationship to adult superior performance. Topics to be 
covered include a history of the study of precocity, methods and problems of identifica- 
tion, the relationship of giftedness to creativity, personality characteristics and social- 
emotional problems of gifted children, and the social implications of studying giftedness. 
Special Term/12:40-2:20 Solano 

481. Methodology and Research (Intermediate). (3) Advanced study of the 
methods and materials of a specific discipline in the curriculum (English, social studies, 
mathematics, science) with special attention directed to the basic research in the 
discipline. 
Special Term/12:40-2:20 Shelton 

483. Readings and Research in Education. (1,2. or 3) Independent study and 
research on topics relevant to the student's field of concentration. The course may 
include a special reading program in an area not covered by other courses or a special 
research project. Supervision by far -u member. Hours of credit to be determined prior 
to registration. jgn 

Special Term/Hours arranged H Staff 

Special Term II, July 19— August 14 

391. Teaching the Gifted. (4) A general investigation of theory and practice which 
has special meaning for teachers of the gifted. The course of study includes an examina- 
tion of general curriculum matters such as classroom styles, learning modes, epistemolo- 



34 



gical theories, developmental constructs, and psychosociological patterns which have 

special pertinence to the teacher of the gifted. 

Special Term/3:40-5:20 Milner 

394. Internship in Education of the Gifted. (4) An intensive period of observation 

and instruction of gifted students. Readings and directed reflection upon the classroom 

experience will be used to develop a richer understanding of such a special school 

setting. 

Special Term/Hours arranged Milner 

431. Foundations of Curriculum Development. (3) Investigation of general and 

special curriculum matters, K-12. 

Special Term/10:50-12:30 Epstein 

481. Methodology and Research (Primary). (3) Advanced study of the methods 
and materials of a specific discipline in the curriculum (English, social studies, mathe- 
matics, science) with special attention directed to the basic research in the discipline. 
Special Term/9:00-10:40 Shelton 

483. Readings and Research in Education. (1,2, or 3) Independent study and 
research on topics relevant to the student's field of concentration. The course may 
include a special reading program in an area not covered by other courses or a special 
research project. Supervision by a faculty member. Hours of credit to be determined 
prior to registration. 
Special Term/Hours arranged Staff 



English 

160. Survey of Major British Writers. (4) Eight to ten writers representing different 

periods and genres; primarily lecture. 

First Term/9:25-10:40 Shorter 

170. Survey of Major American Writers. (4) Nine to eleven writers representing 
different periods and genres; primarily lecture. 

First Term/8:00-9: 15 Moss 

Second Term/8:00-9: 15 Maine 

322S. Double-vision in Renaissance Literature. (4) Study of the presence in 
Renaissance poetry, prose, and drama of multiple views of people, the world, events, 
and ideas. Works by Shakespeare, Marlowe, Sydney. Donne, Bacon, Browne, and 
others. v 

Second Term/9:25-10:40 L Brailow 

371S. A Comparative Study of Nathaniel ..*thorne and Henry James. (4) 

Study of selected novels, short stories, and criticism to examine the relationship between 
these two pivotal nineteenth-century figures, focusing in particular on their attitudes 
toward American culture and the role of the artist. (Some attention will be given to 
biography and secondary criticism.) 
First Term/10:50-12:05 Reynolds 



35 



405S. Old English Language and Literature. (3) Introduction to Old English 
language, with readings in selected poems and prose, and a study of Beowulf in 
translation. Examination of the historical and cultural context of Old English literature. 
Second Term/ 10:50-12: 05 Overing 

427S. Seminar in Seventeenth Century British Literature. (3) Concentration on 
attitudes toward creation, cosmic order, nature, and human effort, mainly in poetry. 
Short papers, oral reports, and seminar discussion. 
First Term/9:25-10:40 Ettin 



French 

153. Intermediate French. (5) A review of grammar and composition with practice in 
conversation. Reading of selected texts. Class meets daily for two periods. Lab required. 
P — French 112, 113, or two years of high school French. 
First Term/9:25-10:40 and 12:15-1:30 Beaudry 

181. Swiss French Civilization. (4) The course is designed to acquaint the student 
with the Swiss people and their civilization through living for a few weeks with families. 
Visits are made to points of cultural interest, historical, literary, and artistic. A journal and 
a paper describing in detail some aspect of Swiss French civilization, both in French, are 
required. Usually offered in the summer. 
First Term/May 13^June 10 Parker 

214. Masterpieces of French Literature II. (4) Reading of selected texts in French. 
Particular periods, genres, and authors may vary from summer to summer. Parallel 
reading and reports. Satisfies either the basic or the divisional requirement. Only one 
course in masterpieces may count toward the major. P — French 153 or equivalent. 
Second Term/10:50-12:05 Wells 

History 

101. The Rise of the West. (4) A survey of ancient, medieval, and early modern 
history to 1700. 

First Term/12: 15-1:30 Hendricks 

102. Europe and the World in the Modern Era. (4) A survey of modern Europe 
from 1700 to the present. 

Second Term/10:50-12:05 Smiley 

152. The United States Since 1865. (4) Political, social, economic, and intellectual 

aspects. 

First Term/10:50-12:05-«c.. , v Smith 

342. The Middle East from _, I'eman the Magnificent to the Present. (4) Major 
subjects covered are the rise and fall of the Ottoman Empire, the Arabs and Persians 
under Ottoman hegemony, the rise of Arab nationalism, the emergence of the modern 
Arab states, and their role in the post-World War II era. 
Second Term/9:25-10:40 Gokhale 



36 



344. Modern China. (4) The Manchu Dynasty and its response to the Western 
challenge; the 1911 Revolution; the warlord era and the rise of the Communists; 
Chinese Communist society; the Cultural Revolution. 
First Term 9:25 - 10:40 Sinclair 

357. The Civil War and Reconstruction. (4) The political and military events of the 

war and the economic, social, and political readjustments which followed. 

Second Term 12:15-1:30 Yearns 

398. Individual Study. (4) A project in an area of study not otherwise available in the 
department; permitted upon departmental approval of petition presented by a qualified 
student. 

First Term Hours arranged Staff 

Second Term Hours arranged Staff 

399. Directed Reading. (1-4) 

First Term Hours arranged Staff 

Second Term Hours arranged Staff 

463S, 464S. American Foundations. (6) A survey of the European heritage and 
colonial environment which developed into the American culture of the late eighteenth 
and nineteenth centuries. A cooperative program of the University and Reynolda House 
involving the staffs of both institutions. Lectures provide a continuity of theme; Old 
Salem and other historic sites provide opportunities for giving history a visual dimen- 
sion. A research project is required. Primarily for teachers: scholarships available. (See 
special programs.) 
June 21-July 30 Hours arranged Bragg. Covey. Millhouse 

481, 482. Directed Reading. (3.3) 

First Term Hours arranged Staff 

Second Term Hours arranged Staff 

491. 492. Thesis Research. (3.3) 



Humanities 

215. Germanic and Slavic Literature. (4) A study of approximately twelve works in 
translation taken from Germanic and Slavic literatures. Satisfies a Division I require- 
ment. 

First Term 9:25-10:40 Sellner 

216. Romance Literature. (4) A study of approximately twelve works in translation 
from Romance literature. Satisfies a Division 1 requirement. 

Second Term 9:25-10:40 Ganelin 

264. Greek and Roman Comedy. (4) Representat; works of Aristophanes. Menan- 

der. Plautus. and Terence, with attention to the ongins and development of comedy. A 

knowledge of the Greek and Latin languages is not required. Satisfies a Division I 

requirement. 

First Term 10:50-12:05 MacQueen 



37 



Mathematics 

The following courses can be used as credit toward basic requirements in Division II: 
Mathematics 111. 112. 115. 116. and 157. 

111. Calculus with Analytic Geometry I. (5) Differential and integral calculus and 
the basic concepts of analytic geometry. (Credit not allowed for both 116 and 111.) 
Laboratory two hours. 

First Term 9:25 - 10:40 Graham May 

112. Calculus with Analytic Geometry II. (4) Continuation of topics in Mathemat- 
ics 111. Laboratory two hours. 

Second Term/8:00-9: 15 Wadill 

115. Finite Mathematics. (4) Probability and statistics, matrices, linear program- 
ming, Markov chains, and theory of games. 

First Term/8:00 - 9: 15 Hayashi 

116. The Essential Calculus. (4) A one-semester course in differential and integral 
calculus, with application to business and the social sciences. (Credit not allowed for 
both 116 and 111. Students who may take additional calculus should not take 116.) 
Laboratory two hours. 

Second Term/9:25 - 10:40 Howard 

155. Introduction to FORTRAN Programming. (4) Lecture and laboratory A 
study of FORTRAN language. Students use computer terminals as well as card input. 
First Term/10:50-12:05 Hayashi 

157. Elementary Probability and Statistics. (4) Probability and distribution func- 
tions, means and variances, and sampling distributions. (Credit not allowed for both 156 
and 157. No credit after this course for Sociology 380.) Laboratory two hours. 
First Term,9:25-10:40 Gaylord May 

Second Term 10:50-12:05 Gentry 

381. Individual Study. (2, 3, or 4) A choice of study in an area of individual interest, to 
be directed by a faculty adviser. 

First Term/Hours arranged Staff 

Second Term/Hours arranged Staff 

491, 492. Thesis Research. (3,3) 

Military Science 

202S. Combined Military Fundamentals. (4) History and organization of the 
United States Army. Basic and intr. mediate military skills to include leadership styles 
and techniques, land navirv-*;~- .ismounted drill, mountaineering, and marks- 
manship. Class time"-**. \\j z .j- 3:45 p.m., five days per week with one weekend 
overnight field trip. (Offered in ^\<? summer only. A minimum of six students must enroll 
for class to be offered. ) Not available to students who have taken more than one military 
fundamentals course. 

First Term/ 1:45-3:45 MTWTF McBride 

Second Term/ 1 : 45-3 : 45 MTWTF Evaro 



38 



Music 



290S. Marching Band Techniques. (1) 

June 18-19Hours arranged Burgess 

Philosophy 

111. Basic Problems of Philosophy. (4) An examination of the basic concepts of 
several representative philosophers, including their accounts of the nature of know- 
ledge, man. God, mind, and matter. 

First Term 9:25-10:40 Hester 

First Term/10:50-12:05 Washburn 

Second Term 9:25-10:40 Washburn 

Second Term, 10:50-12:05 Pritchard 

Physical Education 

310. Applied Field Study. (2) A course involving application and methods of solving 
problems in a specialized area, according to the student's immediate career goals. 
P — Physical Education 251 or permission of the instructor. 

First Term Hours arranged Hottinger 

Second Term/Hours arranged Hottinger 

382. Independent Study in Health and Physical Education. (1-4) 

First Term Hours arranged Staff 

Second Term Hours arranged Staff 

463S. Advanced Biomechanics. (3) An in-depth study of the mechanical principles 
which influence human movement. Topics include kinetics, kinematics, cinematogra- 
phy, and electrogoniometry. Prerequisites are any of the following: anatomy, kinesiolo- 
gy, physics, or permission of the instructor. 
Second Term Hours arranged Meissier 

465S. Graded Exercise Testing and Evaluation of Work Capacity. (3) The study 
of the rationale for the use of graded exercise testing in the evaluation of functional work 
capacity. Lectures include the analysis of different modes of evaluation: treadmill, 
bicycle ergometer, arm ergometer, and field testing, with the application of results in the 
evaluation of normal and cardiac patients. Laboratory experiences include the use of 
electrocardiogram, ergometers, and metabolic analyzers in the assessment of functional 
capacity. 
Second Term Hours arranged Ribisl 

482. Independent Study. (1-3) Staff 

491, 492. Thesis Research. (3,3) Staff 



Physics 



111. Introductory Physics. (5) A basic course for freshmen and sophomores, includ- 
ing the elements of mechanics, properties of matter, wave motion, sound, heat, electric- 
ity and magnetism, light, and some of the recent developments in physics. Lecture two 



39 



hours daily. Laboratory two hours, Monday through Friday. (Five credits or four- 
semester hours) 
First Term/8:00-12:30 Shields 

112. Introductory Physics. (5) A continuation of Physics 111. Lecture two hours 
daily. Laboratory two hours, Monday through Friday. (Five credits or four semester 
hours) 

Second Term/8:00-12:30 Matthews 

491, 492. Thesis Research. (3,3) Staff 

Politics 

113. The American Political Order. (4) This course is an examination of the 
American political system through a study of its basic political documents, its institutions, 
and its current values. Beginning with a reading of Tocqueville's Democracy in America, 
the course will explore the problems inherent in a democratic order, the institutional 
features supporting a republican form of government, and the relationship between the 
political order and the literature, arts and popular media. 

First Term/9:25-10:40 Reinhardt 

114. Comparing Political Systems. (4) The course is concerned with understand- 
ing some of the differences in political form, style, and ideology found in diverse 
twentieth-century societies such as those of revolutionary socialist regimes (Cuba), 
modern oligarchies (the Soviet Union), liberal democracies (Great Britain), and others. 
First Term/8:00-9: 15 Moses 

Psychology 

151. Introductory Psychology. (4) A systematic survey of psychology as the 
scientific study of behavior. Prerequisite to all other courses in psychology. 

First Term/9:25-10:40 Staff 

First Term/12: 15-1:30 Best 

Second Term/12: 15-1:30 Staff 

239. Altered States of Consciousness. (4) Examination of altered states of con- 
sciousness with special reference to sleep and dreams, meditation, hypnosis, and drugs. 
P — Psychology 151. 
Second Term/10:50-12:05 Beck 

241. Developmental Psychology. (4) A survey of physical, emotional, cognitive, 
and social development in humans f'om conception to death. P — Psychology 151. 
Second Term/12:15-l:30 Edwards 

260. Social PsycJ^a^' gpJ^B survey of the field, including theories of social 

behavior, interpersonal ai~* . ; or/, attitudes and attitude change, and group behavior. 
P — Psychology 151. 

First Term/9:25-10:40 Burger 

265. Human Sexuality: A Changing Scene. (4) An exploration of the physiological 
and psychological aspects of human sexuality, with attention to changing sexual mores. 



40 

sexual deviances, sexual dysfunction, and sex-related roles. P — Psychology 151. 
Second Term/9:25-10:40 Burger 

268. Psychology of Business and Industry. (4) Psychological principles and 
methods applied to problems commonly encountered in business and industry. P — 
Psychology 151. 
Second Term/8:00-9: 15 Staff 

280. Directed Study. (1-4) 

First Term/Hours arranged Staff 

Second Term Hours arranged Staff 

335. Fundamentals of Human Motivation. (4) Description and analysis of fun- 
damental motivational phenomena, with special reference to human problems, includ- 
ing reward and punishment, conflict, anxiety, affection, needs for achievement and 
power, aggression, creativity, and curiosity. P — Psychology 151. 
First TermT0:50-12:05 Beck 

344. Abnormal Psychology. (4) Descriptive analysis of the major types of abnormal 
behavior, with focus on organic, psychological, and cultural causes and major modes of 
therapy. P — Psychology 151. 
Second Term/12: 15-1:30 Staff 

358. Psychology of Woman. (4) The course has two principal objectives: to provide 
students with a better understanding of the behavior of women by reviewing and 
analyzing research and theory, and to stimulate students to assess their own attitudes 
and beliefs. The course atmosphere is informal but research-oriented. The major 
content areas include biological and evolutionary issues, sex similarities and differences, 
and motivational issues unique to women. P — Psychology 151. 
First Term 8:00-9:15 Jourdan 

467. Neuropsychology and Learning Disabilities. (3) Language, perceptual 
motor, and emotional deficits arising from neurological factors studied in the context of 
brain functioning and information processing and applied to learning disabilities in 
children, in both theoretical and practical terms. P — Permission of instructor. (Taught at 
the Bowman Gray School of Medicine.) 
First Term 4:00-5:15 Wood 

482. Readings and Research in Psychology. (1.2. or 3) 

First Term Hours arranged Staff 

Second Term Hours arranged Staff 

. 

491, 492, Thesis Research. (1-3. 1-3) Staff 

Religion 

111. Introduction to the Old Testament. (4) A survey of the Old Testament 

designed to introduce the student to the history, literature, and religion of the ancient 

Hebrews. 

First Term/8:00-9: 15 Hamrick 



41 



112. Introduction to the New Testament. (4) A survey of the literature of the New 

Testament in the context of early Christian history. 

First Term/10:50-12:05 Horton 

166. American Religious Life. (4) A study of the history, organization, worship, and 
beliefs of American religious bodies, with particular attention to cultural factors. 
Second Term/9:25-10:40 Mitchell 

218. Seminar in the Mediterranean World. (4) Travel and study in such countries 

as Greece. Italy, Turkey, Eqypt, Lebanon, Syria, and Israel. 

First Term/arranged Talbert 

286, 287. Directed Reading. ( 1-4, 1-4) A project in an area of study not otherwise 
available in the department, permitted upon departmental approval of a petition pre- 
sented by a qualified student. 

First Term/Hours arranged Staff 

Second Term/Hours arranged Staff 

315, 316. Field Research in Biblical Archeology. (4, 4) A study of the religion and 

culture of the ancient Near East through the excavation and interpretation of an ancient 

site. 

July 3-August 3 Hamrick 

401, 402. Directed Reading. (3.3) Staff 

491, 492. Thesis Research. (3, 3) Staff 

Sociology 

151. Principles of Sociology. (4) General introduction to the field: social organiza- 
tion and disorganization, socialization, culture, social change, and other aspects. 
First Term/12: 15-1:30 Staff 

Second Term/10:50-12:05 Gulley 

205. Photography in the Social Sciences. (4) Explores the use of photography as a 
research technique for the social sciences: camera and darkroom instruction included. 
There is a $60.00 supplies fee: students must have access to a 35mm camera. 
First Term/9: 25- 10: 40 Perricone 

248. Marriage and the Family. (4) The social basis of the family, emphasizing the 

problems growing out of modern conditions and social change. 

Second Term/9:25-10:40 Earle 

341. Criminology. (4) Crime, its nature, causes, consequences, methods of treat- 
ment, and prevention. P — Sociology 151. 
Second Term/12: 15-1:30 „*"■' ' Bechtel 

Spanish 

112. Elementary Spanish II. (4) A course for beginners covering grammar essentials 
and emphasizing speaking, writing, and the reading of elementary texts. P — Spanish 
111 or equivalent. Lab required. 
First Term/9:25-10:40 Bryant 



42 

153. Intermediate Spanish. (5) A review of grammar and composition, with practice 

in conversation. Reading of selected texts. Class meets daily for two periods, with 

one-half hour of laboratory time. P — Spanish 112, 113, or two years of high school 

Spanish. 

First Term/8: 00-9 :15 and 10:50-12:05 Martin 

214S. Introduction to Hispanic Literature. (4) Selected readings in Spanish and 
Spanish American literature. Designed as a substitute for either Spanish 215 or 216. 
P — Spanish 153 or equivalent. 
Second Term/9:25-10:40 Newton 

Speech Communication and Theatre Arts 

121. Introduction to Theatre. (4) A survey of all areas of theatre arts. Experience in 
laboratory and University Theatre productions. (May be used to satisfy a requirement in 
Division 1.) Laboratory — Three hours. 

First Term/9:25-10:40 Tedford 

Second Term/9:25-10:40 Staff 

151. Public Speaking I. (4) A study of the nature and fundamentals of speech 
communication. Practice in the preparation and delivery of short speeches. 
Second Term/8:00-9: 15 Hill 

153. Interpersonal Communication. (4) The course is divided into three parts: 
communication theory, person-to-person communication, and small group interaction. 
First Term/10:50-12:05 Louden 

156. Oral Interpretation of Literature. (4) Fundamentals of reading aloud, with 

emphasis on selection, analysis, and performance. 

First Term 12:15-1:30 Shirley 

161. Voice and Diction. (4) A study of the principles of voice production, with 

emphasis on phonetics as a basis for correct sound formation. 

First Term 9 : 25- 1 0: 40 Shirley 

280. Special Seminar: Intercultural Communication— U.S. /Chinese Rela- 
tions. (4) The intensive study of selected topics in communication. 
Second Term 9:25-10:40 Go 

282. Individual Study. (4) Special research and readings in a choice of interest to be 
approved and supervised by a faculty adviser. 

First Term/Hours arranged v Staff 

Second Term'Hours Arranged Staff 

283-B. Radio Practicum I. (2) Individual projects. fnr/^Hes organizational meetings, 
faculty supervision, and faculty evaluation. (No studen'rp^- -r. :." 5jc more than two 
credits per term.) Pass Fail only. , - 1 ' 

First Term Hours arranged Staff 

Second Term/Hours arranged Staff 

355S. Directing the Forensics Program. (DA pragmatic study of the methods of 
directing high school and college forensics with work in the High School Debate 



43 



Workshop. Offered in the summer only. 

First Term Hours arranged Staff 

480. Special Seminar: Intercultural Communication— U.S. /Chinese Rela- 
tions. (3) The intensive study of selected topics in communication. 

Second Term 9:25-10:40 Go 

481, 482. Readings and Research in Speech Communication and Theatre 
Arts. (3) 

First Term/Hours arranged Staff 

Second Term/Hours arranged Staff 

491, 492. Thesis Research. (3.3) Staff 




44 



The Administration 



Date following name indicates year of appointment. 



James R. Scales (1967) President 

B.A.. Oklahoma Baptist; MA. Ph.D.. Oklahoma: Litt.D . 
Northern Michigan: LL D.. Alderson-Broaddus; LL.D.. Duke: Litt.D.. Belmont Abbey 

Edwin Graves Wilson (1946. 1951) Provost 

B.A.. Wake Forest; A.M.. Ph.D.. Harvard 



Manson Meads (1947. 1963) 

BA.. California: M.D.. Sc.D.. Temple 

John G. Williard (1958) 

B.S., North Carolina (Chapel Hill 



Vice President for Health Affairs and 
Director of the Medical Center 

Vice President and Treasurer 



G. William Joyner Jr. (1969) 
B.A.. Wake Forest 

Russell H. Brantley Jr. (1953) 
BA. Wake Forest 

Thomas E. Mullen (1957) 

B.A.. Rollins: M.A.. Ph.D.. Emorv 



C.P.A.. North Carolina 

Vice President for Development 

Assistant to the President and 
Director of Communications 

Dean of the College 

Dean of the Graduate School 

Dean of the School of Law 



Henry Smith Stroupe (1937) 

B.S., MA. Wake Forest; Ph.D.. Duke 

John D. Scarlett (1955. 1979) 

BA. Catawba: J.D.. Harvard 

Edward L. Felton Jr. (1980) 

B.A.. Richmond; B.D.. Southeastern 
Baptist Seminary; M.B.A.. D.B.A.. Harvard 

Richard Janeway (1966) 

B.A.. Colgate. M.D.. Pennsylvania 

Thomas C. Tavlor (1971) 

B.S., M.A.. North Carolina (Chapel Hill): 
Ph.D.. Louisiana State: C.P.A.. North Carolina 

Percival Perry (1939. 1947) 

B.A.. Wake Forest: M.A.. Rutgers: Ph.D.. Duke 

David Allen Hills (1960) 

BA. Kansas; M.A.. Ph.D.. Iowa 

Mark H. Reece (1956) 
B.S.. Wake Forest 

Lu M. Leake (1964) 

B A . Louisiana State: M.R.E.. Southern Baptist Seminary 

Edward R. Cunnings (1974) 

BSM.. M.Ed.. St. Lawrence 

Michael Ford (1981) Director of the College Union 

BA.. Wake Forest: M.Div.. Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary 



Dean of the Babcock Graduate 
School of Management 

Dean of the Bowman Gray 
School of Medicine 

Dean of the School of Business 
and Accountancy 

Dean of the Summer Session 

Coordinator of Student Services 

Dean of Men 

Dean of Women 

Director of Housing 



45 



Linda Kelly (1981) 

B.A.. Wake Forest; M.Div . Southwestern 
Baptist Theological Seminary 

Joseph C. McGill (1981) 

B.A . SUNY (Cortland) 

Edgar D. Christman (1956. 1961) Chaplain 

B.A., J.D.. Wake Forest; B.D.. Southeastern Baptist Seminary; S.T.M.. Union Seminary 



Summer Resident Director 
(Second Term) 

Summer Resident Director 
(First Term) 



Brian M. Austin (1975) 

B.A.. Monmouth; M.S.Ed.. Ph.D.. Southern Illinois 



Director of the Center for 
Psychological Services 



Mary Ann H. Taylor (1961. 1978) 
B.S.. M.D.. Wake Forest 



Director of University Student Health Services 



Ben M. Seelbinder (1959) Director of Records and Institutional Research 

B.A.. Mississippi Delta State; M.A.. PhD . North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 



Margaret R. Perry (1947) 
B.S.. South Carolina 

William G. Starling (1958) 
B.B.A.. Wake Forest 

Carlos 0. Holder (1969) 
B.B.A.. Wake Forest 



Registrar 

Director of Admissions and Financial Aid 

Controller and Assistant Treasurer 



G. Eugene Hooks (1956) Director of Athletics 

B.S.. Wake Forest; M.Ed.. North Carolina (Chapel Hill); Ed.D.. George Peabody 

Dorothy Casey (1949) Director of Women's Athletics 

B.S.. Woman's College. North Carolina; M.A.. North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 




46 

The Summer Faculty 

Date following name indicates year of appointment. 

Fred Adams Visiting Associate Professor of Education 

Ph.D.. University of Virginia 

E. Pendleton Banks (1954) Professor of Anthropology 

B.A.. Furman; A.M.. Ph.D., Harvard 

H. Kenneth Bechtel (1981) Visiting Assistant Professor of Sociology 

B.A.. M.A.. North Dakota 

Robert C. Beck (1959) Professor of Psychology 

B.A.. Ph.D.. Illinois 

Deborah L. Best (1972, 1978) Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., M.A., Wake Forest 

Catherine-Anne Beaudry (1981) Instructor in Romance Languages 

B.A.. Catholic University; M.A.. Columbia 

David G. Brailow (1979) Visiting Assistant Professor of English 

B.A.. Amherst; M.A.. Ph.D.. Oregon 

Shasta M Brvant (1966) Professor of Romance Languages 

B A, M.A., Ph.D.. North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Jerry Martin Burger (1980) Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A.. M.S.. California State (Fresno); Ph.D.. Missouri 

Leon P. Cook Jr. (1957) Associate Professor of Accountancy 

B.S.. Virginia Polytechnic; M.S.. Tennessee; C.P.A.. Arkansas 

Cyclone Covey (1968) Professor of History 

B.A.. Ph.D.. Stanford 

Arun P. Dewasthali (1975) Associate Professor of Business 

B.S.. Bombay; M.S.. Ph.D.. Delaware 

John R. Earle (1963) Professor of Sociology 

B.A.. Wake Forest; M.A.. Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

C. Drew Edwards (1980) Visiting Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A.. Furman; M.A.. Wake Forest; Ph.D.. Forida State 

Leo Ellison Jr. (1957) Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

B.S.. M.S.. Northwestern State 

Thomas M. Elmore (1962) Professor of Counseling Psychology 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A.. George Peabody: Ph.D.. Ohio State 

Marcia Epstein Visiting Associate Professor of Education 

Ph.D., Ohio State University 

Andrew V. Ettin (1977) Associate Professor of English 

B.A.. Rutgers; MA . Ph.D.. Washington (St. Louis) 

David K. Evans (1966) Associate Professor of Anthropology 

B.S.. Tulane; Ph.D.. California 



47 



Ezequiel B. Evaro (1977) Instructor in Military Science 

B.A.. Armed Forces Institute 

Stephen Ewing (1971) Associate Professor of Business 

B.S.. Howard Payne; M.B.A.. Baylor: DBA.. Texas Tech 

Diana L. Fuguitt (1982) Assistant Professor of Economics 

B.A. Eckerd: Ph.D. Rice 

Charles V. Ganelin (1980) Instructor in Romance Languages 

A.B.. Denison: M.A.. Chicago 

Ivey C. Gentry (1949) Professor of Mathematics 

B.S.. Wake Forest; B.S.. New York; M.A.. Ph.D.. Duke 

Mae Jean Go (1980) Instructor in Speech Communication 

B.A.. Tennessee; M.A.. Illinois 

Balkrishna Govind Gokhale (1960) Professor of History and Asian Studies 

B.A.. M.A.. Ph.D.. Bombay 

William H. Gulley (1966) Associate Professor of Sociology 

B.A.. M.A.. Ph.D.. North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

E. Willard Hamrick (1952) Professor of Religion 

B.A.. North Carolina (Chapel Hill); Ph.D.. Duke 

Elmer K. Hayashi (1973) Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.A.. California (Davis); M.S.. San Diego State; Ph.D.. Illinois 

J. Edwin Hendricks (1961) Professor of History 

B.A . Furman; MA, Ph.D.. Virginia 

Marcus B. Hester (1963) Professor of Philosophy 

B.A.. Wake Forest; Ph.D.. Illinois 

Fred L. Horton Jr. (1970) Associate Professor of Religion 

B.A . North Carolina (Chapel Hill): B.D.. Union Seminary; Ph.D.. Duke 

William L. Hottinger (1970) Professor of Physical Education 

B.S.. Slippery Rock; MS. Ph.D.. Illinois 

Fredric T. Howard (1966) Professor of Mathematics 

B.A . M.A.. Vanderbilt: Ph.D.. Duke 

Richard P. Hydell (1981) Assistant Professor of Economics 

B.A.. Oberlin: Ph.D.. Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Delmer P. Hylton (1949) Professor of Accountancy 

B.S.. MB. A.. Indiana: C PA. Indiana 

John H. Litcher (1973) Associate Professor of Education 

B.S., Winona State; M.A.. Ph.D.. Minnesota 

Bruce D. MacQueen (1980) Visiting Assistant Professor 

B.A . Oklahoma; M.A.. California (Santa Barbara) Classical Languages 

Jasper L. McBride (1980) Assistant Professor of Military Science 

B.A.. Virginia Polytechnic 

Barry G. Maine (1981) Instructor in English 

B.A.. Virginia: M.A.. North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 



48 



Gregorio C. Martin (1976) Associate Professor of Romance Languages 

Diplome, Salamanca (Spain); M.A.. Ph.D.. Pittsburgh 

George Matthews Jr. (1979) Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.S.. Ph.D.. North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

J. Gaylord May (1961) Professor of Mathematics 

B.S.. Wofford; M.A., Ph.D.. Virginia 

W. Graham May (1961) Professor of Mathematics 

B.S.. Wofford; M.A., Ph.D., Virginia 

Stephen P. Meissier (1981) Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

B.S.. M.S.. Rhode Island 

Joseph O. Milner (1969) Associate Professor of Education 

B.A., Davidson; M.A.. Ph.D.. North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Carlton T. Mitchell (1961) Professor of Religion 

B.A.. Wake Forest; B.D.. Yale; S.T.M., Union Seminary; Ph.D.. New York 

Carl C. Moses (1964) Associate Professor of Politics 

A.B.. William and Mary: M.A.. Ph.D.. Uniueristy of North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

William M. Moss (1971) Associate Professor of English 

B.A.. Davidson. Ph.D.. North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Candalas M. Newton (1978) Visiting Assistant Professor of Romance Languages 
B.A.. Salamanca (Spain). M.A.. Ph.D.. Pittsburgh 

Gillian R. Overing (1979) Visiting Assistant Professor of English 

B.A.. Lancashire (England); MA, Ph.D.. SUNY (Buffalo) 

John E. Parker Jr. (1950) Professor of Romance Languages 

B. A.. Wake Forest; M.A.. Ph.D.. Syracuse 

Philip J. Perricone (1967) Associate Professor of Sociology 

B.S.. M.A.. Florida; PhD . Kentucky 

Herman J. Preseren (1953) Professor of Education 

B.S.. California State (Pennsylvania): MA. Columbia: Ph.D.. North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Gregory D. Pritchard (1968) Professor of Philosophy 

B.A.. Oklahoma Baptist; B.D.. Southern Baptist Seminary; Ph.D.. Columbia 

J. Don Reeves (1967) Professor of Education 

B.A.. Mercer; B.D.. Th.M.. Southern Baptist Seminary; Ed.D.. Columbia 

Jon M. Reinhardt (1964) Associate Professor of Politics 

B.A.. Birmingham-Southern: MA . Ph.D.. Tulane 

Mark R. Reynolds (1979) Instructor in English 

B.A.. William and Mary; M.A.. Exeter (England) 

Paul M. Ribisl (1973) Professor of Physical Education 

B.S . Pittsburgh; MA. Kent State; Ph.D.. Illinois 

Charles L. Richman (1968) Professor of Psychology 

B.A.. Virginia; M.A.. Yeshiva: Ph.D.. Cincinnati 

Leonard P. Roberge (1974) Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A.. New Hampshire. M.A.. Atlanta; ED.. Maine 



49 

Mariannne A. Schubert (1977) Visiting Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Dayton; M.A.. Ph.D.. Southern Illinois 

Timothy F. Sellner (1970) Associate Professor of German 

B.A.. Michigan; M.A., Wayne State; Ph.D., Michigan 

Franklin R. Shirley (1948) Professor of Speech Communication 

B.A., Georgetown; M.A.. Columbia; Ph.D., Florida 

Robert N. Shorter (1958) Professor of English 

B.A.. Union College; M.A.. Ph.D., Duke 

Nancy Shelton (1980) Visiting Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A.. High Point College; M.Ed.. North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Michael L. Sinclair (1968) Associate Professor of History 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A.. Ph.D.. Stanford 

David L. Smiley (1950) Professor of History 

B.A., M.A., Baylor; Ph.D., Wisconsin 

J. Howell Smith (1965) Associate Professor of History 

B.A.. Baylor; M.A., Tulane; Ph.D.. Wisconsin 

Cecelia H. Solano (1977) Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Radcliffe; M.A., Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 

Charles H. Talbert (1963) Professor of Religion 

B.A.. Howard; B.D., Southern Baptist Seminary; Ph.D.. Vanderbilt 

Marcellus E. Waddill (1962) Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Hampden-Sydney; M.A., Ph.D., Pittsburgh 

Philip L. Washburn Visiting Instructor in Philosophy 

B.A., Wake Forest 

David S. Weaver (1977) Assistant Professor of Anthropology 

B.A., M.A.. Arizona; Ph.D.. New Mexico 

Byron R. Wells (1981) Instructor in French 

B.A.. M.A.. Georgia 

John E. Williams (1959) Professor of Psychology 

B.S., Richmond; M.S.. Ph.D.. North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Frank B. Wood (1971) Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A.. M.A.. Wake Forest; M.Div., Southeastern Baptist Seminary; Ph.D.. Duke 

J. Ned Woodall (1969) Associate Professor of Anthropology 

B.A.. M.A.. Texas; Ph.D.. Southern Methodist 

W. Buck Yearns Jr. (1945) Professor of History 

B.A.. Duke; M.A.. Georgia. Ph.D.. North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 



50 




51 



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Bulletins of Wake Forest University 

The College 

Director of Admissions and Financial Aid 

7305 Reynolda Station 

Winston-Salem. North Carolina 27109 

919-761-5201 

The Graduate School 

Dean of the Graduate School 

7487 Reynolda Station 

Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109 

919-761-5301 

The School of Law 

Director of Admissions 

7206 Reynolda Station 

Winston-Salem. North Carolina 27109 

919-761-5437 

The Babcock Graduate School of Management 

Assistant Dean for Admissions and Placement 

7659 Reynolda Station 

Winston-Salem. North Carolina 27109 

919-761-5422 

The Bowman Gray School of Medicine 

Associate Dean for Admissions 

300 Hawthorne Road 

Winston-Salem. North Carolina 27103 

919-727-4265 

The Summer Session 

Dean of the Summer Session 

7293 Reynolda Station 

Winston-Salem. North Carolina 27109 

919-761-5664 

Marty Lentz, University Editor 
Terry Hydell. Assistant 



Wake Forest University administers all educational and employment activities without 
discrimination because of race, color, religion, national origin, age. handicap, or sex. 
except where exempt 



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(V 

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Bulletin of 

Wake Forest 
College 

and the School of 
Business and 
Accountancy 

The Undergraduate Schools 
of Wake Forest University 






YZ 






1982-1983 



ew Series April 1982 Volume 77, Number 3 







Bulletin of 

Wake Forest 
College 

and the School of 
Business and 
Accountancy 

The Undergraduate Schools 
of Wake Forest University 

Announcements for 

1982-1983 

rhe Bulletin of Wake Forest University is published seven times annually by the University at Winston-Salem. North Carolina. 

Second class postage paid at Winston-Salem, North Carolina. 

UPS 078-320 

Printed by Winston Printing Company, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27105 



The Calendar 



Fall Semester 1982 



August 27 

August 27-31 

August 29 

August 29 

August 30,31 

September 1 

September 2 

September 14 

September 28 

October 8 

October 1 1 

October 22 

November 25-28 

November 29 

December 10 

December 1 1 

December 13-17 

December 18 

December 19- 

January 12 



Friday 
Friday- 
Tuesday 
Sunday 

Sunday 

Monday, 
Tuesday 

Wednesdav 

Thursday 

Tuesday 

Tuesday 

Friday 

Monday 

Friday 

Thursday- 
Sunday 

Monday 

Friday 

Saturday 

Monday- 
Friday 

Saturday 

Sunday— 
Wednesd; 



Residence halls open at 8 a.m. for first year studer 
Orientation for first year students 

Residence halls open at 10 a.m. for transfer studeii 

and at noon for returning students 
Orientation for transfer students begins at 2 p.m 
Registration for all courses 

Classes begin 
Opening Convocation 
Last day to add courses 
Last dav to drop courses 
Fall holiday 
Classes resume 
Midterm grades due 
Thanksgiving recess 

Classes resume 
Classes end 
Examinations 
Examinations 

Examinations end 
Christmas recess 



1982 



JANUARY 


1 2 


3 


4 


5 6 


7 8 9 


10 


11 


12 13 


14 15 16 


17 


18 


19 20 21 22 23 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


31 









FEBRUARY 






1 2 


3 4 


5 6 


7 


8 9 


10 11 


12 13 


14 


15 16 


17 18 


19 20 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


28 









MARCH 




1 2 3 


4 5 6 


7 8 9 10 


11 12 13 


14 15 16 17 


18 19 20 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


28 29 30 31 





APRIL 






1 2 3 


4 5 6 


7 8 9 10 


11 12 13 


14 15 16 17 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


25 26 27 28 29 30 



MAY 


1 


2 3 4 


5 6 7 8 


9 10 11 


12 13 14 15 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


30 31 





JUNE 








1 


2 3 


4 


5 


6 7 8 


9 10 


11 


12 


13 14 15 


16 17 


18 


19 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


27 28 29 30 







JULY 










1 


2 


3 


4 5 


6 7 8 


9 


10 


11 12 


13 14 15 


16 


17 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


25 26 27 28 29 30 31 



AUGUST 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


29 30 31 



SEPTEMBER 






1 2 


3 


4 


5 6 7 8 9 


10 


11 


12 13 14 15 16 


17 


18 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


26 27 28 29 30 







OCTOBER 


1 2 


3 4 5 6 7 


8 9 


10 11 12 13 14 


15 16 


17 18 19 20 21 


22 23 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


31 





NOVEMBER 




1 2 


3 4 


5 6 


7 8 9 


10 11 


12 13 


14 15 16 


17 18 


19 20 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


28 29 30 







DECEMBER 




1 


2 3 4 


5 6 7 8 


9 10 11 


12 13 14 15 


16 17 18 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


26 27 28 29 30 31 



Spring Semester 1983 



,anuary 
January 

|anuary 

[anuary 

February 

February 

March 

March 

March 

April 

May 

May 

May 

May 
May 
May 



12 


Wednesday- 


Registration halls open at n< 


13,14 


Thursday, 


Registration for all courses 


17 

28 

3 


Friday 
Monday 
Friday 
Thursday 


Classes begin 

Last day to add courses 

Founders' Day Convocation 


11 


Friday 


Last day to drop courses 


11 
12-20 


Friday 
Saturday- 
Sunday 


Midterm grades due 
Spring recess 


21 


Monday 


Classes resume 


29 


Friday 


Classes end 


2, 3 


Monday, 
Tuesday- 


Examinations 


4 


Wednesday 


Reading Day 


5-9 


Thursday- 


Examinations 


10 


Monday 
Tuesday- 


Examinations end 


15 


Sunday 


Baccalaureate 


16 


Monday 


Commencement 



JANUARY 1 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


30 31 



MAY 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


29 30 31 



SEPTEMBER 


1 2 3 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


25 26 27 28 29 30 



1983 



FEBRUARY 


12 3 4 5 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


27 28 



JUNE 


12 3 4 


5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


26 27 28 29 30 



OCTOBER 1 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


30 31 



MARCH 


12 3 4 5 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


27 28 29 30 31 



JULY 


1 2 


3 4 


5 6 7 8 9 


10 11 


12 13 14 15 16 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


31 





NOVEMBER 


12 3 4 5 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


27 28 29 30 



APRIL 






1 2 


3 4 5 6 


7 8 9 


10 11 12 13 


14 15 16 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 



AUGUST 


12 3 4 5 6 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


28 29 30 31 



DECEMBER 






1 2 3 


4 5 6 7 


8 9 10 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


18 19 20 21 


22 23 24 


25 26 27 28 29 30 31 



The Bulletin 



The Calendar 2 

The University 8 

Buildings and Grounds 9 

Computer Center 10 

Libraries II 

Recognition and Accreditation 11 

The Undergraduate Schools 13 

Wake Forest College 14 

Purpose 14 

History and Development 15 

Student Life 22 

Student Government 22 

College Union 2? 

Residence Councils 23 

Interfraternitv and Intersociety Councils 24 

Honor Societies and Professional Fraternities 24 

Academic Awards 24 

Intramural Athletics 25 

Intercollegiate Athletics 25, 

Religious Activities 26 

Cultural Activities 26 

Educational Planning and Placement 27 

Center for Psychological Services 27 

Student Health Service 28: 

Procedures 29 

Admission 29! 

Application 29 

Early Decision 30 

Admission of Handicapped Students 30 

Advanced Placement and CLEP 30 

Admission of Transfer Students 31 L ! 

Expenses 3 1 

Tuition 31 

Room Charges 32) 

Food Services 32: 

Other Charges 321 

Refunds 33; 

Housing 33 

Academic Calendar 34' 

Orientation and Advising 34 

Registration 34! 

Classification 34! 

Class Attendance 35 

Auditing Classes 35 



Dropping a Course 36 

Withdrawal from the College 36 

Examinations 36 

Grading 37 

Grade Reports and Transcripts 38 

Dean's List 38 

Graduation Distinctions 38 

Repetition of Courses 38 

Probation 38 

Requirements for Continuation 39 

Requirements for Readmission 40 

Senior Conditions 40 

Scholarships and Loans 41 

Scholarships 41 

Exchange Scholarships 47 

Loans 47 

Concessions 49 

Other Financial Aid 49 

Special Programs 51 

Honors Study 51 

Open Curriculum 51 

Residential Language Centers 51 

Foreign Area Studies 51 

Study at Salem College 52 

Summer Study 52 

Opportunities for Study Abroad 52 

London 52 

Venice 53 

France 53 

Spain 53 

India 53 

Independent Study 53 

Requirements for Degrees 55 

Degrees Offered 55 

General Requirements 55 

Basic Requirements 56 

Divisional Requirements 56 

Requirement in Physical Education 57 

Proficiency in the Use of English 57 

Completion of Lower Division Requirements 58 

Admission to the Upper Division 58 

Fields of Study in the Upper Division 58 

Maximum Number of Courses in a Department 59 

Options for Meeting Major Requirements 59 

Double Majors and Joint Majors 59 

Minors 59 



,9 



:9 



Interdisciplinary Minor 60 

Foreign Area Studies 60 

Combined Degrees in the School of Law 6 

Combined Degrees in Medical Sciences 6 

Combined Degrees in Medical Technology 62 

Degrees in the Physician Assistant Program 63 

Degrees in Microbiology 63 II 

Degrees in Dentistry 64 

Degrees in Engineering 64 

Degrees in Forestry and Environmental Studies 64 

Courses of Instruction 66 

Anthropology 66 

Art 70 

Asian Studies 74 

Biology 76 

Chemistry 80 

Classical Languages 8! 

Economics 86 

Education 89 

English 95 

German 99 

History 101 

Humanities 105 

Interdisciplinary Honors 107 

Mathematics 109 

Military Science 113 

Music 114 

Philosophy 121 

Physical Education 124 

Physics 128 

Politics 130 

Psychology 135 

Religion 139 

Romance Languages 143 

Sociology 153 

Speech Communication and Theatre Arts 156 

School of Business and Accountancy 163 

Degrees Conferred 169 

Honor Societies 178 

Enrollment 179 

The Board of Trustees 182 

The Board of Visitors 183 

The Administration 185 

The Undergraduate Faculties 191 

Emeriti 206 

The Committees of the Faculty 208 

Index 213 




Reynolda Hall 



The University 



Wake Forest University is characterized by its devotion to liberal learning and 
professional preparation for men and women, its strong sense of community and 
fellowship, and its encouragement of free inquiry and expression. 

Founded in 1834 by the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina, the school 
opened its doors to students on February 3 as Wake Forest Institute, with Samuel 
Wait as principal. It was located in the Forest of Wake County, North Carolina, on the ; 
plantation of Dr. Calvin Jones, near which the Village of Wake Forest later de-J 
veloped. 

Rechartered in 1838 as Wake Forest College, it is one of the oldest institutions of 
higher learning in the state. It was exclusively a college of liberal arts for men until 
1894, when the School of Law was established. The School of Medicine, founded in 
1902, offered a two-year medical program until 1941. In that year the School was.; 
moved from the Town of Wake Forest to Winston-Salem, became associated with the 
North Carolina Baptist Hospital, and was renamed the Bowman Gray School of; 
Medicine in honor of the benefactor who made possible the move and expansion toa- 
full four-year program. In 1942 Wake Forest admitted women as regular under- 
graduate students. 

A School of Business Administration was established in 1948 and for over two J 
decades offered an undergraduate program of study in business. In 1969 the 
undergraduate school was succeeded bv the Department of Business and Accountan- 
cy and the Department of Economics in Wake Forest College; at the same time the 
Babcock Graduate School of Management was established. In 1980 the undergradu-> 
ate program in business and accountancy was reconstituted as the undergraduate 
School of Business and Accountancy. The Division of Graduate Studies was estab- 
lished in 1961. It is now organized as the Graduate School and encompasses ad- 
vanced work in the arts and sciences on both the Revnolda and Hawthorne campuses 
in Winston-Salem. The summer session was inaugurated in 1921. 

In 1946 the Trustees of Wake Forest College and the Baptist State Convention of 
North Carolina accepted a proposal bv the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation to relocate 
the non-medical divisions of the college in Winston-Salem, where the School of 
Medicine was already established. The late Charles H. Babcock and his wife, the late 
Mary Reynolds Babcock, contributed a campus site, and building funds were re- j 
ceived from many sources. Between 1952 and 1956 the first fourteen buildings were 
erected in Georgian style on the new Winston-Salem campus. In 1956 the College 
moved all operations, leaving the 122-year old campus in the Town of Wake Forest to 
the Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary. 

The decade that followed was the College's most expansive, and in 1967 its i 
augmented character was recognized bv the change in name to Wake Forest Uni- 
versity. Today enrollment in all schools of the University stands at over 4,500. 
Governance remains in the hands of the Board of Trustees, and development fori 
each of the six schools of the University is augmented by Boards of Visitors for the 
undergraduate schools and Graduate School, the School of Law. the Graduate 
School of Management, and the School of Medicine. A joint board of University 
Trustees and Trustees of the North Carolina Baptist Hospital is responsible for the' 



Medical Center, which includes the hospital and the School of Medicine. Alumni and 
parents' organizations are also active at Wake Forest, and support by the Z. Smith 
Reynolds Foundation and other foundations and corporations is strong and con- 
tinuing. 

Wake Forest's relationship with the Baptist State Convention is an important part 
of the school's heritage. Wake Forest's founders proposed to establish an institution 
that would provide education under Christian influences. The basis for the con- 
tinuing relationship between the University and the Convention is a mutually 
agreed-upon convenant which grows out of a commitment to God and to each other. 
The covenant expresses the Convention's deep interest in Christian higher education 
and the University's desire to serve the denomination as one of its constituencies. 
Wake Forest receives financial and intangible support from Convention-affiliated 

churches. 

The College, School of Business and Accountancy, Graduate School, School of 
Law, and Graduate School of Management are located on the Reynolda Campus in 
northwest Winston-Salem. The Bowman Gray School of Medicine is about four miles 
away, near the city's downtown on what is known as the Hawthorne Campus. The 
University also offers instruction regularly at Casa Artom in Venice, at Worrell 
House in London, and in other places around the world. 

The College offers courses of study leading to the baccalaureate jn thirty-nine 
departments and interdisciplinary areas. The School of Business and Accountancy- 
offers courses of studv leading to the baccalaureate in business and in accountancy. 
The School of Law offers the Juris Doctor and the Graduate School of Management, 
the Master of Business Administration degree. In addition to the Doctor of Medicine 
degree, the School of Medicine offers through the Graduate School programs 
leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in the basic 
medical sciences. The Graduate School confers the Master of Arts, Master of Arts in 
Education, and Master of Science degrees in the arts and sciences and the Doctor of 
Philosophy degree in biology and chemistry. 

Buildings and Grounds 

Wake Forest is situated on approximately 320 acres; its physical plant consists of 
over thirty buildings, most of which are of modified Georgian architecture and 
constructed of Old Virginia brick trimmed in granite and limestone. The Reynolda 
Gardens annex, consisting of about 150 acres and including Reynolda Woods, 
Reynolda Village, and Reynolda Gardens, is adjacent to the campus. Nearby is the 
Graylyn Estate, where there are residential foreign language centers for students. 

Wait Chapel is named in memory of the first president of the College. Its main 
auditorium seats 2,300 and is the home of the Wake Forest Baptist Church; Dai'is 
Chapel seats 150 and is used by the Church and by the College for smaller services. 
The Wait Chapel tower contains the Janet Jeffrey Carlile Harris Carillon, an instru- 
ment of fortv-eight bells. Wingate Hall, named in honor of President Washington 
Manly Wingate, houses the Department of Religion, and the offices of the University 
Chaplaincy and the Wake Forest Baptist Church. 

Reynolda Hall, across the upper plaza from Wait Chapel, is an administration 



10 

building and student center. Most administrative offices for the Revnolda Campus 
are there, along with the College Union, other student activities, and classrooms. The 
Z. Smith Reynolds Libraiy houses the main collection of books and documents on the 
Revnolda Campus. Along with eight floors of open stacks, having a capacity for about 
1 ,000,000 volumes, it has reading and reference rooms for studv and some academic 
offices. 

Winston Hall houses the departments of biology and psychology, Salem Hall, the 
departments of chemistry and physics. Both buildngs have laboratories as well as 
classrooms and special research facilities. Harold W. Tribble Hall accommodates the 
humanities and social science departments and has a curriculum materials center, an 
honors seminar room, a philosophy library and seminar room, and a larger lecture 
area, DeTamble Auditorium, with an adjacent exhibition gallerv. Instruction in busi- 
ness, accountancy, and mathematics is carried out in Charles H. Babcock Hall, which 
also houses the Babcock Graduate School of Management. The School of Law 
occupies Guy T. Carswell Hall. 

The James R. Scales Fine Arts Center is of contemporary design appropriate to the 
functions of studio art, theatre, and instruction in art history and drama. Off its lobby- 
is a large gallery for special exhibitions. In the art wing are spacious studios for 
drawing, painting, sculpture, and printmaking, along with a smaller gallerv and 
classrooms. In the theatre wing are design and production areas and two technically 
complete theatres, the larger of traditional proscenium design and the smaller for 
experimental ring productions. The music wing contains a concert and lecture hall, 
classrooms, practice rooms for individuals and groups, and the offices of the Music 
Department. 

The William N. Reynolds Gymnasium is equipped with classrooms for instruction in 
physical education, courts for indoor sports, a swimming pool, and offices for the 
Department of Physical Education and for military science. Adjacent are tennis 
courts, sports fields, a track, an Indoor Tennis Center, and the Athletic Center for 
intercollgiate athletics. 

There are seven residence halls for undergraduate men: Kitchin House, Poteat 
House, Davis House. Taylor House, Huffman Hall, Palmer Dormitory, and Piccolo Dormi- 
tory. For women there are five residence halls: Bostwick, Johnson, Babcock, New Dormi- 
tory, and Efird Hall. Just off the main campus are twelve apartment buildings for 
facultv and married students. A town house apartment building has also been 
completed. 



Computer Center 

Two computers are housed in the University's computer center, located in Revnol- 
da Hall. The eight-year-old Hewlett-Packard 3000III system has one million bytes of 
memory and 290 million bytes of disk storage. The Prime 750, installed in February, 
1982, has three million bytes of memory and 600 million bytes of disk storage. There 
are terminals for student and faculty use in various campus locations. Students have 
the opportunity to work with computers for instructional and for research purposes, 
and can minor in Computer Science. 

Computer languages available include FORTRAN, FORTRAN77, BASIC, 



11 

COBOL, RPG, ASSEMBLER, PASCAL, and PL/ 1. Statistical packages such as SPSS, 
MBDP, and IDA can be used for data analysis. 

In addition to the facilities at the computer center and in the adjacent terminal 
room, a remote batch connection with the Triangle Universities Computing Center 
(TUCC) and its IBM 3081 makes access to other statistical packages (notably SAS) 
possible, and makes the programs provided by the North Carolina Educational 
Computing Service (NCECS) available to Wake Forest computer users. Various 
departments on campus use microcomputers, primarily PET's and APPLE'S, for 
research and teaching. 

Libraries 

The libraries of Wake Forest University support research in undergraduate educa- 
tion and in each of the disciplines in which a graduate degree is offered. An 
endowment provided by a substantial gift from the Mary Reynolds Babcock Founda- 
tion and another from Nancy Reynolds has been assigned to the sustained expansion 
and development of library resources, especially; to support the graduate program. 
The libraries of the University hold membership in the Association of Southeastern 
Research Libraries. 

The library collections total 818,711 volumes. Of these, 624,367 constitute the 
general collection in the Z. Smith Reynolds Library, 83, 1 12 are housed in the School 
of Law, 98,76 1 in the library of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine, and 1 2,47 1 in a 
relatively new library in the Babcock Graduate School of Management. Subscriptions 
to 9,989 periodicals and serials, largely of scholarly content, are maintained by the 
four libraries of the University. The holdings of the Z. Smith Reynolds Library also 
include 24,057 reels of microfilm, 265,303 pieces of microcards, microprint, and 
microfiche, and 77,045 volumes of United States government publications. 

Special collections cover the works of selected late nineteenth and early twentieth 
century English and American writers, with pertinent critical material, a Mark Twain 
Collection, a Gertrude Stein Collection, and the Ethel Taylor Crittenden Collection 
in Baptist History. The recent acquistion of the Charles H. Babcock Collection of 
Rare and Fine Books represents an important addition to the resources of the Z. 
Smith Reynolds Library. 

The library instructional program includes an orientation workshop in research 
methods, assistance in independent and directed studies, and bibliographic pre- 
sentations as requested by faculty. 

Recognition and Accreditation 

Wake Forest University is a member of the Southern Association of Colleges and 
Schools, the Southern Universities Conference, the Association of American Col- 
leges, the Conference of Southern Graduate Schools, and the Council of Graduate 
Schools in the United States. The University has chapters of the principal national 
social fraternities, professional fraternities, and honor societies, including Phi Beta 
Kappa and Sigma Xi. The Bowman Gray School of Medicine is a member of the 
Association of American Medical Colleges and is on the approved list of the Council 



12 



on Medical Education of the American Medical Association. The program in 
counseling leading to the Master of Arts in Education degree is accredited by the 
National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education. 

Wake Forest College was accredited bv the Southern Association of Colleges and 
Schools in 1921. The reaccreditation of 1965 included the master's and doctoral 
degree programs in the Division of Graduate Studies. Accreditation was reaffirmed 
in December 1975. 




The James R. Scales Fine Arts Center 



13 



The Undergraduate Schools 



There are two undergraduate schools at Wake Forest University, Wake Forest 
College and the School of Business and Accountancy. The undergraduate schools 
are governed by the Board of Trustees and by their respective faculties and adminis- 
tration. Responsibility for academic administration is delegated by the President and 
Trustees to the Provost, who is chief academic officer of the University. The Deans of 
the schools are responsible for academic planning and administration for their 
schools. Collaborating with the Dean of Wake Forest College are associate and 
assistant deans and the coordinator of student services. Among officers in the area of 
student services are the deans of men and women, who direct residential, social, and 
cultural life with the assistance of a professional staff; and the directors of the 
University Health Service and the Center for Psychological Services. A complete list 
of administrative offices is found in this bulletin beginning on page 185. In many 
administrative areas responsibility is shared, or advice is given by the faculty commit- 
tees listed at the end of this bulletin. 




The Rare Book Room in Z. Smith Reynolds Library 



14 



Wake Forest College 



Wake Forest College is the undergraduate school of arts and sciences of Wak 
Forest University. It is the center of the University's academic life; through it th 
University carries on the tradition of preparing men and women for personj 
enrichment, enlightened citizenship, and professional life. 

Wake Forest College is a place of meeting. Its teachers and students are of divers 
backgrounds and interests, and that diversity is crucial to the distinctive character o 
the College. Wake Forest continuallv examines its educational purpose and evaluate 
its success in fulfilling it. A formal statement of purpose was prepared as part of th 
school's decennial reaccreditation process and was adopted by the Board of Trustees 

Purpose 

The people who wrote the Statement of Purpose were guided by the history 
Wake Forest, particularlv the history of its expressed and implied objectives. Thei 
goal was to articulate the attributes which make Wake Forest distinctive. 

"We believe," they said, "that Wake Forest should be as good an academv a I 
possible. We believe that diversitv should exist in the facultv, staff, and student bod 
and that such diversitv is necessary as Wake Forest seeks to meet its educationa 
responsibilities, and as a guide to those who must make the decisions which wil 
determine the school's character in the future." 

Following is the official statement of purpose of Wake Forest College. 



Statement of Purpose 

Wake Forest is a universitv entrusted with a vital religious heritage and an 
equallv vital tradition of academic freedom. Recognizing the special charac- 
ter of its obligation as an educational institution. Wake Forest assumes the 
responsibilitv of insuring that the Christian faith will be an integral part of 
the University's common life. The University maintains its historic religious 
perspective through an association with the Baptist churches of North 
Carolina, the visible symbol and ministrv of the campus church, the chap- 
laincy, and the Christian commitment of individuals within the faculty and 
administration. At Wake Forest, those who represent this perspective en- 
gage in a continuing dialogue with those of other views who join with them 
in dedication to teaching and learning. Together thev assume responsibility 
for the integritv of the institution and for its commitment to academic 
excellence. 

In keeping with its belief in the value of communitv. Wake Forest also 
recognizes an obligation to preserve its atmosphere of mutual respect and of 
openness to diverse interests and concerns. Its religious heritage, which 
continues to find expression in tradition, ritual, and convocation, provides 
unifving and sustaining values beneficial to the whole community. Because 
of its heritage. Wake Forest fosters honestvand goodwill, and it encourages 



15 



the various academic disciplines to relate their particular subjects to the 
fundamental questions which pertain to all human endeavor. 

Along with the value of community, Wake Forest respects the value ol the 
individual, which it expresses through its concern for the education of the 
whole person. In view of this concern, a basic curriculum composed of the 
liberal arts and sciences is essential to the objectives of the College. This 
means that though the usefulness of professional and technical courses is 
acknowledged, it is necessarv that such courses be related to a comprehen- 
sive program of humanistic and scientific studies. In particular, this objec- 
tive requires an acceptable level of proficiency in those linguistic and mathe- 
matical skills which are basic to other pursuits. It also calls for a study of the 
major contributions from one or more representative areas within the 
natural sciences, the social sciences, and the humanities, including an ex- 
amination of integrating disciplines such as religion, philosophy, and his- 
tory. Such a course of study, when made an essential part of the total 
offering, prevents the premature specialization which threatens effective 
communication among the disciplines, and it addresses the fundamental as 
well as the vocational needs of the student. Wake Forest expects that all of 
the courses in its curriculum will make significant demands upon the talents 
of the student and will encourage the development of a humane disposition 
and an inquiring spirit. 

History and Development 

Since 1834 Wake Forest College has persevered — sometimes barelv — through 
A»ars, economic crises, and controversy. In spite of these difficulties, perhaps because 
af them, the College has developed its distinctive pattern of characteristics: tenacity, 
ndependence, a fierce defense of free inquiry and expression, and a concern that 
knowledge be used responsibly and compassionately. 

That these qualities have often been passed along to Wake Forest's students is 
evident in the lives many have led. That these characteristics have served the school 
.veil is displayed by its growth from a small sectarian school to one of the nation's 
significant small private universities. 

A brief history of Wake Forest is useful in understanding the University as it is 
:oday and appreciating the process through which it developed. 

The founding of Wake Forest College in 1834 was one manifestation of the 
ntellectual and humanitarian reform movement in North Carolina and the nation 
iuring the 1830s. The beginnings of the College and the formation of the Baptist 
State Convention of North Carolina were closely interwoven: a leading motive for the 
organization of the Convention was that it serve as an agency for establishing an 
nstitution that would provide education under Christian influences. 

The leaders in the movement for Convention and College were ministers and 
aymen from diverse backgrounds: Martin Ross, a North Carolinian; Thomas Mere- 
iith, a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania; and Samuel Wait, a graduate of 
Columbian College in Washington, D. C. The inspiration of Ross, the scholarship of 
Meredith, and the leadership of Wait combined to lead the Baptists of North 



16 



Carolina into the formation of the Baptist State Convention on March 26, 1830. Wait 
was appointed as the Convention's agent to explain to churches, associations, and 
others the need for a college to provide "an education in the liberal arts in fields 
requisite for gentlemen." 

For nearly three years Wait traveled over the state in his wagon, speaking to a large 
number of the approximately 15,000 Baptists who lived in the Piedmont and coastal I 
counties. Perhaps as many as one-half opposed missions, education, and other 
benevolences, but after two years of educational canvassing Wait reported enough 
sentiment in favor of the program of the Convention to proceed. 

A 600-acre plantation, located sixteen miles north of Raleigh, was purchased from 
Dr. Calvin Jones in 1832 for $2,000, and the North Carolina Legislature was asked to 
grant a charter for a literary institution based on the manual labor principle. The 
lobbying of opponents, both Baptist and non-Baptist, was effective; only the tie- 
breaking vote of William D. Moseley, speaker of the Senate and a graduate of thei 
University of North Carolina, secured passage of the charter-granting bill. It was a; 
meager charter, subject to various restrictions and limited to a period of twenty years, 
but the birth of Wake Forest had been achieved. Its subsequent growth would be the 
result of creative adjustments and successful responses to a series of other challenges. 

After his successful three-year canvass of the state, Samuel Wait was elected 
principal of the new institution. Sixteen students registered on February 3, 1834; 
before the end of the year seventy-two had enrolled. The manual labor principle,, 
adopted as a partial means of financing the institution, was abandoned after five 
vears, and the school was rechartered in 1838 as Wake Forest College. 

The economic crisis of 1 837 had such an adverse effect that support for the College 
and student enrollment steadily declined; only a loan of $10,000 from the State 
Literary Fund in 1841 prevented bankruptcy. During these years of arduous strug- 
gle to keep the College alive. President Wait exhausted his physical strength and,! 
contracted an illness which forced him to resign the presidency in 1845. 

William Hooper succeeded Wait, and the prospects of the College became bright- j 
er. Hooper, a grandson of one of North Carolina's three signers of the Declaration of 
Independence, had received his education at the University of North Carolina. As a| 
native North Carolinian with Family connections extending over several generations, 
he was able to mobilize public opinion in support of the College. 

After Hooper's resignation the Trustees elected to the presidency Professor of: 
Mathematics John B. White, a graduate of Brown University. Since the mortgages on 
the physical facilities had been paid during Hooper's tenure, fund raising efforts! 
during President White's administration could be concentrated on increasing thei 
College endowment. The Trustees authorized a capital campaign and selected as its 
leader Washington Manly Wingate, an 1849 graduate who within a year and a half 
raised approximately $33,000. 

But the temper of the times was unsuited to leadership by a Northerner, and 
President While resigned in 1854. The Trustees chose as his successor Wingate, then 
twenty-six years old and the first alumnus of the College to serve as president. Under 
his vigorous leadership, which spanned nearly three decades, the quality of students 
improved and new faculty members were added. During the first eight years of 
Wingate's administration, sixty-six students graduated — more than half of the total 



17 



graduated during the first twenty-three years in the life of the College. In 1857 
President Wingate launched a campaign to produce an additional endowment of 
$50,000, over one-half of which was raised in a single evening during the 1857 
meeting of the Convention. 

This period of growth and expansion was cut short by the division of the nation in 
1861. The Conscription Act of 1863 did not exempt students, and for three years of 
the Civil War the College suspended operations. The buildings were used briefly for 
a girls' school; after 1863 the Confederate government used College facilities as a 
military hospital. 

Following Sherman's march through the South and Lee's surrender at Appomat- 
tox, a peace of desolation pervaded the region. Supporters of Wake Forest surveyed 
what remained: College buildings, now leaky and in poor repair; approximately 
$1 1,700 from a pre-war endowment of $100,000; the former president and faculty; a 
loyal group of trustees. There was also something else; an indomitable spirit of 
determination that Wake Forest should emerge from the wreck of war and fulfill its 
mission. 

The needs of the College were great and financial prospects poor, but in Novem- 
ber 1865, barely six months after the end of the war, nine members of the Board of 
Trustees, acting with unwarranted courage, authorized the resumption of classes. 
Wingate was persuaded to resume the presidency, and on January 15, 1866, fifty-one 
students enrolled. The number increased as the South and its economy slowly 
recovered. 

President Wingate realized that the people of North Carolina had to be awakened 
to the need for education in the renascent south, and that thev must be persuaded 
that Wake Forest could help serve that need. To launch this campaign, a Baptist- 
sponsored, statewide educational convention was held in Raleigh, but before funds 
could be collected, the financial crisis of 1873 ended all immediate hope for endow- 
ment. The failure of the 1873—74 fund raising campaign placed the College in a 
precarious position. The triple encumbrances of war, reconstruction, and financial 
panic made it evident that little money could be raised in North Carolina. The 
Committee on Endowment of the Board of Trustees appointed James S. Purefoy, a 
local merchant and Baptist minister, as agent to solicit funds in the Northern states 
for continued operation of the College. While serving as treasurer of the Board 
before the war, he had salvaged $1 1,700 from the pre-war endowment of $100,000 
by persuading the Trustees to invest half of the endowment in state bonds. After two 
years of unrelenting and often discouraging labor, without remuneration, he placed 
in the hands of the Trustees the sum of $9,200. 

It was also in the bleak days of financial uncertainty that a Wake Forest student, 
James W. Denmark, proposed and founded the first college student loan fund in the 
United States. A Confederate veteran, Denmark had worked six years to accumulate 
enough money for his own college expenses. Soon after entering Wake Forest in 
1871 he realized that many students had the same great financial need. From his 
meager funds he spent five dollars for post cards and wrote to college presidents 
across the country asking how their loan funds were organized. When he found that 
the colleges had none, he enlisted the support of faculty and students at Wake Forest 
and in 1877 persuaded the Legislature to charter the North Carolina Baptist Student 



Loan Fund. Now known as the James W. Denmark Loan Fund, it is the oldest college 
student loan fund in the United States and has assets of S325.000 to serve the needs 
of students according to the purposes of its founder. 

By the close of President Wingate's second administration in 1879, the College had 
been successfully revived. The endowment had been increased and new construction 
had begun. Perhaps the greatest service President Wingate rendered was bringing to 
the College a faculty of highly qualified scholars who served the College with 
distinction and dedication over many years. Among them were Professors William G. 
Simmons (1855-88), William Royall (1859-70; 1880-92), William Bailev Royall 
(1866-1928), Luther Rice Mills (1867-1907), and Charles Elisha Taylor (1870- 
1915), who served as president from 1884 to 1905. Two other scholars who became 
tutors or adjunct professors in the last year of President Wingate's administration 
were also destined to play important roles in the life of the College: Needham Y. 
Gulley, who established the School of Law in 1894 and served as its first dean for 
thirty-six vears, and biologist William Louis Poteat, who served the College for fiftv 
vears. twenty-two of them as president. 

The administration of President Thomas Henderson Pritchard, which followed 
that of President Wingate, was brief and served principally to further Wingate's 
efforts to persuade Baptists and other North Carolinians to improve the deplorable 
condition of education in the state. The second alumnus of the College to serve as 
president, Pritchard was an eloquent speaker whose prominent leadership among 
Baptists increased the patronage of the College and improved its image among its 
constituency. 

Charles Elisha Taylor, whom President Wingate had brought to the facultv in 
1880, was elected in 1884 to serve as the sixth president. 

Tavlor's administration from 1884 to 1905 brought enrichment of the academic 
program in a variety of wavs. Academic departments were increased from eight to 
thirteen, and the size of the facultv more than doubled. Two new schools were added: 
the School of Law in 1894 and the School of Medicine in 1902. Progress in other areas 
included the addition of buildings and the landscaping of the campus. Over 400 trees 
were planted, making Magnolia grandiflora almost synonymous with the Wake Forest 
campus. 

President Tavlor was succeeded by William Louis Poteat. Affectionatelv known as 
"Doctor Billy" to students during and after his twenty-two year administration, he 
continued to promote the general growth of all areas of College life. Special emphasis 
was placed on development in the sciences, reflecting in part the interests of the 
president and in part the need to enrich the pre-medical training required bv the new 
School of Medicine. 

As student enrollment increased from 313 in 1905 to 742 in 1927, there was a 
corresponding increase in the size of the faculty. Registration in religion, English, 
education, and the social sciences required more administrative direction, and a dean 
and a registrar were emploved along with a library staff. Propelled bv the trend of the 
other colleges in the state. Wake Forest gave more attention to sports and achieved an 
envied reputation in baseball and football. Also notable during President Poteat's 
administration was the continued growth of the endowment. 

Beyond these significant material advances. President Poteat brought distinction 



19 



in the form of state and national recognition. A devout Christian, an eloquent 
ispeaker, and an accomplished scholar, he became a national leader in education and 
iprobably the foremost Baptist layman in the state. As a distinguished scientist he was 
|among the first to introduce the theory of evolution to his biology classes. The 
IChristian commitment in his personal and public life enabled him to defend success- 
fully' his views on evolution before the Baptist State Convention in 1922, in a major 
victory for academic freedom that attracted nationwide attention. Through his 
influence and that of Wake Forest alumni who supported his view, the North 
Carolina Legislature refused to follow other Southern states in the passage of 
anti-evolution laws in the 1920s. 

During the administration of Poteat's successor, Francis Pendleton Gaines (1927- 
1930), the academic program continued to improve. In 1930 the Trustees selected 
Thurman D. Kitchin. dean of the medical school, to fill the presidency. Kitchin was a 
member of a family prominent in state and national affairs: one brother, William W. 
Kitchin, had served as governor of North Carolina; another, Claude Kitchin, had 
served as majority leader in the United States House of Representatives. Kitchin's 
twenty-year administration was one of progress in the face of many obstacles — 
Depression, destructive campus fires (one of which destroyed venerable Wait Hall), 
the disruption caused by World War II, and a depleted student body. 

Notable accomplishments during this period were the approval in 1936 of the 
School of Law by the American Bar Association and in 1941 the removal of the 
School of Medicine to Winston-Salem, where it undertook full four-year operation in 
association with the North Carolina Baptist Hospital as the Bowman Gray School of 
Medicine, named after the benefactor whose bequest made expansion possible. 

World War II brought other changes. Although the College was able to remain 
open, enrollment dropped in 1942 to 474. The College met this crisis by modifying its 
century-old admissions policy and becoming a coeducational institution that year. In 
the post-war period, enrollment mushroomed with the return of the veterans and 
reached a peak of 1,762 by 1949. Just before World War II a 17,000,000 capital 
expansion campaign for buildings and endowment had been launched by President 
Kitchin. The war forced the postponement of construction, but out of the campaign 
came a proposal which offered another war-ridden Wake Forest an opportunity for 
yet another rebirth. The Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation proposed that up to 
$350,000 a year of its income (an amount which lias steadily increased over the years) 
be given in perpetuity to the College, provided that the entire College be relocated in 
Winston-Salem and that other friends of the College provide a campus site and 
buildings. In 1946 the Board of Trustees, the Convention, and the Baptist constit- 
uency of the state accepted the Reynolds proposal. Charles H. Babcock and his wife 
Mary Reynolds Babcock offered a 320-acre tract of their Revnolda estate as a site for 
the new campus. 

To move an institution over 100 years old from its rural setting 1 10 miles to a new 
campus in an urban area required leadership of great vision, determination, and 
youthful vigor. To succeed President Kitchin, who retired on his sixty-fifth birthday, 
the Trustees in 1950 elected to the presidency Harold Wayland Tribble, then 
president of Andover Newton Theological School and a noted Baptist theologian. 



20 



President Tribble immediately began to mobilize alumni and friends of the College 
and the Baptist State Convention, in support of the great transition. 

In the spring of 1951, William Neal Reynolds and Nancy Reynolds offered ar 
anonymous challenge gift of $2,000,000 on condition that the College raise 
13,000,000 by June 30, 1952. The deadline was extended and the challenge met by 
January 1953. Mr. Reynolds died in September 1951 (the Foundation assumed his 
$ 1 ,500,000 share of the challenge grant) and he willed Wake Forest $ 1 ,000,000, to be 
paid at the time of removal. In recognition of his bequest the new gvmnasium wasj 
named for him. Because of the capital funds received from the Reynolds Founda- 
tion, the Trustees voted that the library be named the Z. Smith Reynolds Library and 
the administration building Reynolda Hall. 

Groundbreaking ceremonies were held in Winston-Salem on October 15, 1951, 
when a crowd of more than 20,000 watched President Harry Truman lift the first 
shovel of dirt to begin construction of the new Wake Forest campus. Between 1951 
and 1956 fourteen buildings were erected; the removal of the College to its new 
home was accomplished in time for the opening of the summer session in 1956. 

During the next eleven years of President fribble's administration the College 
experienced many changes. It had revised its curriculum before moving to the new 
campus, offering greater flexibility to students, whose number increased to 3,022. 
The size of the faculty expanded, reducing the student/teacher ratio to fourteen-to- 
one. 

Additional resources came to the College in its new home. In 1954 the will of 
Colonel George Foster Hankins provided over SI, 000. 000 to be used for scholar- 
ships. In 1956 the Ford Foundation contributed $680,000 to the endowment of the 
undergraduate program and $1,600,000 to the Bowman Gray School of Medicine. 
After the completion of a challenge gift of $3,000,000 offered in 1965, the Founda- 
tion raised its annual contribution to $620,000. The holdings of the University's 
libraries more than tripled, and the Z. Smith Reynolds Library was awarded the 
income from an endowment fund of $4,500,000 contributed bv the Mary Reynolds 
Babcock Foundation and Nancy Reynolds. 

Graduate work, first offered in 1866 but suspended during the removal program, 
was resumed in 1961 with the establishment of the Division of Graduate Studies. In 
1967, recognizing the augmented resources of the College, the Trustees officially 
changed the institution's name to Wake Forest University. The Division of Graduate 
Studies became the Graduate School and the name Wake Forest College was retained 
as the designation for the undergraduate school. 

After seventeen years of strenuous effort. President Tribble retired in 1967, 
leaving as his lasting memorial the removal of the College from Wake Forest to 
Winston-Salem and its changed status from college to university, with enhanced 
resources and academic distinction. As his successor the Trustees chose James Ralph 
Scales, former president of Oklahoma Baptist University and former dean of arts 
and sciences at Oklahoma State University. Since his administration began there have 
been important new developments. The Guv T. and Clara H. Carswell Scholarship 
Fund, valued at $1,600,000, was established in 1967 in support of the undergraduate 
college. The new Graduate School of Management in 1969 was named in honor of 
Charles H. Babcock. Through the generosity of the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation 



21 



id Nancy Reynolds, a building was constructed to house the Babcock School; a 
ibsequent gift of $2,000,000 was received from the Mary Revnolds Babcock Foun- 
dation for endowment. The James R. Scales Fine Arts Center was opened in 1976, 
larking a major phase of the College's growth in comprehensive liberal arts educa- 
on. An athletic center and additions to the School of Law building, Guy T. Carswell 
tall, have further expanded the physical resources of the Reynolda Campus. 

Wake Forest has expanded its programs as well as its physical facilities. The 
[niversity offers study for the baccalaureate degree in over thirty areas listed on 
age 59. Exchange programs with local institutions and with universities abroad have 
rrther expanded the range of choice and opportunity. In addition. Wake Forest 
laintains residential centers in Venice and London for foreign study within the 
ollege curriculum. 

Further development planned by Scales' administration is in the areas of increas- 
ig endowment for many parts of the University and completing construction of the 
ine Arts Center with the addition of a music wing. 




The Old Campus 



22 

Student Life 



Student life at the University is designed to offer a wide range of social, cultun 
religious, and athletic resources to complement academic studies. The University i 
community, and the sense of community is fostered by rich opportunities for person- 
al growth. 

Student Government has jurisdiction over all undergraduate students. The Co 
lege Union plans, directs, and funds activities. Men's social fraternities and women! 
societies are governed by the Interfraternity and Intersociety Councils respectivel I 
A Residence House Council and a Women's Residence Council represent all studen 
who live on campus. There are chapters of the major honor societies and profession; J 
societies for qualified students, and the University makes a number of academ J 
awards for distinguished student achievement and service. Intercollegiate athletiij 
for men and for women and an intramural sports program are strong, distinguished 
by tradition and bv performance. Religious activities are central to the life of thl 
University and, like campus cultural opportunities, are distinctive. The Universal 
offers a number of additional services to students relating to their physical an| 
mental health, spiritual growth, and preparation for life. 



Student Government 

The executive branch of the Student Government is comprised of the four studej 
bodv officers — president, vice president, secretary, treasurer — and the executii 
advisory committees. Reporting directly to the officers are various committees whk 
work on improving service to students. These committees are open to all student 

The Student Legislature is composed of fifty-five student representatives; the vi( 
president of the student bodv serves as speaker. The Legislature represents tf 
interests of students in social and academic matters and promotes and funds projec 
of benefit to the student bodv and the larger community. It oversees disbursement < 
funds to student groups and recommends the chartering of newly formed studei 
organizations. Major committees are the Charter Committee, the Student Budgi 
Advisory Committee, and the Student Economic Board. 

The Honor Code is an expression of the concern that students act with honor an 
integrity. It is an integral part of the Student Government as adopted by students ani 
approved bv the faculty. Its essence is that each student's word can be trustel 
implicitly and that any violation of a student's word is an offense against the whqj 
community. The honor system obligates students neither to give nor receive aid d 
any examination, quiz, or other pledge work; to have complete respect for tn 
property rights of others; not to make false or deceiving statements regardiri 
academic matters to another member of the University community, nor to give falf 
testimony or refuse to pay just debts; and to confront any student who has violate! 
the honor system and tell him or her that it is his or her responsibility to repoi 
himself or herself or face the possibility of being reported to the Honor Counci 

The Honor Council consists of ten members — two co-chairmen selected by th 



23 



anor Council of the previous year plus two representatives from each class. There 
e three non-voting faculty advisers. 

It is the dutv of the Honor Council to receive, prefer, investigate, and arrange trial 
oceedings for all charges of violations of the Honor Code. A student who is found 
ilty of premeditated cheating is immediately suspended or expelled from the 
liversity. For convictions of lying, stealing, bad debts, interfering with the Honor 
luncil, or other forms of cheating, the maximum penalty is expulsion and the 
nimum penalty is probation. Expulsion is automatic upon conviction for a second 
fense. All actions of the Honor Council are reported in writing to the Dean of the 
illege or the Dean of the School of Business and Accountancy. 
Any student convicted of violating the Honor Code is ineligible to represent the 
liversity in any way until the period of punishment — whether suspension, proba- 
n, or another form — is completed and the student is returned to good standing. A 
ident who has been suspended can be readmitted to the College only on the 
proval of the faculty or its Committee on Academic Affairs. During the period of 
spension the student cannot be certified to another institution as being in good 
.nding. 

The Case Referral Panel receives reports on violations of regulations, conducts 
cessarv investigations, and draws up specific charges. Certain cases are referred to 
I Director of Housing. Otherwise, where a plea of guilty is entered, the Case 
ferral Panel levies a penalty. If a plea of not guilty or no plea is entered, the case is 
rwarded to the Student Judicial Board. 

The Student Judicial Board is composed of twelve members, at least three men and 
ree women, who are elected at large from the student body. It is the duty of the 
lard to receive, prefer, and try all charges of social misconduct and violations of 
liversitv rules and regulations for individual students as well as student organiza- 
ns not covered bv the Honor Council, the Director of Housing, or the Traffic 
jpeals Board. A student who violates these regulations or who behaves in such a 
iy as to bring reproach upon him/herself or upon the Universitv is subject to 
nalties ranging from verbal reprimand to suspension on the first offense. For 
rther offenses, expulsion may occur. 

College Union 

Under the Director of the College Union there are meeting and recreation rooms, 
inges, offices for student organizations, a coffee house, and an information center. 
le College Union is responsible for scheduling entertainment activities, developing 
d presenting programs to complement academic studies, assisting student orga- 
tations, and providing supporting equipment and services. The College Union 
ard of directors, representing all undergraduate and graduate students, cooper- 
;s with the staff in daily operations and supervises the efforts of a large body of 
^dent volunteers. 

Residence Councils 

The Residence House Council includes all residents and encourages students 



24 



toward a comprehensive concept of education, on the principle that learning is nc 
restricted to the classroom but occurs in important ways through interaction win 
fellow students and faculty in residence hall life. Each house has its own officers ani 
carries out its own academic, athletic, and social programs to give students ai 
opportunity to become actively involved in college life. 

The Women's Residence Council is concerned with nurturing a comprehensi 
concept of education. Occasions are provided for discussions and social and sport 
events. The Women's Residence Council officers are elected by students who live i 
the residence halls. 



Interfraternity and Intersociety Councils 

The Interfraternity Council is the governing body of twelve social fraternities 
Alpha Phi Alpha, Alpha Sigma Phi, Delta Sigma Phi, Kappa Alpha, Kappa Sigm: 
Lambda Chi Alpha, Omega Psi Phi, Pi Kappa Alpha, Sigma Chi, Sigma Phi Epsilor 
Sigma Pi, and Theta Chi. The purpose of the council is to maintain a high standard o 
conduct and scholarship. A student must have a C average for the previous semeste 
or a cumulative C average to be initiated. B\ order of the faculty, students who are o 
probation for any reason may not be initiated into any fraternity until the end of thei 
probationary period. 

The Intersociety Council is the governing body of six societies for women, in eac 
of which membership is selective: Fideles. Lvnks. Sophs, Steps, Strings, and Thvnies 

Honor Societies and Professional Fraternities 

A number of nationally affiliated honor societies have been established: Alphi 
Epsilon Delta (pre-medicine). Beta Beta Beta (biology). Delta Phi Alpha (Cerman 
Delta Sigma Rho/Tau Kappa Alpha (debate). Eta Sigma Phi (classics), Lambda Alphi 
(anthropology). National Collegiate Players and Anthony Aston Society (drama 
Omicron Delta Epsilon (economics), Phi Alpha Theta (history), Pershing Rifles an\ 
Scabbard and Blade (military). Phi Beta Kappa, Omicron Delta Kappa, and Mortal 
Board. There are student sections of the American Institute of Physics and th 
American Chemical Society; professional fraternities include Phi Alpha Delta am 
Phi Delta Phi (law). There are also chapters of the national service fraternities Alphi 
Phi Omega and Circle K, as well as an Accounting Society, the American Marketin; 
Association, a Physical Education Club, a Politics Club, and a Sociology Club. 

Academic Awards 

The following awards are made annually: the A. D. Ward Medal for the senio 
making the best address at commencement; they. B. CurrinMedal for the best oratio 
on the topic "Christ in Modern Life"; the D. A. Brown Prize to the student whos 
writing most merits recognition; the M. D. Phillips Prize to the outstanding senior i: 
Creek or Latin; thejohn }'. Phillips Prize to the outstanding senior in mathematics; th 
H. Broadus Jones Award to the student whose paper shows greatest insight into th 
works of Shakespeare: the Ruth Foster Campbell Award to the student whose ability i 



25 



e Spanish language and spirit of joyful inquiry into Spanish culture have been most 

itstanding; the Forrest W. Clonts Award to the outstanding senior in history; the 

laud H. Richards Award to the outstanding senior in politics; the John Allen Easley 

edal to the outstanding senior in religion; the Lura Baker Paden Medal to the 

itstanding senior in business; the Wall Street Journal Medal and a year's subscription 

thejoumal to the outstanding senior in finance; the A.M. Pullen and Company Medal 

the senior with the highest achievement in accounting; the William E. Speas Award 

the outstanding senior in physics; the Carolina Award to the major in biology who 

rites the best paper on a subject selected by the national biology society; the Biology 

^search Award to the major in biology who does the best piece of original research; 

ie Poteat Award to the student in first year biology who plans to major in biology and 

judged most outstanding. 

The William C. Archie Award, established by a grant from Mrs. William C. Archie 
Ld Dr. and Mrs. William C. Archie Jr., is given each year to the graduating senior 
jho, in the opinion of the Dean of the College and a faculty committee appointed by 
ie Dean, has shown most conspicuously a commitment to liberal learning, to 
:holarship, and to the ideals of Wake Forest College. In odd-numbered years the 
[ward is presented to a woman student; in even-numbered years it is presented to a 
tale student. 

Intramural Athletics 

he intramural program operates under the auspices of the Department of Physical 
ducation. It provides a variety of competitive activities for students, faculty, and 
iaff. There are sports for male, female, and coed participation. Activities usually 
icluded in the intramural program are basketball, cross-country, football, golf, 
landball, racketball, soccer, Softball, swimming, tennis, volleyball, water polo, wrest- 
hg, and weight lifting. 
Students occasionally organize club teams for other sports and activities, which are 
lot taught or directed by the College, but which are conducted as student organiza- 
tans with the approval of Student Government. These have included rugby, karate, 
ie hockey, field hockey, hiking, rappelling, general conditioning, dance, and syn- 
hronized swimming. Students who are interested in a sport not offered through the 
College may organize themselves and petition the Student Government for approval. 

Intercollegiate Athletics 

Under the Director of Athletics, Wake Forest is a member of the Atlantic Coast 
Conference of the National Collegiate Athletic Association and participates in inter- 
ollegiate football, basketball, baseball, golf, tennis, soccer, cross-country, and track. 
!jnder the military science staff there is also an intercollegiate program in riflery. 
! The full scholarship allowed by the National Collegiate Athletic Association covers 
taition, fees, room, board, and books. Wake Forest offers several special scholarships 
jnd awards: the Brian Piccolo Award for the football player judged by the coaching 
taff to best exemplify the qualities of Brian Piccolo during the annual North 
Carolina game; the Brian Piccolo Scholarship for the Chicago-area high school football 



26 



player entering Wake Forest who best exemplifies the qualities of Brian Piccolo; tl 
Arnold Palmer Award for the Wake Forest Athlete of the Year, as judged bv tl 
Monogram Club; the Buddy Worsham Scholarship for one golfer or more; the John I 
Knott Scholarship for one golfer or more. 

Under the Director of Women's Athletics, Wake Forest is a member of the Associ 
tion of Intercollegiate Athletics for Women and participates in basketball, fie 
hockev. golf, tennis, volleyball, cross-country, and track. 

The full scholarship allowed bv the Association of Intercollegiate Athletics P 
Women covers tuition, fees, room, and board. Wake Forest offers scholarships f' 
women in golf, tennis, basketball, volleyball, and cross-countrv. 

Religious Activities 

The Campus Ministry provides a variety of religious activities, including Thursa 
morning worship in Davis Chapel. In addition to seasonal celebrations throughd 
the liturgical vear, there are retreats, Bible-study and discussion groups, and bo.' 
independent and church-related social service in the larger community. Bapti 
Catholic. Episcopal, and Methodist chaplains represent their faiths and participa 
jointly in sponsoring activities. Wake Forest Baptist Church meets for weekly worsh 
in Wait Chapel and embraces students, faculty, and members of the larger commui 
tv. Membership is open without restriction to all who seek its ministry. 

The Ecumenical Institute sponsors lectures, colloquia, and publications whi< 
foster dialogue among clergy and lay members of Catholic. Jewish, and Protesta 
faiths. Most are open to students and to others in the community. 

Cultural Activities 

The University Theatre presents four major productions and several lab pla 
annually, employing faculty, student, and visiting professional directors. Each ve 
the College Union, with the assistance of the University Theatre, sponsors a music 
dinner theatre, directed and performed bv students. WTDD-FM broadcasts vea 
round to the campus and Piedmont North Carolina as an affiliate of National Pubi 
Radio. In addition to student announcers, producers, and technicians, it has a sm 
professional staff. Intercollegiate debate at Wake Forest has a long record of excr 
lence, and the College hosts two annual debate tournaments, the Novice and tf 
Dixie Classic. 

Student publications include Old Gold and Black, a weekly newspaper; The Student 
literary magazine; and The Howler, the yearbook. The College Union sponsors 1 
major speaker series throughout the academic year, and departments in the Collej 
engage specialists for other series. The Institute of Literature is a program of write 
critics, and scholars in English, classical languages. German, and Romance la 1 
guages. The Hester Philosophy Seminar is an annual colloquium devoted to the majl 
problems of philosophy and their impact on the Christian faith and is a joi 
undertaking of the Department of Philosophy and the Ecumenical Institute. T 
Robinson Lectures are held biennially and are administered bv the Department 
Religion. The Department of Psychology sponsors a colloquium series througho 
the academic year. 



27 



Student musicians perform for academic credit in the Choral Union, the Concert 
loir, the Opera Workshop, the University Symphony, the Demon Deacon March- 
rBand, the Symphonic Wind Ensemble, the Concert Band, the Jazz Ensemble, the 
rcussion Ensemble, the Woodwind Quintet, the Brass Quintet, the Madrigal 
lgers, and the Collegium Musicum. 

Under the Director of Concerts, major concerts in the Artists Series are performed 
Wait Chapel by orchestras and artists from around the world. Visiting dance 
oists and companies are scheduled in the James R. Scales Fine Arts Center, and 
;itals are played by both students and guest carillonneurs on the Janet Jeffrey 
rlile Harris Carillon. Students in the Chapel Bell Guild play English handbells for 
nvocations and services in Wait Chapel. The Department of Music sponsors 
rformances by faculty members, students, and visiting artists in most areas of 
plied music instruction. 

All concerts are open to students and to others in the community. 
In addition to studio instruction in the Department of Art, visiting painters, 
rlptors, and printmakers teach on campus and at the nearby Southeastern Center 
r Contemporary Art, sponsored jointly by the University and the Center. Reynolda 
>use has a regular program of instruction in art history related to its special 
llection in American art. The College Union has an expanding collection of 
ntemporary works of art, under student administration and exhibited in Reynolda 
til and elsewhere on campus. The T.J. Simmons Collection of paintings, etchings, 
lographs, and sculpture is also distributed for permanent campus display. An 
live group of student photographers exhibits its own work and that of professional 
otographers in the gallery adjacent to DeTamble Auditorium. Cultural resources 
the community, in addition to Reynolda House and the Southeastern Center for 
intemporary Art, include the historic restored Moravian village of Old Salem, the 
aseum of Early Southern Decorative Arts, the North Carolina School of the Arts 
d its associated professional performing companies in theatre, dance, and music, 
d the Winston-Salem Symphony and Chorale. Folk art, professional art, and crafts 
rs are frequent. 

Educational Planning and Placement 

The Office for Educational Planning and Placement (Room 7 Reynolda Hall) 
fers counseling and consultation over the entire range of educational planning, 
isistance is available in the choice of an academic major and in approaching other 
cisions that relate to professional or career commitments. Undergraduate and 
aduate students are invited to take advantage of these services. The office provides 
tensive library resources for use by students involved in the planning and place- 
snt activities. Interviews with potential employers may be arranged through the 
fice. 

Center for Psychological Services 

Located in Revnolda Hall, the Center for Psychological Services offers psycho- 
irical counseling, testing, and research services to the University community. 



28 



Student Health Service 

The Student Health Service is located in Kitchin House and provides primary cai 
services, including general health maintenance, diagnostic and treatment proo 
dures, and referral to specialists. It is open when residence halls are in operation an 
requires a health information questionnaire on file for all students. The services! 
the clinical staff are covered bv tuition; there are additional charges for injection 
medications, laboratory tests, special physical examinations, and bed care. 




29 

Procedures 



All students are responsible j or familiarizing themselves with the portions oj this bulletin 
I'hich pertain to their course of study. Statements concerning courses and expenses are not to be 
egarded as irrevocable contracts between the student and the institution. The University reserves 
he right to change the schedule of classes and the cost of instruction at any time within the 
Indent's term of residence. 

Admission 

Candidates for admission must furnish evidence of maturity and educational 
achievement. The Committee on Admissions carefully considers the applicant's 
academic records, scores on tests, and evidence of character, motivation, goals, and 
general fitness for studv in the College. The applicant's secondary school program 
must establish a commitment to the kind of broad liberal education reflected in the 
academic requirements of the College. 

Admission as a freshman normally requires graduation from an accredited sec- 
ondary school with a minimum of sixteen units of high school credit. These should 
include four units in English, three in mathematics, two in history and social studies, 
two in a single foreign language, and one in the natural sciences. An applicant who 
presents at least twelve units of differently distributed college preparatory study can 
be considered. A limited number of applicants may be admitted without the high 
school diploma, with particular attention given to abilitv, maturity, and motivation. 

All persons admitted are required to submit a health history, along with the results 
of a physical examination and certain laboratory tests to the Director of the Student 
Health Service. If a person who has been accepted but has not yet enrolled has or 
develops a health problem which, in the judgment of the Director of the Health 
Service, creates a danger to the safety and well-being of the student or others, that 
person may be required to delay matriculation until the problem is resolved. 

Application 

An application is secured from the Office of Admissions in person or bv mail 
(7305 Revnolda Station, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109). It should be com- 
pleted and returned to that office, if possible no later than February 1 for the fall 
semester. Most admissions decisions for the fall semester are made by March 1, with 
prompt notification of applicants. For the spring semester application should be 
completed and returned, if possible no later than October 15. Except in emergency 
the final date for applying for the fall semester is August 5 and for the spring 
semester January 1 . Application on this last-date basis is primarily for non-residential 
students. 

The admission application requires records and recommendations directly from 
secondary school officials. It also requires test scores, preferably from the senior 
year, on the Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College Entrance Examination Board. 
An accompanying Achievement Test is optional. A S20 fee to cover the cost of 
processing must accompany an application. It cannot be applied to later charges for 



30 

accepted students or refunded for others. The University reserves the right to reject any 
application without explanation. 

A S200 admission deposit is required of all students accepted and must be sent to 
the Office of Admissions no later than three weeks following notice of acceptance. It 
is credited toward first semester fees and is refunded in the event of cancellation of 
application by the student, provided written request for refund is received by the 
Office of Admissions no later than May 1 for the fall semester or November 1 for the 
spring semester. (Students notified of acceptance after May 1 for the fall semester or 
November 1 for the spring semester should make the admission deposit within two 
weeks of notification.) Deposits made after May 1 and November 1 are not refund- 
able. Failure to make the admission deposit is taken as cancellation of application by 
the student. No deposit is required for summer session enrollment. 

Early Decision 

An Early Decision plan is available to well qualified high school students who 
decide by the close of their junior year that their first college choice is Wake Forest. 
An Early Decision agreement is required with the application, which is sent to the 
Office of Admissions after completion of the junior year or by late October of the 
senior year. Along with high school record, recommendations, and scores on the 
Scholastic Aptitude Test, at least one Achievement Test, especially in English com- 
position, is strongly recommended. 

Early Decision applicants are notified of acceptance no later than November 1 for 
the fall semester, and the admission deposit is required by January 1. Applicants not 
admitted are asked to submit a senior vear Scholastic Aptitude Test score and first 
semester senior year grade record, or are advised to apply elsewhere. 

Admission of Handicapped Students 

Wake Forest College will consider the application of anv student on the basis of his 
or her personal and academic merit, regardless of physical handicap. Though the 
campus has several levels, a svstem of ramps and elevators makes all its programs 
available to those in w heelchairs or with limited mobility. The University will gladly 
help handicapped students make arrangements to meet special needs. Students who 
seek further information should consult the Admissions Office or the University's 
Office of Equal Opportunity. 

Advanced Placement and CLEP 

Advanced Placement credit for college level work done in high school is available 
on the basis of the Advanced Placement Examination of the College Entrance j 
Examination Board and supplementary information. Especially well-qualified appli- 
cants for advanced standing may also be exempted from some basic and divisional 
courses with credit on the authorization of the department concerned. Credit by 
advanced standing is treated in the same manner as credit transferred from another 
college. 

Under certain conditions especially well prepared applicants may be granted 



31 



limited college credit through the subject tests of the College Level Examination 
Program (CLEP) of the Educational Testing service. Such credit may be assigned 
with the approval of the department concerned or the Dean of the School of Business 
and Accountancy. 

Admission of Transfer Students 

The number of transfer students who can be admitted each year depends upon the 
availability of space in the freshman (second semester), sophomore, and junior 
classes. An applicant for admission who has attended another college must be a 
graduate of a standard junior college or furnish a certificate of honorable dismissal 
stating eligibility in all respects to enter the college last attended, and must have an 
averall average of at least C on all college work attempted. A student who is admitted 
from another college before fully meeting the prescribed admissions requirements 
for entering freshmen must remove the entrance conditions during the first year at 
Wake Forest. 

The writing of transfer students is checked during the orientation period each 
semester, and students whose writing is deficient are given a composition condition. For 
removal of a composition condition the student is required to take English 1 1 during 
:he first semester for which he or she registers following the assignment of the cc. 
Removal of the deficiencv is prerequisite to graduation. 

Courses satisfactorily completed in other accredited colleges are accepted subject 
:o faculty approval. In general, no credit is allowed for courses not found in the Wake 
Forest curriculum. The minimum residence requirement for a baccalaureate degree 
s two academic years, the senior and one other. 

Expenses 

Statements concerning expenses are not to be regarded as forming an irrevocable contract 
letween the student and the University. The costs of instruction and other services outlined 
herein are those in effect on the date of publication of this bulletin, and the University reserves the 
•ight to change without notice the cost of instruction and other sen'ices at any time. 

An admission deposit of $200, which is applied toward tuition and fees for the 
iemester for which the student has been accepted, is required to complete admission. 
Charges are due in full on August 1 for the fall semester and December 15 for the 
spring semester. Faculty regulations require that student accounts be settled in full 
before the student is entitled to receive a grade report, transcript, or diploma, or to 
"egister for the following semester or term. 

Tuition 

Per Semester Per Year 

Full-Time (twelve or more credits) $2,350 $4,700 

Part-Time $145 per credit 

Students enrolled in the College or in the School of Business and Accountancy for 
ull-time residence credit are entitled to full privileges regarding libraries, laborato- 



32 



ries. athletic contests, conceits, publications, the College Union, the Universi 
Theatre, and the Health Service. Part-time students are entitled to the use of tl 
libraries and laboratories but not to the other privileges mentioned above. Thev m;> 
secure a part-time student ID card, admissions to games and concerts, and public 
tions bv paving an activity fee of S75 per semester. 

Room Charges 

Per Semester Per Year 

Double occupancy $355-$360 $710-$720 

Most rooms available for first vear students are S355 per semester for men an 
$360 for women. Other room rentals range from S3 10 to S460. 

Food Services 

A cafeteria, soda shop, and table sen ice dining room are located in Revnolda Hal 
Board plans are available for S800, S950, S 1 , 1 Oo" and S 1 .200 per vear. The format c 
these plans is a credit card system in which the student is charged onlv for the amour'i 
of food purchased at the time it is purchased. The plan mav be used at anv UniversiW 
Food Services facility, and it allows a great deal of flexibility for eating off campu 1 : 

Freshmen living in dormitories are required to participate in one of the board plans. 

Other Charges 

Admission application fee of S20 is required with each application for admission t 
cover the cost of processing and is non-refundable. 

Admission deposit of $200 is required of each student entering for the first time c 
returning after a period of non-attendance and must be sent to the Director ( 
Admissions within three weeks after acceptance for admission or readmission. Th 
deposit is credited to the student's charges for the semester for which he or she hs. 
been accepted for admission. It is refunded if the Director of Admissions is notifie 
in writing prior to Mav 1 for the fall semester and November 1 for the sprin 
semester of cancellation of plans to enter the College. 

Applied music fees are required in addition to tuition for students enrolling for ind 
vidua! class studv in applied music in the Department of Music and are pavable in th 
Office of the Treasurer. The fee for one credit per semester (one-half hour pe 
week) is S90 and for two credits per semester (one hour per week) is S150. Practic 
fees are S 1 5 or S 1 8 for organ practice, $7 or S 1 for piano practice, and S5 or S7 fo 
other instrument practice for one or two hours a dav. 

Hospital bed and board charges are made when the student is confined to the Studer 
Health Service, at a rate of S40.50 per dav. An additional charge is made for specij 
services and expensive drugs. Students must have hospital insurance. A group plan i 
available through the university for those not covered bv a family plan. A S2.0 
charge is added to overdue bills. 

Key deposit of $5 is required for each kev issued to a residence hall room and i 
refunded when the kev is returned. 



33 



Late registration fee of $10 is charged to students registering after the dates set by the 

acuity. 

Library fines are charged for lost books and for violation of other library regulations 
nd are payable in the library. 

A tuition deposit of $200 is required, at a date set bv the Office of the Treasurer, of 
tudents enrolled in the spring semester who expect to return for the fall semester. It 
; credited to the student's University charges and is refunded if the Treasurer is 
; otified in writing prior to June 1 that the student will not return. 

Room change fee of $5 is charged for authorized room changes made after February 
5 in the spring semester. The fine is $20 for any unauthorized change. 

Special examination fee of $2.50 is required for each examination taken to remove a 
ourse condition. 

Student apartment rental is payable at $130 per month. 

Motor vehicle registration and traffic fines are $45 and $5 to $10, respectively. All 
tudents operating a vehicle on campus (including student apartments and the 
iraylyn Estate) must register vehicles they are operating day or night, whether or not 
iwned by the operator. All vehicle registrations must be completed within twenty- 
our hours from the first time the vehicle is brought to campus. Fines are assessed 
gainst students violating parking regulations, copies of which are obtainable from 
he University Public Safety Office. Proof of ownership must be presented when 
pplving for vehicle registration. 

Transcripts of a student's record are issued at a cost of $2 each. 

Refunds 

During the academic year, all students, full- and part-time, receive tuition refunds 
iccording to the following schedule. This policy applies to students dropping courses 
is well as those withdrawing. Withdrawals must be official and students must return 
heir ID cards before claiming refunds. There is no refund of room rent. 

Number of Weeks Percentage of Total Tuition 

Attendance to be Refunded 

1 Total Tuition Less $200 

2 75 percent 

3 50 percent 

4 25 percent 



Housing 

All unmarried freshmen students are required to live in residence halls, except ( 1 ) 
when permission is granted by the Dean of Men or the Dean of Women for the 
student to live with parents or a relative in the Winston-Salem area or (2) by special 
irrangement when space is not available on campus or (3) if the student has lost 
residence hall space because of a room contract violation. Fifth-year students are 
neligible for housing. Married students are not usually allowed to live in residence 
halls except when permitted by the Dean of Men or the Dean of Women. Residence 



34 



halls are supervised by the Director of Housing, the Directors of Residence Life, he? 
residents, and assistants under the direction of the Dean of Men and the Dean i 
Women. 

The following charges per year apply for each student in the residence halls: ij 
Kitchin House, Poteat House. Davis House, Taylor House, Huffman Hall, and Efin 
Hall, $570 for triple rooms, S620 for small double rooms, S710 for large doub 
rooms, and $880 for single rooms; in Johnson and Bostwick Residence Halls, $ 
for double rooms and S860 for single rooms; in Babcock Residence Hall, $820 ft 
double rooms and $910 for single rooms; in New Dormitory, $920 for double room 
in each of four town house apartments, $920 per occupant; at Gravlyn Estate, $92 
per occupant. For each of the fifty-six married student apartments the charge is $13: 
per month. 

Academic Calendar 

The academic calendar of the College and the School of Business and Accountancy 
includes a fall semester ending before Christmas, a spring semester beginning i ( 
January and ending in May. and two Five-week summer sessions. Semesters usuall 
last Fifteen weeks. 

Orientation and Advising 

A three-day orientation period for new students in the College precedes registry 
tion for the fall semester. An academic adviser who is either a member of the facult 
or an upperclassman in the peer-advising program provides guidance during an« 
between registration periods throughout the student's freshman and sophomor 
vears. Advisers meet with students both individually and in small groups. Student 
are encouraged to take the initiative in arranging additional meetings at anv ting 
thev feel a need for advice or other assistance. The adviser suggests and approve, 
courses of instruction until the student declares a major in a Field of study at the enc 
of the sophomore vear. At that time a new adviser is assigned from the department o 
departments concerned. 

Registration 

A two-dav registration period for all students in the College and the School o 
Business and Accountancv opens the fall semester and the spring semester. Registrar 
tion involves ( 1 ) pavment of all tuition and fees in full to the Treasurer, (2) obtaining 
a summarv of prior record from the Registrar, (3) consultation with the academi 
adviser, (4) sectioning of classes by departmental representatives, and (5) veriFicatioi 
of registration cards with class schedules by the Registrar. 

Classification 

Classification of students by class standing and as full-time or part-time is calcu 
lated in terms of credits. Most courses in the College and the School of Business anc 
Accountancv have a value of four credits, but others vary from one credit to Five. Th< 



35 



ormal load for a full-time student is eighteen credits per semester; a slightly heavier 
iad is permitted under certain circumstances. Twelve credits per semester consti- 
ite minimum full-time registration. (Recipients of North Carolina Legislative Tui- 
on Grants must be enrolled for at least fourteen credits each semester — by the tenth 
ay of classes. Recipients of veteran benefits, grants from state government, and 
ther governmental aid must meet the guidelines of the appropriate agencies.) A 
udent may not register for fewer than twelve credits without specific permission 
om the Committee on Academic Affairs to register as a part-time student. 
A full-time student in the fall semester of any year may not be a part-time student 
i the spring semester immediately following. Any student who petitions for part- 
me status within the semester in which he or she wishes to gain such status is not 
igible for a tuition refund. 

The requirements for classification after the freshman year are as follows: sopho- 
lore — the removal of all entrance conditions and the completion of not fewer than 
ventv-nine credits toward a degree, with a minimum of fifty-eight grade points; 
ln i or — the completion of not fewer than sixty credits toward a degree, with a 
linimum of 120 grade points; senior — not fewer than 108 credits toward a degree, 
ith a minimum of 216 grade points. 

Class Attendance 

Attendance regulations place the responsibility for class attendance on the student, 
■ho is expected to attend classes regularly and punctually. One of the most vital 
spects of the residential college experience is attendance in the classrooms; its value 
annot be fully measured by testing procedures alone. Students are considered 
afficiently mature to appreciate the necessity of regular attendance, to accept this 
ersonal responsibility, to demonstrate the self-discipline essential for such perform- 
nce, and to recognize and accept the consequences of failure to attend. Students 
'ho are deemed to be causing their work or that of the class to suffer because of 
bsence or lateness may be referred by the instructor to the Dean of the College or to 
le Dean of the School of Business and Accountancy, as appropriate, for suitable 
ction. Any student who does not attend classes regularly or who demonstrates other 
vidence of academic irresponsibility is subject to such disciplinary action as the 
;ommittee on Academic Affairs may prescribe, including immediate suspension 
rom the College or the School of Business and Accountancv. 

The Office of the Dean of the College maintains a list of students who have been 
bsent from class because of illness certified by the Student Health Service, because 
f other extenuating circumstances, or as authorized representatives of the college 
/hose names have been submitted by appropriate officials forty-eight hours in 
dvance of the hour when the absences are to begin. Such absences are considered 
xcused and a record of them is available to the student's instructor upon request. 
"he instructor determines whether work missed can be made up. 

Auditing Courses 

When space is available after the registration of regularly enrolled students, others 



36 



may request permission of the instructor to enter the course as auditors. No additior 
al charge is made to full-time students in the College or in the School of Business an 
Accountancy; for others the fee is $60 per course, and permission of the appropriat 
dean, as well as that of the instructor, is required. An auditor is subject to attendanci 
regulations and to other conditions imposed bv the instructor. Although an audito 
receives no credit, a notation of audit is made on the final grade report and entered o: 
the record of regularly enrolled students who have met the instructor's require 
ments. An audit course may not be changed to a credit course, and a credit cours' 
mav not be changed to an audit course. 

Dropping a Course 

The last day in each term for dropping a class without a grade of F is listed in th' 
calendar in the front of this catalog. A student who wishes to drop anv course befoi 
this date must consult the Registrar and his or her faculty adviser. After this date, c9 
student who wishes to drop a course must consult his or her faculty adviser, th' 
course instructor, and the Dean of the College or the Dean of the School of Busines' 
and Accountancy as appropriate. If the Dean approves the request, he authorizes th 
student to discontinue the course. Except in the case of an emergency, the grade ii 
the course will be recorded as F. 

If, at anv time, a student shall drop anv course without prior, written approval o 1 
the appropriate dean, the student will be subject to academic probation for til 
following semester or to such other penalities as the Committee on Academic Affair 
of the faculty mav impose. 

Withdrawal from the College 

A student who finds it necessary to withdraw from the College or the School o 
Business and Accountancy must do so through the office of the appropriate dean 
With the approval of the Dean of the College or the Dean of the School of Busines 1 
and Accountancy, no grades are recorded for the student for that semester, but th' 
student's standing in courses at the time of withdrawal is taken into consideratior 
when readmission is sought. If withdrawal is for academic reasons, failing grade' 
may be assigned in all courses in which the student is doing unsatisfactory work, 
student who leaves the College or the School of Business and Accountancy without 
officially withdrawing is assigned failing grades in all current courses, and tht 
unofficial withdrawal is recorded. 

Examinations 

Final examinations are given at regularly scheduled times. All examinations ar 
conducted in accordance with the honor system adopted bv the student body an( 
approved bv the faculty. Under it the student is expected to refrain from unfairnes 
in any form and to report to the Honor Council anv student he or she knows to b 
cheating. Examinations are turned in with a signed statement that no aid has beet 
given or received. 



37 



Grading 

For most courses carrying undergraduate credit there are five final and two 
jnditional grades: A (exceptionally high achievement), B (superior), C (satisfactory), D 
lassing but unsatisfactory), E (conditional failure), F (failure), and I (incomplete). 

Grade of E. The grade of E entitles the student to reexamination at any regular 
xamination period within a year, or during the first week of the fall semester. A 
ermit for reexamination must be obtained in advance from the Registrar, and no 
fade higher than D may be assigned as a result of reexamination. A student who 
oes not remove a conditional failure by reexamination must repeat the course to 
•btain credit for it. 

! Grade of I. The grade of I may be assigned only when because of illness or some 
per emergency a student does not complete the work of the course. If the work 
ecorded as I is not completed within thirty days after the student enters for his or her 
ext semester, the grade automatically becomes F. The instructor must report the 
[nal grade to the Registrar within forty-five days after the beginning of that 
=mester. 

Grade Points. Grades are assigned grade points for the computation of academic 
tverages, class standing, and eligibility for continuation, as follows: for each credit of 
L four points; for each credit of B, three points; for each credit of C, two points; for 
ach credit of D, one point; for each credit of E or F, no points. 

Pass/Fail. To encourage students to venture into fields outside their major areas of 
;ompetence and concentration, the undergraduate schools make available the op- 
ion, under certain conditions, of registering in courses on a Pass/Fail basis rather 
lhan for a letter grade. Courses taken under the Pass/Fail option yield full credit 
khen satisfactorily completed, but whether passed or not they are not computed in 
jhe grade point average. 

A student may count toward the degree no more than twenty-four credits taken on 
[ Pass/Fail basis. Freshmen and sophomores are not eligible to elect the Pass/Fail 
node, but may enroll for courses offered on a Pass/Fail basis only. A student may 
(luring the junior and senior years only elect up to a total of sixteen credits on a 
("ass/Fail basis, but no more than five credits in a given semester. Courses used to 
,ulfill basic, divisional, or major requirements may not be taken on a Pass/Fail basis 
unless they are offered only on that basis. Courses in the major(s) not used for 
.atisfying major requirements may be taken on a Pass/Fail basis only if the depart- 
ment of the major does not specify otherwise. 




Groves Stadium 



38 

Grade Reports and Transcripts 

A midterm report and a final report of grades are issued to students by th 
Registrar in the fall and spring semesters. A final report of grades is issued for eacl 
summer term. 

Copies of a student's cumulative record are issued by the Registrar, but only on th 
written authorization of the student and payment of S2 per transcript. 

Dean's List 

The Dean's List is issued at the end of the fall and spring semesters. It includes al 
full-time students in the College and the School of Business and Accountancy who 
have a grade point average of 3.0 or better for the semester and who have earned nc 
grade below C during the semester. 

Graduation Distinctions 

Graduation distinctions are determined by the grade point system. A degree 
candidate with a total average of not less than 3.80 for all courses attempted \\ 
graduated with the distinction summa cum laude. A candidate with a total average of 
not less than 3.50 for all courses attempted is graduated with the distinction magna 
cum laude. A candidate with a total average of not less than 3.00 for all courses, 
attempted is graduated with the distinction cum laude. Particular conditions apply tc 
students transferring from other colleges or participating in combined degree pro- 
grams. Details are available in the Office of the Registrar. 

Repetition of Courses 

A student may not repeat for credit a course for which he or she has already 
received a grade of C or higher. (When a student repeats a course previously passed 
he may not earn additional credit for that course. Both grades, however, will be 
considered in calculating the student's grade point average.) 

Probation 

A student is responsible at all times for knowing his or her academic standing. Anyi 
student who at the end of the fall semester does not have the grade average normally 
required for continuation at the end of the following spring semester is automatically! 
on academic probation. 

Any student who is placed on probation because of Honor Code or conduct code! 
violations is placed on such special academic probation as the Committee on Academ-j 
ic Affairs imposes. The Committee on Academic Affairs mav at anv time place on 
probation a student whose academic performance or social behavior is inconsistent 
with what the committee deems to be in the best interest of the student or the 
University. 

Anv student convicted of violating the Honor Code is ineligible to represent the 
University in any way until the period of suspension or probation is completed and! 
the student is returned to good standing. Students who are on probation for any 



39 



eason mav not be initiated into any fraternity until the end of their probationary 
jeriod. 



Requirements for Continuation 

Each student is expected to be aware at all times of his academic status and to be 
■ esponsible for knowing whether he has met the University's minimum academic 
equirements for continuation as outlined below. 

On the basis of their cumulative records at the end of the spring semester, those 
.tudents are academically ineligible to enroll for the following fall (1) who have 
ittempted fewer than fifty-four credits in all colleges and universities attended and 
have a grade point average of less than 1.35 on work attempted for a grade in the 
College or the School of Business and Accountancy", (2) who have attempted as many 
is fifty-four but fewer than ninety-eight credits in all colleges and universities 
ittended and have a grade point average of less than 1.65 on work attempted for a 
n-ade in the College or the School of Business and Accountancy; (3) who have 
ittempted as many as ninety-eight but fewer than 135 credits in all colleges and 
jiniversities attended and have a grade point average of less than 1.85 on work 
jittempted for a grade in the College or the School of Business and Accountancy; (4) 
■vho have attempted 135 credits or more in all colleges and universities attended and 
aave a grade point average of less than 1.90 on work attempted for a grade in the 




40 



College or the School of Business and Accountancy. Non-credit courses, cours' 
taken Pass/Fail, and CLEP and Advanced Placement credit are not computed in tl 
grade point average. (For the purpose of determining eligibility for graduation, th 
grade point average is computed on all work attempted in Wake Forest College an 1 
the School of Business and Accountancy, and is also computed on all work attempte : 
in all accredited colleges and universities.) 

Ordinarily a student who is ineligible to continue may attend the First summer ten 
and if successful in raising the grade point average to the required minimum ma 
enroll for the following fall semester. The student may attend the second summd 
term if unsuccessful in the first, and if successful then may enroll for the followim 
spring semester. If unsuccessful in meeting the minimum requirements by the end ( 
the second summer term, the student may apply for readmission no earlier than tb 
following summer session. 

Under exceptionally extenuating circumstances bevond the control of the studen 
and after consultation with the appropriate dean, the student may petition th 
Committee on Academic Affairs for an exception to the foregoing eligibilit, 
requirement. The Committee on Academic Affairs may suspend at the end of am 
semester or term any student whose record for that term has been unsatisfactory 
particularly with regard to the number of courses passed and failed, or anv studen 
who has not attended class regularly or has otherwise ignored the rules anc 
regulations of the College or the School of Business and Accountancy. 

A student who has or develops a health problem which in the judgment of thi 
Director of the Student Health Service creates a danger to the safety and well-beint 
of the student or others may be required to withdraw until the problem is resolved: 

Requirements for Readmission 

A student seeking readmission to the College must meet the minimum academi 
requirements for continuation. However, a student who has not met th< 
requirements (1) may applv for admission to the summer session only, (2) may appl; 
for readmission after an absence from the College of at least a vear and a half. (3) ml 
applv for readmission after less than a year and a half if enrolled in another college oi 
university, or (4) may applv for readmission if the failure to meet minimus 
requirements was due to exceptionally extenuating circumstances bevond the! 
control of the student. 



Senior Conditions 






A candidate for graduation in the final semester who receives a grade of E in thd 
previous semester may applv to the Registrar for reexamination thirty davs after the 
opening of the final semester but not less than thirty days before its close. Al 
conditions must be removed not less than thirty davs before the end of the last 
semester or term of the student's graduation vear. The name of a candidate who has a 
condition after that date is dropped from the list of candidates. A candidate whc 
receives a grade of E in the Final semester or term of the graduation year is not 
allowed reexamination before the next examination period. 



41 



Scholarships and Loans 



Any student admitted to Wake Forest College who demonstrates financial need 

11 receive assistance commensurate with that need. 

By regulation of the Board of Trustees, all financial aid must be approved by the 
Committee on Scholarships and Student Aid. Applications should be requested from 
he committee at 7305 Reynolda Station, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109. 
scholarships supported by funds of the undergraduate schools are not granted to 
jtudents enrolled in other schools of the University. To receive consideration for 
i nancial aid, the applicant must either be enrolled as an undergraduate or have been 
iccepted for admission. The financial aid program comprises institutional, state, and 
federal scholarship, loan, and work funds. Full-time students are eligible to apply for 
hiy of these funds. Half-time students are eligible to apply for federal funds. Half- 
ind part-time students are eligible to apply for limited institutional funds. 
| Need is a factor in the awarding of most financial aid, and each applicant must file a 
financial statement with the application for financial aid. After reviewing the 
standard financial analysis, the Committee on Scholarships determines aid awards, 
i.nd aid is credited, by semester, to the student's account in the Office of the 
freasurer. The Committee on Scholarships reserves the right to revoke financial aid 
or unsatisfactory academic achievement or for violation of University regulations or 
federal, state, or local laws. To be eligible for renewal of aid, a student must remain 
rnrolled on a normal full-time basis and be in good standing, making satisfactory 
progress toward a degree. The committee does not award institutional scholarships 
lo students earning less than a 2.0 grade average on all work attempted at Wake 
Forest. 

Scholarships 

The Reynolds Scholarships, made possible through a grant from the Z. Smith 
leynolds Foundation, are full merit scholarships, covering the cost of tuition, room, 
find board, and including an allowance for books and other personal needs. The 
Reynolds Scholarships are awarded without regard to financial need and will be 
Renewed annually through the recipient's fourth year of college, subject to 
'iatisfactory performance. The University plans to award four Reynolds Scholarships 
;ach year beginning with 1982-83 to extraordinarily capable men and women 
Entering the College as first-year students. 

i The Guy T. Carswell Scholarships, made possible by and established in honor of the 
late Guv T. Carswell and his wife Clara Carswell of Charlotte, North Carolina, carry 
In annual value ranging from a minimum stipend of $ 1 ,500 to a maximum stipend of 
67,000, with awards for more than Si, 500 determined on the basis of need. A 
Carswell Scholar must be a student applying to the College who possesses 
Outstanding qualities of intellect and leadership. Up to forty scholars are selected 
annually. 

The George Foster Hankins Scholarships for Freshmen, made possible by the late Colonel 
Ceorge Foster Hankins of Lexington, North Carolina for residents of North 



42 



Carolina or children of alumni residing in other states, with preference given I j 
residents of Davidson County, North Carolina, have a value up to $7,000. 

The George Foster Hankins Scholarships for Upperclassmen for students who have bee I 
enrolled for at least one semester, with preference given to applicants from Davidsoi I 
Countv, North Carolina, vary in value according to need. 

The Alcoa Foundation Scholarship, donated by the Alcoa Foundation, is available to 
freshman from the Piedmont area who is majoring in chemistrv. The scholarship hi 
a value of $2,000 and is awarded on the basis of need. 

The Alpha Phi Omega Scholarship, established bv the Kappa Theta Chapter of Alph 
Phi Omega, is made available in alternate years to a freshman who presents evidenc 
of need and an excellent high school record. It has a minimum value of $200. 

The Camillo Artom Fund for Italian Studies was established in 1976 in honor o'| 
Camillo Artom, professor of biochemistry from 1939 to 1969. Scholarship aid i 
made available, usually to one or two students each semester, to assist with thei 
expenses. Well qualified students who can demonstrate need are eligible to apply 
(Interested persons should applv in the Office of the Provost.) 

Pell Grants are federal funds awarded to undergraduate students with exceptiona 
financial need who require these grants in order to attend college, for a value of f rorr 
$200 to $1,800 per year. The amount of assistance a student mav receive depend 
upon need, taking into account Financial resources and the cost of attending the' 
college chosen. 

The George M. and Daisy Olive Beavers Scholarship Fund, donated bv Lvdia Beavers ir 
memory of her parents, is for one scholarship awarded on the basis of leadership i 
good citizenship, and excellence of character. 

The Eliza Pratt Brown Scholarship, donated bv the late Junius Calvin Brown eg 
Madison, North Carolina in honor of his wife Eliza Pratt Brown, is used to assist 
needy, worthy, and deserving students from North Carolina, with preference giver 
to students from the town of Madison and Rockingham County, for a maximum o) 
$2,000. 

The J. G. Carroll Memorial Athletic Scholarship, donated in memory of J. G. Carroll, 
former associate professor of mathematics, is made to a deserving athlete who is not 
on a regular athletic scholarship, for a value of approximately $100. 

The James Lee Carver Scholarship, donated bv |ean Freeman Carver with her 
children James Lee Carver II and Elizabeth Jeanine Carver in memory of her 
husband fames Lee Carver, is for deserving and promising students who 
demonstrate a need for financial assistance, with preference given to students from 
the Oxford Orphanage in Oxford, North Carolina, for a value of approximately 
$300. 

The College Scholarships, in the amount of SI 00 to $4,700 each, are available to 
freshmen and upperclassmen presenting satisfactory academic records and evidence 
of need. 

The Jennifer Rose Cooke and Laura Elizabeth Scales Memorial Scholarship established by 
Charles H. Cooke of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma in memory of the daughters of 
Charles H. and Edith Cooke and James Ralph and Bettv Scales, carries a minimum 
stipend of S3, 600 and is awarded on the basis of academic ability and commitment to 



43 



erve in the field of international relations. Application is made to a special 

ommittee. 

I The 0. B. Croiuell Memorial Scholarship Fund, donated by Louise T. Crowell of 
Hendersonville, North Carolina in memory of her husband O. B. Crowell, is 
•warded on the basis of character, need, and promise, for a value of approximately 

B600. 

i The Gary Franklin Culler Scholarship Fund, donated in the memory of the late Gary 

-ranklin Culler, is awarded on the basis of academic ability and outstanding 

leadership potential, with preference given to students from the High Point, North 

Carolina area, for a value of approximately $700. 

j The J. B. Dickinson Jr. Scholarship, donated by Bonders Inc. of Dunn, North Carolina 

|n memory of John Brewer Dickinson Jr., is awarded to a rising senior accounting 

jriajor on the basis of academic excellence and professional promise. 

| The Lecausey P. and Tula H. Freeman Scholarship, donated by Mr. and Mrs. G. H. 

singleton of Raleigh, North Carolina in memory of the parents of Mrs. Singleton, is 

wailable to a freshman, sophomore, or junior whose home is within the West 

Chowan Baptist Association of North Carolina, with preference given to Bertie 

County students, on the basis of need and ability. Residents of the Roanoke 

Association may be considered for the scholarship, which is renewable on the basis of 

need and ability except for the senior year, for a value of approximately $200. 

The Charles A. Frueauff Scholarships are provided annually by the Charles A. 
Frueauff Foundation for middle-income students who Live outside North Carolina. 
Amounts vary according to need, up to $1,500. 

| The James W. Gill Scholarship, donated by Ruth R. Gill in memory of her husband 
James W. Gill, provides a scholarship for a deserving student, with preference given 
to students from Montgomery and Prince George Counties, Maryland, for a value of 
Approximately $600. 

The Eugene Basil Glover Memorial Scholarship is awarded to an incoming or enrolled 
student based on ability and need, with a slight preference given to students from 
Halifax County, North Carolina. 

The Wallace Burger Goebel Scholarship, made possible through a donation from 
Miriam M. Goebel, is based upon ability and financial need, with fust preference 
igiven to a student with an interest in literature, second preference to a student with 
En interest in history, and third preference to a student enrolled in the pre-medical 
program, for a value of approximately $400. 

The Fuller Hamnck Scholarship, created under the will of the late Everett C. Snyder 
[of Wake Forest, North Carolina in memory of Fuller Hamrick, is used to educate 
;students from the Mills Home in Thomasville, North Carolina, for a value of 
approximately $550. 

The Margate/ S. Hasty Memorial Scholarship Fund, established by Judge Fred H. 
(Hasty in memory and honor of his beloved wife, is for one or more female 
undergraduate students with good academic ability and financial need. The 
scholarship is renewable if student places in the upper third of her class. 

The Frank P. Hobgood Scholarship, donated by Kate H. Hobgood of Reidsville, North 
jCarolina in memory of her husband, is available to those who qualify on the basis of 
character, purpose, intelligence, and need, with preference given to those who plan 



44 



to enter the ministry, do religions work, become teachers, or become lawyers, tl 
preference being in the order named, for residents of the Reidsville, North Carolir 
area recommended by the deacons of the First Baptist Church of Reidsville, and foil 
value of $500. 

The Forrest H. Hollifield Scholarship, donated by Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Hollifield , 
memory of their son Forrest H. Hollifield, is awarded to upperclassmen wiii 
evidence of character and need, with preference given to natives of Rowan aJ 
Rutherford Counties, North Carolina and to members of the Delta Nu Chapter J 
Sigma Chi Fraternity. 

The George W. Kane Scholarship, established bv the George W. Kane Company J 
honor of George W. Kane, former member of the Wake Forest College Board (J 
Visitors, is a full tuition scholarship and is awarded on the basis of academic merit an 
need. 

The J. Lee Keiger Sr. Scholarship is an academic scholarship awarded annually to 
North Carolina student, with preference given to students living in the Mid-Carolin 
Telephone Company service region, for a value of $750. 

The Senah C. and C.A. Kent Scholarships are awarded to freshmen an! 
upperclassmen on the basis of leadership, academic merit, and financial neec 
without regard to race, religion, sex. or geographical origin. 

The Kirkpatrick-Howell Memorial Scholarship Fund, donated bv the Delta Nu Chaptd 
of Sigma Chi Fraternity, makes available one or two scholarships, with preferencj 
given to members of the Sigma Chi Fraternity, upon recommendation of thl 
Kirkpatrick-Howell Memorial Scholarship Board, for a value of approximately $800 
The Charles L. Little Scholarship Fund, established by Charles L. Little, is given t< 
upperclass students. Preference is given to pre-medical students from Anson Count 
and immediately adjacent counties in North Carolina who provide satisfactory 
evidence of a willingness to give serious consideration to practicing medicine id 
Wadesboro, or Anson County, North Carolina. 

The Wilma L. McCurdy Memorial Fund Scholarship is awarded on the basis o 
character, academic standing, and need, in the amount of $750 per academic year] 
Application must be made annualh. 

The Thane Edward McDonald and Mane Dayton McDonald Memorial Scholarship Fund 1 
made possible bv the late Thane Edward McDonald, professor of music, is available 1 
to a deserving and qualified music student for a value of approximately $125 

The Robert Lee Middleton Scholarship, donated bv Sarah Edwards Middleton ol 
Nashville, Tennessee in memory of her husband, is awarded on the basis o^ 
character, purpose, intelligence, and need, with preference given to the student 
planning to enter the field of literature, accounting, teaching, or the gospel ministry 
or other full-time religious work. 

The Mildred Branson Miller Scholarship Fund, donated by Mildred B. Miller of 
Atlanta, Georgia, is awarded to students on the basis of leadership, dedication, 
competitiveness, and citizenship. 

The Norfleet Scholarships, donated bv Mr. and Mrs. Eustace Norfleet of Wilmington, 
North Carolina in memory of his parents John A. and Mary Pope Norfleet. are 
available to deserving and promising students needing financial assistance for a value 
of S200. 






45 

| The North Carolina Scholarships are made available by the North Carolina General 
Assembly and are awarded on the basis of financial need to full-time students who are 
iona fide residents of North Carolina. 

I North Carolina Student Incentive Grants are available to undergraduate residents of 
Jjorth Carolina with exceptional financial need who require these grants in order to 
Jttend college, for a value of from $200 to $ 1 ,500 per year. The amount of assistance 
I student may receive depends upon need, taking into account financial resources 
tad the cost of attending the college chosen. 

\ The Benjamin Wingate Parham Scholarship, donated by Kate J. Parham of Oxford, 
Morth Carolina in memory of her husband, is awarded on the basis of ability and 
leed and may be renewed for succeeding years. 

1 The Thomas F. Pettus Scholarships, administered by the North Carolina Baptist 
"oundation under the terms of the will of the late Thomas F. Pettus of Wilson 
County, North Carolina, make two or more scholarships available each year in 
■nemory of Mr. Pettus and are awarded on the basis of merit and need, with 
>reference given to North Carolina Baptist students. 

' The William Louis Poteat Scholarships, valued at SI, 500 per year, are available to 
Heven freshmen, one from each Congressional District of North Carolina. To be 
iligible a student must be an active member of a Southern Baptist church in North 
Carolina, must be likely to make a significant contribution to church and society, and 
•nust be appreciative of the quality of education available at Wake Forest University. 
; The A. M. Pullen and Company Scholarship, granted by the A. M. Pullen Company to 
in outstanding upper division accounting major designated by the accounting 
■acuity on the basis of merit, financial need, and interest in public accounting, has a 
[alue of $750.00 

The Kenneth Tyson Raynor Scholarship, donated by friends of the late Kenneth Tyson 
Kaynor, professor of mathematics, is awarded annually by the mathematics faculty. 
iThe award is made on the basis of academic ability to an individual majoring in 
nathematics who has achieved junior standing. 

I TheOliverD. andCarolineE. Revell Memorial Scholarship Fund, created under the will 
pf the late Oliver D. Revell of Buncombe County, North Carolina, is for a person 
jreparing for the ministry or full-time religious work, for a value of $100. 
■ The Kate B. Reynolds Memorial Scholarships, donated in memory of the late Kate B. 
Reynolds, are for residents of Forsyth County, North Carolina who without financial 
«d would be unable to obtain education beyond high school. At least four scholar- 
ships are awarded, with a value up to $2,400. 

'. The Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC) Scholarships, made available by the U. S. 
Army, are awarded for academic and personal achievement. The four, three, two, 
and one year scholarships, each with an annual value of more than $5,000, cover 
uition, fees, books, and classroom materials. A monthly stipend of $ 100 is also given 
during the academic year. Recipients must participate in the ROTC program and 
naintain satisfactory academic progress. Four year scholarships must be applied for 
n the junior or senior years of high school. Other scholarships must be applied for 
, hrough the Professor of Military Science, Wake Forest University. Some preference 
s given to students of biology, chemistry, mathematics, and physics. Two year 



46 



scholarships for rising juniors are also available on the basis of academi 
accomplishment and outstanding performance at the six week ROTC Basic Camp 

The Robert Forest Smith III Scholarship Fund, donated by the Rev. Mr. and Mr: 
Robert Forest Smith Jr. and other citizens of Hickory, North Carolina in memory c 
Robert Forest Smith III, is awarded to an entering freshman who qualifies on th 
basis of need and on distinction in high school government, with preference given t 
those who plan to enter government service, and with strong preference given t 
students exemplifying positive Christian principles, for a value of $1,000. 

The Sigmund Stemberger Scholarships, donated by the Sigmund Sternberge 
Foundation, are for needv North Carolinians, with preference given t> 
undergraduate students from Greensboro and Guilford Countv, for a value o 
12,000. 

The J. W. Straughan Scholarship, donated bv Mattie, Mable, and Alice Straughan i: 
memory of their brother Dr. J. W. Straughan of Warsaw. North Carolina, wit! 
preference given to students from Duplin Countv, North Carolina who ar 
interested in pursuing a medical career, especially in the field of family practice, is fo i 
those who need financial assistance to continue their education. 

The Saddye Stephenson and Benjamin Louis Sykes Scholarship, donated bv Dr. Charles L 
Sykes and Dr. Ralph J. Sykes in memory of their mother and father, is awarded oi 
the basis of Christian character, academic proficiency, and financial need, witl 
preference given to freshmen from North Carolina, renewable for a value o' 
approximately S400. 

The Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants are available to a limited number o 
undergraduate students with exceptional financial need who require these grants t< 
attend college and who show academic or creative promise, for a value from S200 tt 
$2,000 a year. The amount of financial assistance a student may receive depend' 
upon need, taking into account financial resources and the cost of attending thl 
college chosen. 

The Tyner-Pitman Scholarship Fund, donated by Cora Tvner Pitman, makes available 
at least one scholarship for needy' North Carolina students. 

The Jesse A. Williams Scholarships, created under the will of the late Jesse A. William 
of Union Countv, North Carolina, with preference given to deserving students o 
Union County, have a value up to SI, 200. 

The James Bennett Willis Scholarship Fund, established bv Mr. James B. Willis o 
Hamlet. North Carolina, gives preference to North Carolina Baptist student 1 
interested in the ministry and Christian Education. It isayvardedon the basis of need;' 

The Maria Thornton and Miriam Carlyle Willis Scholarship Fund, established bv Jame! 
B. Willis in memory of his wife and daughter, gives preference to North Caroling 
Baptist students yvho are interested in all phases of the Ministry of Music. It i! 
awarded on the basis of need. 

The Charles Littell Wilson Scholarship, created under the will of Jennie Maves Wilsor" 
in memory of her husband Charles Littell Wilson, is for a freshman, yvitha value frorr 
$200 to $600. 

The William Luther Wyatt HI Scholarship Trust, donated by Mr. and Mrs. William L 
Wyatt Jr. of Raleigh, North Carolina in memory of their son William Luther Wyal 
III, with preference given to a male student entering the junior vear who has shoyvr 1 



47 



[n interest and an ability in the field of biology, is based on need and ability, for a 
alue of approximately $500. 

Exchange Scholarships 

1 The German Exchange Scholarship, established in 1959 with the Free University of 
ierlin, is available to a student with at least two years of college German or the 
'quivalent who hasjunior standing by the end of the semester in which application is 
nade, but who need not be a German major. It provides 750 German marks per 
honth for ten months, remission of fees, 200 marks per semester for books, and 250 
'narks per month for rent. (Interested students should communicate with the 
hairman of the Department of German.) 

The Spanish Exchange Scholarship, established in 1964 with the University of the 
\ndes in Bogota, Colombia, is available to two students for one semester's study each 
'■r one student for two semesters with at least two years of college Spanish or the 
Equivalent. It provides remission of fees, the cost of books, and the cost of board and 
ccommodations. (Interested students should communicate with the chairman of the 
)epartment of Romance Languages.) 

' The French Exchange Scholarship, established in 1 97 1 with the University of Orleans, 
'ranee, is available to a graduating senior, who receives a graduate teaching assistant- 
hip at the University of Orleans for two semesters. (Interested students should 
ommunicate with the chairman of the Department of Romance Languages.) 

Loans 

The James E. and Mary Z.Bryan Foundation Student Loan Plan is for residents of North 
Carolina enrolled full-time for a value up to $7,500 for undergraduate study. The 
imount of each loan is determined by the College Foundation, with an interest rate of 
ne percent during the in-school and grace periods and seven percent during the 
lepayment period. 

The Bushneil Baptist Church Loan Fund, established in 1945 with funds supplied by 
fie Bushneil Baptist Church of Fontana Dam, North Carolina, is for needy students. 
| The Council Fund, established in 1935 by C. T. Council of Durham, North Carolina, 
!■ for the aid of senior students. 

I The James W. Denmark Loan Fund, originated in 1875 by James William Denmark of 
])udley, North Carolina, is available to qualified students, with preference given to 
::udents from North Carolina, for an amount not exceeding $1,500 each year and 
1.6,000 during the entire period of enrollment. 

The Olivia Dunn Student Loan Fund, established under the will of Birdie Dunn of 
V'ake County, North Carolina in memory of her mother, is for worthy students. 
I The Duplin County Loan Fund, donated in 1942 by anonymous friends of the 
College, is limited to students from Duplin County, North Carolina. 
I The Elliott B. Earnshaw Loan Fund, established by the Board of Trustees, is a 
lemorial to the former Bursar. 

', The Friendly Student Loan Fund, established in 1948 by Nell E. Stinson of Raleigh, 
Morth Carolina in memory of her sister Mary Belle Stinson Michael, is for the benefit 
if worthy students who need financial aid. 



48 



The George Foster Hankins Loan Fund, established under the will of the late Colons 
George Foster Hankins of Lexington, North Carolina, gives preference to applicanl 
from Davidson County, North Carolina. 

The Guaranteed Student Loan Program makes available loans up to $2,500 fo 
undergraduate students. Aggregate undergraduate sums may not exceed $12,500 
but may be extended to $25,000 for those who also borrow for graduate o 
professional study. The maximum loan per year for graduate students is $5,00C 
Loans are insured by the federal government or guaranteed by a state or privat 
non-profit guarantee agency. The federal government pays the nine percent interes 
during in-school and grace periods. Application and information mav be obtainei 
from state guarantee agencies or from the appropriate regional office of the Unites 
States Office of Education. 

The Harris Memorial Loan Fund, established by the late J. P. Harris of Bethel, Nortl 
Carolina in memory of his first wife Lucy Shearon Harris and his second wife Luc- 
Jones Harris, is for students who have demonstrated abilitv to applv educations 
advantages to the rendition of enriched and greater Christian service in life and whi 
require financial assistance in order to prevent disruption of their education. 

The Edna Tyner Langston Fund, established in 1942 bv Dr. Henry J. Langston o 
Danville, Virginia in memory of his wife, is available to a student agreed upon by th< 
donor and the College. 

The National Direct Student Loan Program makes available loans up to $2,500 per yea 
for students in need of financial assistance with an interest rate of five percent 
These are examples of typical repavment schedules: 



regate Loan 


Quarterly 


Amount of 


Total Interest 


Total 




Payments 


Pavment 


Paid 


Pavment 


$2,500 


35 


$ 90.00 


S 590.22 


$3,090.22 


5,000 


40 


159.61 


1,384.27 


6,384.27 


7,500 


40 


239.41 


2,076.44 


9,576.44 



Aggregate undergraduate sums mav not exceed $3,000 for the first two vears o 
$6,000 for four years, but may be extended to $12,000 for those who also borrow fo 
graduate or professional studv. with an interest rate of five percent. 

The North Carolina Insured Student Loan Program makes available loans up to $2,501 
per year for legal residents enrolled full-time. Aggregate undergraduate sums ma 
not exceed $12,500 but may be extended to $25,000 for those who also borrow fol 
graduate or professional studv. The maximum loan each vear may not exceed $2,50(1 
for undergraduates or $5,000 for graduates or professional students. Loans an 
insured bv the North Carolina State Education Assistance Authority and are pro' 
cessed by the College Foundation. Under certain conditions the United States Offic 
of Education pavs the nine percent interest during the in-school and grace periods 

The Watts Norton Loan Fund, established in 1949 by L. Watts Norton of Durham 
North Carolina, is for worthy students enrolled in the Department of Religion whi 
need financial assistance. 

The Powers Fund, established in 1944 by Dr. Frank P. Powers of Raleigh, Nortl 



49 



arolina in memory of his parents Frank P. and Effie Reade Powers, is for the benefit 

if needy students, with preference given to orphans. 
The Grover and Addy Raby Loan Fund, established in 1945 by Dr. J. G. Raby of 
arboro, North Carolina in memory of his parents, gives preference to applicants 

rom the First Baptist Church of Tarboro, 

I The James F. Slate Loan Fund, established in 1908 by J. F. Slate of Stokes County, 

iS'orth Carolina, is available for ministerial students who have been licensed to 

preach. 

Concessions 

I North Carolina Legislative Tuition Grants. The North Carolina General Assembly 
arovides yearly grants to all legal residents of North Carolina. To be eligible a student 
must be enrolled for at least fourteen credits each semester (by the tenth day of 
classes) and complete a Residency Form 100. The student must not have received a 
pachelor's degree previously. To receive the grant, a student must also complete an 
VICLTG application and return it to the Financial Aid Office. 

j Ministerial students receive a $600 concession per year if they (1) have a written 
recommendation or license to preach from their own church body and (2) agree to 
-epay the total amount, plus four percent interest, in the event that they do not serve 
jive years in the pastoral ministry within twelve years of attendance in the College. 

Children and spouses of pastors of North Carolina Baptist churches receive a S600 
:oncession per year if thev are the children or spouses of (1) ministers, (2) 
iriissionaries of the Southern Baptist Foreign Mission Board, (3) officials of the 
baptist State Convention of North Carolina, or (4) professors in North Carolina 
Baptist colleges or universities. Pastors themselves are also eligible. 
j Children of other ministers who are not eligible for the above concession receive a 
J 150 concession per year if their parent makes a living chiefly by the ministry and 
hey have a demonstrated need. 

Rehabilitation students receive a concession up to $300 per year if they (1) have a 
etter of approval from the North Carolina Division of Vocational Rehabilitation and 
)2) file for the concession. 

Other Financial Aid 

I The College Work/Study Program On Campus makes available on-campus employment 

[0 students who show evidence of financial need. Students work during the academic 

i/ear for campus minimum wage or above, at an average often to fifteen hours per 

week, in the Z. Smith Reynolds Library, Reynolda Hall, College Union, Reynolda 

Gardens, and other places on campus. 

!j Church Choir Work Grants, given by the College and Wake Forest Baptist Church to 

mcourage outstanding music students, are awarded on the basis of talent, reliability, 

ind interest in the Church on the recommendation of the music committee of the 

Church and the Department of Music, for the value of $300. (Interested students 

.hould communicate with the chairman of the Department of Music.) 

| The Ministerial Aid Fund, established in 1897 by the estate of J. A. Melke, is available 



50 



to pre-ministerial students on a loan or grant program on the basis of merit and need 
and particularly in the case of grants, academic achievement. 

Student/Student Spouse Employment is possible for part-time, on-campus and off- 
campus work, for a recommended maximum of twenty hours per week for full-time 
students. Summer employment may also be available. (Interested students should 
communicate with the Office of Placement and Career Development.) 

Veteran Benefits are administered by the Office of the Veterans Administration in 
the Federal Building at 251 North Main Street in Winston-Salem. Records ol ; 
progress are kept by this institution on veteran and non-veteran students alike 
Progress records are furnished the students, veterans and non-veterans alike, at the 
end of each scheduled school term. 




John Williard, vice president and treasurer 



51 



Special Programs 



For students of special ability or interest and for students who can take advantage 
f off-campus study opportunities, the College offers a variety of programs. These 
kre in addition to combined courses of study in departments in the College and the 
pre-professional curricula described in this bulletin. 

I 

Honors Study 

For highly qualified students, a series of interdisciplinary honors courses is de- 
scribed under Courses of Instruction. Under the supervision of the Coordinator of the 
Honors Program, students participate in three or more honors seminars during the 
freshman, sophomore, and junior years. Those who complete four seminars with a 
superior record and who are not candidates for departmental honors may complete a 
final directed study course. With a superior record in that course and a grade point 
average of 3.0 in all work, a student may be graduated with "Honors in the Arts and 
Sciences." 

For students especially talented in individual areas of study, most departments in 
the College offer special studies leading to graduation with honors in a particular 
discipline. The minimum requirement is a grade point average of 3.0 in all work and 
:3.3 (or higher in some areas) in the major. Other course, seminar, and research 
requirements vary according to the department concerned. 

Open Curriculum 

For students with high motivation and strong academic preparation, the Open 
Curriculum provides the opportunity to follow a course of study planned within the 
framework of a liberal arts education but not necessarily fulfilling all basic and 
divisional requirements for the degree. Under the Committee on Open Curriculum 
a limited number of students is selected before or during the freshman year by 
previous record of achievement, high aspirations, ability in one or more areas of 
study, strength of self-expression, and other special talents. The course of study for 
the degree is designed by the student and his or her adviser. 

Residential Language Centers 

For students prepared to speak French, German, or Spanish on a regular basis with 
other students studying the same language, the Gravlvn Estate near campus is the site 
of three residential centers, each coordinated by a member of the Department of 
Romance Languages or the Department of German. Such students attend regular 
classes on the campus. 

Foreign Area Studies 

The Foreign Area Studies program enables students who wish to do so to choose an 
interdisciplinary concentration in the language and culture of a foreign area. Such a 
concentration may include courses in the major and also in the minor field, if a minor 



52 

is chosen. Foreign Area Studies do not replace majors or minors; they mav well 
supplement either or both. Programs currently available are: East European Studies, 
German Studies, Italian Studies, Latin American Studies, and Spanish Studies. It is'l 
likelv that other programs will be added in the near future. A faculty adviser 1 - 
coordinates each Foreign Area Studies program and advises interested students. For 
current information about advisers and programs, students should consult the office 
of the Dean of the College. 

Study at Salem College 

For full-time students. Wake Forest and Salem College share a program of ex- 
change credits for courses taken at one institution because they are not offered at the 
other. An application must be approved bv the academic adviser and the Dean of the 
College or the Dean of the School of Business and Accountancy. Except in courses of 
private instruction, there is no additional cost to the student. Grades and grade point; 
earned at Salem College are evaluated as if they were earned at Wake Forest. 

Summer Study 

For full-time students, courses taken in the summer at another college or universi- 
ty require the advance approval of the chairman of the department concerned and 
the Registrar. Courses taken elsewhere on the semester hour plan are computed as 
transfer credit at 1.125 credits for each approved semester hour. 

In addition to regular courses, a number of special summer programs for credit 1 
are described in the bulletin of the summer session. 

Transfer Credit 

All work attempted in other colleges and universities is to be reported to the 
Registrar of Wake Forest University. Students wishing to receive transfer credit foi 
work satisfactorily completed elsewhere must obtain faculty approval, preferably in 
advance. Students should be aware that the minimum grade point average (2.0) for 1 
graduation is computed on all work attempted in Wake Forest College and the Schoo 1 
of Business and Accountancy, and is also computed on all work attempted in al. 
accredited colleges and universities. 

Opportunities for Study Abroad 

London 

A program of study is offered each semester at Worrell House, the University' 
residential center near Regent's Park in London. Courses typically encompas; 
aspects of the art, theatre, literature, and history of London and Great Britain. (Seej 
for example. Art 2320: English Art, Hogarth to the Present, and History 2260: Histon o 
London, in the course listings of those departments.) Each term a different member o 
the faculty serves as the director of the program, which accommodates sixteei 
students. Further information mav be obtained in the Office of the Provost. 



53 



Venice 

For students wishing to spend a semester in Italy, a program of study is available at 
asa Artom, the University's residential center on the Grand Canal in Venice. Under 
brious members of the faculty, approximately twenty students focus on the heritage 
nd culture of Venice and Italy. (Courses offered usually include Art 2693: Venetian 
lenaissance Art, Italian 2213: Spoken Italian, and other courses offered by the faculty 
lember serving as director.) Students selected for the Venice program are normally 
equired to have completed elementary training in Italian. Limited scholarship aid is 
mailable to one or two students each semester to assist with expenses. Further 
lformation may be obtained in the Office of the Provost. 

France 

I For students wishing to study in France, arrangements are made for a semester's 
ustruction at the University of Dijon. Under a faculty residential adviser from the 
department of Romance Languages, courses are taken at the University of Dijon by 
udent groups of varying levels of preparation. (A major in French is not required, 
tit French 221 or its equivalent is recommended.) 

Spain 

I For students wishing to study in Spain, arrangements are made for a semester's 
instruction at the University of Salamanca. Under a faculty residential adviser from 
ie Department of Romance Languages, courses are taken at the University of 
ilamanca by student groups of varying levels of preparation. (A major in Spanish is 
ipt required, but Spanish 221 or its equivalent is recommended.) 

India 

I For students who can spend a semester in India, arrangements are made for 
instruction in an Indian college or university and travel in the country for a period of 
oout three months. (Written approval from the Dean of the College is necessary for 
Billing basic, divisional, or major requirements.) 

Independent Study 

I For students who wish to spend one or more semesters in an approved college or 
hiversity abroad, arrangements must be made with the chairman of the department 
[the major and the Dean of the College. An approved application for study abroad 
lust also be filed with the Registrar. Up to thirty-six credits for a full-year program 

ay be granted by the college upon satisfactory evaluation of the work taken, but this 
i edit is not guaranteed. Students not on a College program must applv for readmis- 
hn to the University. Credit is computed as transfer credit at 3.375 credits for three 
Improved semester hours taken abroad. 

|' In addition, the Independent Study Program of the Experiment in International 
Iving is recognized by the College. To participate in this program a student must be 

gularly enrolled and plan to return to the College after study abroad, and arrange- 



54 



ments must be made with the chairman of the department of the major and the Dea 
of the College. Up to fourteen credits for a one-semester program may be grante' 
upon evidence of satisfactory completion of work taken, but this is subject to evaluE 
tion by the Dean of the College. 




55 

Requirements for Degrees 

Degrees Offered 

The College offers undergraduate programs leading to the Bachelor of Arts and 
iachelor of Science degrees. The Bachelor of Arts degree is conferred with a major 
n anthropology, art, biology, chemistry, classical studies, economics, English, 
French, French-Spanish, German, Greek, history, Latin, music, philosophy, phvsics, 
politics, psychology, religion, sociology, Spanish, or speech communication and 
heatre arts. The Bachelor of Science degree is conferred with a major in chemistry, 
nathematical economics, mathematics, physical education, or physics. The Bachelor 
>f Arts degree is available with a major in intermediate education or education with a 
tate teacher's certificate in social studies, and the Bachelor of Science degree is 
ivailable with a major in education with a state teacher's certificate in science. The 
Iachelor of Science degree may be conferred in combined curricula in dentistry, 
'ngineering, forestry and environmental studies, medical sciences, medical technol- 
igy, and the physician assistant program. The School of Business and Accountancy 
iffers undergraduate programs leading to the Bachelor of Science degree with a 
najor in accountancy or business. (See page 163 of this Bulletin.) 

A student who receives the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree may not 
hereafter receive the other of the two degrees. 



General Requirements 

: Students in the College have considerable flexibility in planning their course of 

itudy. Except for two semesters of required physical education, only three specific 
ourses are required, one in English composition and two in a foreign language. To 
omplete preparation for more specialized work in a major field or fields, students 
elect three courses in each of four divisions of the undergraduate curriculum: (1) 
terature and the arts; (2) the natural sciences and mathematics; (3) history, religion, 
nd philosophy: and (4) the social and behavioral sciences. Normally the basic and 
ivisional requirements are completed in the freshman and sophomore years and 
equirements in the field or fields of the major are completed in thejunior and senior 
ears. 

All students must complete (1) the basic and divisional requirements (unless 
ccepted for the Open Curriculum), (2) a course of study approved by the depart- 
lent or departments of the major, and (3) elective courses for a total of 144 credits, 
lo more than sixteen credits toward graduation may be earned from among all of 

he following courses: Military Science 110, 1 1 1, 1 12, 1 13, 1 14, 1 16, 202S, 21 1, 212, 
51, 252; Music 111-123 (ensemble courses); and elective 100-level courses in 
hysical education. 

I All students must earn a C average on all courses attempted. A student who 
ansfers work from another college or university must earn a C average on all 
purses attempted in the College and a C average on all work attempted at all colleges 
ad universities. Of the 144 credits required for graduation, at least seventy-two 



56 



must be completed in the undergraduate schools of Wake Forest University, incluc 
ing the work of the senior year (except for combined degree curricula). 

A student has the privilege of graduating under the requirements of the bulletin c 
the year in which he or she enters, provided that course work is completed within si 
years of entrance. After six years, the student must fulfill the requirements for th 
class in which he or she graduates. 

Basic Requirements 

All students must complete three required basic courses (unless waived throug 
procedures established bv the departments concerned): 
English 110 (composition) or 112 (composition and literature) 
Foreign language 153 (intermediate level) 
Foreign language (literature) 

French 213, 214, 216. 217, or the equivalent 

Spanish 215, 216, or the equivalent 

Italian 215, 216, or the equivalent 

German 211 or 212 

Russian (any literature course) 

Greek 211 or 212 

Latin 211. 212. or 216 

Hebrew 211 

Hindi 211 

No credit is given for any language course below the one recommended bv th 
department on the basis of the placement test unless the student is given permissio 
bv the Language Placement Appeals Board. 

Divisional Requirements 

All students must complete three courses in each of the four divisions of th 
undergraduate curriculum (unless exempted bv completion of Advanced Placemen 1 
requirements): 

Division I. Literature and the Arts (three courses: no more than one course from an 
one of the four groups) 

1. English literature (English 160 or 165) 

2. American literature (English 170 or 175) 

3. Foreign literature (other than the one used for the basic require 
mem) 

— Classical languages 

Greek 211, 212, 231, 241, or 242 
Latin 211. 212, 216, 221, 225. or 226 
Classics 253. 254. 263, 264. 265. or 272 

— German 211 or 212 

— Romance languages (French. Spanish, or Russian literature) 

— Humanities 213, 214, 215. 216, 217, 373. 374. 375, or 378. 



57 



Huision II. 



division III. 



Hvision IV. 



4. Fine Arts 

— Art 103 or 111 

— Music 101 or 102 

— Theatre Arts 1 2 1 

The Natural Sciences and Mathematics (three courses, selected from two of 
the four groups) 

1. Biology 111, 150, or 151 

2. Chemistry 111, 1 12 (unless advanced preparation indicates a higher 
course) 

3. Physics 101, 111, 112, 121, 122 

4. Mathematics 111. 112, 107, 108, 157 (any one; if two, any pair other 
than 108, 111, and 107, 157) 

History, Religion, and Philosophy (three courses; no more than one course 
from each group) 

1. History 101 or 102 

2. Religion (any course other than 218, 225, 237, 239, 240, 265, 266, 
270, 273, 282, 286, 287, 292, and 346) 

3. Philosophy 111, 171, or 172 

The Social and Behavioral Sciences (three courses; no more than one from 
any one department) 

1. Anthropology 151 or 152 

2. Economics 111, or 152 (note that 151 is prerequisite for 152.) 

3. Politics 113, 114, or 115 

4. Psychology 151 

5. Sociology 151 



Requirement in Physical Education 

All students must complete Physical Education 1 1 1 and one additional course 
elected from the 100-series of physical education courses. The requirement must be 
let before enrollment in additional physical education elective courses, and in any 
ise before the end of the second year. 



Proficiency in the Use of English 

: Proficiency in the use of the English language is recognized by the faculty as a 
:quirement in all departments. A composition condition, indicated by cc under the 
rade for any course, may be assigned in any department to a student whose writing 
J unsatisfactory, regardless of previous credits in composition. The writing of 
ansfer students is checked during the orientation period each term, and students 
■hose writing is deficient are given a composition condition. For removal of a composi- 
,3n condition the student is required to take English 1 1 during the first semester for 
Ihich he or she registers following the assignment of the cc. Removal of the deficien- 
'• is prerequisite to graduation. 



58 



Completion of Lower Division Requirements 

The basic and divisional course requirements are to be completed, where possibl; 
bv the end of the sophomore year. Some students will find it necessary to postpo^ 
some of these requirements until the junior year in order to begin certain coursj 
essential to the major field; but a minimum of three courses from among tl 
requirements must appear on the student's program each semester until such r 
quirements have been met. 

No course requirements may be set aside or replaced by substitutes except throuj; 
regular procedures already established bv the faculty, or through a specific vote' 
the faculty in regular session. 

Admission to the Upper Division 

The work in the lower division is intended to give the student an introduction I 
the various fields of knowledge and to lay the foundation for concentration in 
major subject and related fields during the junior and senior years. 

Before applying for admission to the upper division and beginning work on tj 
major subject, a student should have seventy-two credits and 144 grade points in tJ 
lower division. In no case is a student admitted to the upper division with fewer th.j 
sixty credits and 120 grade points. 

Fields of Study in the Upper Division 

Thirty days before the end of the sophomore year each student is required I 
indicate to the Registrar and to the department or departments concerned tl 
selection of a major for concentration during the junior and senior years. Before tltj 
selection is formally approved bv the Registrar, the student must present a writtl 
statement from the authorized representative of the department or departmerj 
indicating that the student has been accepted as a candidate for the major in trj 
department. An adviser is available to assist the student in planning a course of stuJ 
for the junior and senior years. A department which rejects a student as a major muj 
file with the Dean of the College a written statement indicating the reason(s) for t 
rejection. 

A student wishing to major in business or in accountancy should make applicatr 
to the School of Business and Accountancy. (See p. 164 of this bulletin.) 

The undergraduate schools make a reasonable effort to provide ample space in t 
various major fields to accommodate the interests of students. It must be understoc 
however, that the undergraduate schools cannot undertake to guarantee li 
availability of space in a given major field or a given course, since the preferences 
students change and there are limits to both faculty and facilities. 

After the beginning of the junior year a student may not change from one major! 
another without the approval of the departments concerned. The student's coursel 
study for the junior and senior years includes the minimum requirements for t 
departmental major, with other courses selected bv the student and approved bv t 
adviser. 

At least half of the major must be completed at Wake Forest University. Studeil 



59 



:reparing for the ministry are advised to elect three courses in religion beyond the 
aurse included in the divisional requirements. 

The following fields of study are recognized for the major: accountancy, anthro- 
jologv, art, biology, business, chemistry, classical studies, economics, education, 
jnglish, French, French-Spanish, German, Greek, history, Latin, mathematical eco- 
nomics, mathematics, music, philosophy, physical education, physics, politics, 
(sychology, religion, sociology, Spanish, and speech communication and theatre 
rts. 

Maximum Number of Courses in a Department 

Within the College, a maximum of forty-eight credits in a single field of study is 
lowed within the 144 credits required for graduation. Fifty-six credits toward 
aduation are allowed in any department authorized to offer two fields of study or 
'ore. 

• These stipulations exclude required related courses from other departments, 
hey further exclude, for students majoring in English, English 1 10 and 112; for 
udents majoring in mathematics and minoring in computer science, Mathematics 
1 1 and 1 12; and, tor students majoring in a foreign language, elementary courses in 
'at language. These limits may be exceeded in unusual circumstances only by action 
the Dean of the College. 

Options for Meeting Major Requirements 

■ For purposes of satisfying graduation requirements a student must select one, and 
Sly one, of the following options which will receive official recognition on a student's 
Wmanent record : ( 1 ) a single major, (2) ajoint major, (3) a single major and a minor, 
') a double major. In addition to the options above, a student may complete the requirements 
a foreign area studies program. 

Double Majors and Joint Majors 

A student may major in two departments in the College with the written permis- 
>n of the chairman of each of the departments and on condition that the student 
•eet all requirements for the major in both departments. For administrative pur- 
ees, the student must designate one of the two fields as the primary major, which 
Ipears first on the student's record. 

'A joint major consisting of fifty-six credits in two fields of study is available in 
ftssical studies, in mathematical economics, and in French-Spanish. 

Minors 



A minor is not required. Those students, however, who select a single major — not 
~je working toward a double or joint major — may choose a minor field from 
ng the following: anthropology, art, biology, chemistry, computer science, edu- 
>nal studies, professional education, English, French language and culture, 
lench literature, German, Greek, history, Latin, mathematics, music, philosophy. 



Ipse 

c.10 

t.iona 



60 

physical education, physics, politics, psychology, religion, sociology, Spanish Ian 
guage and culture, Hispanic literature, speech communication and theatre arts. 
For details of the yarious minors, see the appropriate departmental headings in th 
section of this catalog that lists course offerings. 

Interdisciplinary Minor 

A Minor in Cultural Resource Preservation. The Department of Anthropology, Art 
History, and Sociology offer an interdisciplinary minor in Cultural Resource Pres 
ervation (CRP) which will give students preliminary training in the field of histori 
preser\ation and cultural resource management aiming at the protection and en 
hancement of archeological, historical, and architectural resources. 

The minor requires the following twenty credits: Anthropology 310, Musew 
Design and Operation; Anthropology 361, Conservation Archeology; Art 223, America 
Architecture; History 366. Studies in Historic Presentation; and Sociology 333, The L'rba 
Community. It is recommended but not required that students take some of th 
following courses: Anthropology 151. General Anthropology I; Archeology and Huma 
Evolution (may count as a Diyision IV requirement); Sociology 151, Principles c 
Sociology (may count as a Diyision IV requirement); Anthropology 356, Old Worl 
Prehistory; Anthropology 359, Prehistory of North America; Art 294. Modern Architecture 
Art 393. Practician; Anthropology 261. Museum Practicum; and History 398, Indi 
vidual Study. Students should consult the adviser for the minor in CRP befor 
declaring such a minor. Students are strongly adyised to declare their intention t 1 
minor in Cultural Resource Preservation during the first semester of their junio 
year. Successful completion of the minor in Cultural Resource Preservation will b 
noted on the student's transcript. 

Foreign Area Studies 

The Foreign Area Studies programs enable students to choose an interdisciplinai 
concentration in the language and culture of a foreign area. An area studies concer 
tration may include courses in the major and also in the minor field, if a minor i 
chosen. Foreign Area Studies do not replace majors or minors; they may we 
supplement either or both. A faculty adviser coordinates each Foreign Area Studif 
program and advises interested students. Further questions may be directed to Jo 
Reinhardt. Coordinator of International Studies. Programs currently available arc 

(a) East European Studies. Coordinator, Carl Moses (Politics) 
Russian 215 is required plus twenty-four credits from the following: Russia 
216, History 331, History 332. Politics 232, Economics 255. Anthropology 37 
Humanities 215, and Seminars, Colloquia, or Independent Studies in one of tr 
departments above. 

(b) German Studies. Coordinator, Donald Schoonmaker (Politics) 
Twelve or thirteen credits from German 1 53. 2 1 1 . 2 1 2. 2 1 7. or 220 are require! 
In addition, the student should take four courses from the following groups, ; 
least one from each group: ( 1 ) History 320 and History/German 23 1 ; (2) Politii 
233 and 273; (3) Philosophy 241 and 242. Appropriate credit in the above are^ 



61 



could be satisfied by study abroad in Germany. 

(c) Italian Studies. Coordinator, Bianca Artom (Romance Languages) 

Italian through the 215 level is required, plus three courses from the following 
groups, at least one each from 2 and 3.(1) Literature: Italian 2 1 (5, Classics 25 1 , 
Classics 272, and Religion 277; (2) Fine Arts: Art 245, 267, 268, 296C, and 2693, 
and Music 181, 201, 206, 220, and 221; (3) History and the Social Sciences: 
Classics 271, History 221, 222, 223, and 398. A semester in Venice or another 
approved course of study in Italy is also required. 

(d) Latin American Studies. Coordinator, Gregorio Martin (Romance Languages) 
History 271, Politics 236, and Spanish 216, and 223 are required, plus twelve 
credits from the following: Anthropology 305, Anthropology 342, Economics 
252, Politics 235, Spanish 219, 221, and 229. Students are asked to take either 
Spanish 227, 265, or 266 to fulfill the foreign literature requirement in Division I 
and are strongly urged to spend a semester studying in Latin America. 

(e) Spanish Studies. Coordinator, Kathleen Glenn (Romance Languages) 
History 2019, Sociology 2029, Spanish 215, and Spanish 224 are required plus 
twelve credits from the advanced courses in Spanish language and literature 
olfered by the Department of Romance Languages or from the courses offered 
at the University of Salamanca (currently these include Spanish 1829, 2059, 
2259, 2749, and Art 2029). Students are required to participate in the Semester 
in Spain program at Salamanca and are strongly urged to live at the Casa 
Hispana at Graylyn for at least one semester. 

Senior Testing 

All seniors are required to participate in a testing program designed to provide 
yective evidence of educational development and employing measures of academic 
hievement such as selected portions of the Graduate Record Examination and/or 
her tests deemed appropriate by the Committee on Academic Affairs. The tests are 
ministered during the spring semester, and relevant results are made available to 
e student for his or her information. The primary purpose of the program is to 
fovide the University with information for assessing the total educational process. 
le program does not supplant the regular administration of the Graduate Record 
lamination for those students applying for admission to graduate school. 

Combined Degrees in the School of Law 

A combined course makes it possible for a student to receive the two degrees of 
ichelor of Arts and Juris Doctor in six academic years or their equivalent instead of 
usual seven years. The first three years of the combined course are in the College 
d the last three are in the School of Law. 

A student pursuing this plan must (1) complete the basic and divisional course 
quirements and become qualified for admission to the upper division; (2) initiate 
application for admission to the School of Law and secure through the law school 
viser, who is a member of the law faculty, permission to pursue the combined 
urse plan; (3) perform thejunior year of study in the College under the supervision 
a departmental academic adviser and the law school adviser; and (4) complete at 



62 



least 1 10 credits in the College with a minimum average of C and the first full yearo 
law in the School of Law with an average sufficient to remain in the School of Law 
(Admission to the School of Law is based on the applicant's entire undergraduati 
record, Law School Admission Test scores, and other criteria, and permission t 
pursue the combined degree program does not constitute admission to the School o 
Law.) 

The last year of required college academic work must be taken in the College. / 
student who transfers from another college or university at the end of the first o< 
second vear must maintain a minimum average of C on all academic work undei 1 
taken in the College. 

A student who completes the program successfully' is eligible to receive the Bachf 
lor of Arts degree at the end of the first full vear in the School of Law; the Juri 
Doctor degree is awarded the student who, having received the Bachelor of Art 
degree, also fulfills requirements for the Juris Doctor degree. The quantitative an' 
qualitative academic requirements set forth here are minimum requirements for th 
successful completion of the combined degree program; satisfying the requirement 
of the three-vear program in the College does not necessarilv entitle an applicant t 
admission to the School of Law. 

Combined Degrees in Medical Sciences 

A limited number of students mav receive a Bachelor of Science degree with 
major in medical sciences. 

Under this plan the student fulfills the requirements for the degree by completin 
three years of work in the College with a minimum average grade of C and b 
satisfactorily completing the first full year of medicine (at least thirty semester hour< 
as outlined by the faculty of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine, with a recor 1 
entitling promotion to the second vear class. (Under current scheduling, successft 
candidates receive the baccalaureate degree in August rather than May.) At least on 
year (thirty-six credits) of the required academic work must be completed in tb 
College. 

Candidates for the Bachelor of Science degree with a major in medical science 
must complete before entering the School of Medicine for the fourth year of wor 
the basic course requirements; the divisional course requirements in Divisions I, II 
and IV; the phvsical education requirement; Biologv 111, 150, 151 (anv two courses 
Biology 312, 320, 321, 326, 351, 360, 370 (any two courses); Chemistry 1 1 1 and 11^ 
Chemistry 221 and 222; Physics 111 and 112; mathematics (one course); and ele 
tives for a total of 108 credits. 

The completion of the prescribed academic subjects does not necessarily entitle a 
applicant to admission to the School of Medicine. (All other factors being equa 
applicants who have done all their work in the College are given preference.) 

Combined Degrees in Medical Technology 

Students mav qualifv for the Bachelor of Science degree in medical technology b' 
completion of the academic requirements outlined below and by satisfactory comple 



63 

ion of the full program in medical technology offered by the Division of Allied 
rlealth Programs of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine with at least a grade of C in 
ill courses taken in the program in medical technology. At least one year (thirty-six 
redits) of the required academic work must be completed in the College. (Under 
lurrent scheduling, successful candidates receive the baccalaureate degree in August 
:ather than May.) 

; Students seeking admission to the program must file application in the fall of their 
unior year with the division of Allied Health Programs of the School of Medicine, 
jtudents are selected based upon recommendations of teachers, college academic 
ecord, Allied Health Professions Admissions Test score, impressions made in per- 
onal interviews, and work experience (not essential, but important). Students must 
.omplete the basic course requirements; the divisional course requirements in Divi- 
ions I, III, and IV; the physical education requirement; Biology 111, 150, 151 (three 
purses or equivalents); Biology 326; Chemistry 111,112, 221, and 222; mathematics 
pne course); and electives for a total of 108 credits. Desirable electives outside the 
irea of chemistry and biology include physics, data processing, and personnel and 
management courses. (Interested students should consult a biology department 
acuity member during the freshman year for further information.) 

Degrees in the Physician Assistant Program 

Students may qualify for the Bachelor of Science degree in the physician assistant 
rogram by completion of three years (108 credits) in the College with a minimum 
iverage grade of C, and by satisfactory completion of the full twenty-four month 
ourse in the physician assistant program offered by the Division of Allied Health 
jograms of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine. At least one year (thirty-six 
jredits) of the required academic work must be completed in the College. Candidates 
pr the degree must complete the basic course requirements, the divisional course 
equirements, and the physical education requirement; at least four courses in 
iology (including one course in microbiology); and at least four courses in the social 
riences (sociology, psychology, and economics are recommended). A course in 
iatistics and three or four courses in chemistry are also recommended. Applicants to 
'je program must possess a minimum of six months clinical experience in patient 
kre services. (Interested students should consult a biology department faculty 
(ember during the freshman year for further information.) 

Degrees in Microbiology 

-, Students may qualify for the Bachelor of Science degree in microbiology by 
jmpletion of three years (1 12 credits) in the College with a minimum average grade 
C, and by satisfactory completion of a thirty-two-hour major in microbiology in the 
owman Gray School of Medicine. At least one year (thirty-six credits) of the 
quired academic work must be completed in the College. Candidates for the 
?gree must complete the basic course requirements, the divisional course require- 
,ents, and the physical education requirement; Microbiology 302, 304 (or Biology 
'2), 404, and Biology 370; additional courses to complete the major will be selected 



64 

from Microbiology 401, 403, 406. 407. 408, 4 15, 4 16, 4 17, 418, Biology 32 1,374, an 
391, 394. Required related courses are two courses in physics and at least two course 
in organic chemistry. Additional chemistry and mathematics courses may be suj 
gested bv the major adviser for students progressing toward advanced work i 
microbiology. The student should contact the microbiology adviser during th 
sophomore vear to establish a program of study. Work on the major must comment 
no later than the fall semester of the junior year. 

Degrees in Dentistry 

A student may fulfill the requirements for a Bachelor of Science degree with 
major in dentistry bv completing three years of work in the College with a minimui 
average grade of C, and by satisfactorilv completing the first two years of work in or 
of certain approved dental schools designated bv the University, with a recoi 
entitling advancement to the third year class. 

For this degree the requirements in the College are the same as those for tl 
degree with a major in medical sciences. 

Degrees in Engineering 

The college cooperates with North Carolina State University and other enginee 
ing schools in offering a broad course of study in the arts and sciences combined wi 
specialized training in engineering. A program for outstanding students covers fi 
years of studv. including three initial years in the College and two full years 
technical training in one of the fields of engineering. (Depending upon the fie 
chosen, it mav be advisable for a student to attend the summer session in tl 
engineering school after transfer.) Upon successful completion of the five years 
study, the student receives the degree of Bachelor of Science from the University ai 
the degree of Bachelor of Science in one of the specialized engineering fields fro 
the engineering school. 

The curriculum for the first three years must include the basic and division 
requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree. Suggested courses for the fres 
man vear are English 1 10 and 160 (or a foreign literature); foreign language cours 
211, 215, or 216; Mathematics 111. 112; Phvsics 121. 122; and Physical Educatk 
111. 112. Suggested courses for the sophomore year are English 170 (or a foreij 
literature); Philosophy 111; Mathematics 113 or 251; Physics 141, 161, and 162; at 
Chemistry 111, 112. Suggested courses for the junior vear are a history course 
religion course, Mathematics 311, and Economics 151. 152. 

This rigorous curriculum demands special aptitude in science and mathemati< 
Electives are chosen in consultation with the chairman of the Department of Phvsii 

Degrees in Forestry and Environmental Studies 

The College cooperates with the Duke University School of Forestry and Enviro 
mental Studies to offer students interested in these areas the possibility of earnii 
both bachelor's and master's degrees within five years. For details about the progra 
students should consult a faculty member in the Department of Biology. 



66 

Courses of Instruction 



Plans of study, course descriptions, and the identification of instructors apply to the academi 
year 1981—82, unless otherwise noted, and reflect official faculty action through March S 
1982. 

The University resewes the right to change programs oj study, academic requirements' 
assignment of lecturers, or the announced calendar without prior notice. 

Odd-numbered courses are normally taught in the fall, even-numbered in thi 
spring. Exceptions are noted after course descriptions. Number of credits is shown 
by numerals immediately after the course title — for example, (3) or (3,3). Thi, 
symbols P — and C — followed by course numbers or titles are used to show prereq 
uisites and corequisites in the department. 

Courses 101-199 are primarily for freshmen and sophomores; courses 200-291 
are primarily for juniors and seniors; courses 301—399 are for advanced under 
graduates and graduate students. (Other graduate courses are described in th-* 
Bulletin of the Graduate School; a complete listing of summer courses is in thi 
Bulletin of the Summer Session.) 

Anthropology 

Stanton K. Tefft, Chairman 

Professors E. Pendleton Banks, Stanton K. Tefft 

Associate Professors David K. Evans, J. Ned Woodall 

Assistant Professor David S. Weaver 

Curator/Instructor, Museum of Man, Janine B. Cutchin 

Adjunct Assistant Professor Jay R. Kaplan 

Visiting Lecturer, Gayle S. Russell 

A major in anthropology requires a minimum of thirty-six credits and mus 
include Anthropology 151, 152, 340, 380, 388, and either 356 or 359. 

Students are encouraged but not required to enroll in a course offering intensive 
field research training. However, only four credits from Anthropology 381, 382 anc 
four credits from Anthropology 383, 384 may be used to meet major requirements 
Additional courses are counted within the limits specified for a single field of study.' 

A minimum grade point average of 2.0 in anthropology courses is required at thi 
time the major is declared. A minimum grade point average of 2.0 in all anthropology 
courses is required for graduation. 

A minor in anthropology requires twenty-four credits and must include Anthro 
pologv 151, 152, and 340. Minors will not receive credit for Anthropology 388, 398 
or 399. Only .four credits from Anthropology 207, 305, 365, 383, and 384 may b< 
used to meet minor requirements and departmental permission must be obtained fo J 
minor credit in these courses. 

To be graduated with the designation "Honors in Anthropology," highly qualifiec 
majors are invited to apply to the department for admission to the honors program 1 
They must complete a senior research project, document their research, and satisfac 
torilv defend their work in an oral examination. For additional information member 1 
of the departmental faculty should be consulted. 



67 



,51. General Anthropology I: Archeology and Human Evolution. (4) Origin and 
volution of man with a focus on human biological and sociocultural change during 
jie Plio-Pleistocene. (Credit will not be granted for both Anthropology 151 and 
inthropology 162.) 

52. General Anthropology II: Cultural Anthropology. (4) A cross-cultural analysis 
f human institutions with a survey of major theories explaining cultural variety and 
luman nature. (Credit will not be granted for both Anthropology 152 and Anthro- 
pology 341.) 

07. Mountain Folklore in North Carolina. (4) The role folklore plays in all human 
ultures in general and in the culture of the mountain people of Western North 
Carolina in particular. Field trips to mountain counties conducted. Usually offered in 
ummer. P — Permission of instructor. 

60. Archeological Laboratory Practicum. (2) Instruction in artifact cleaning, pre- 
erving, cataloging, and analysis; preparation of museum exhibits; familiarization 
/ith darkroom procedures; drafting and report preparation. P — Permission of 
istructor. 

61. Museum Practicum. (3) Designed to give the student practical experience while 
-orking at the Museum of Man in six basic areas of museum operation: administra- 
on, research, curatorial duties, conservation, exhibition design, and education. 
' — Permission of instructor. 

62. Physical Anthropology Practicum. (2) Practical experience in current prob- 
ems in physical anthropology. P — Anthropology 151. 

05. Conflict and Change on Roatan Island (Honduras). (4) Readings and field 
esearch focusing upon the barriers and processes of sociocultural and technological 
hange in a heterogeneous island community. Usually offered in summer. P — 
mthropology 151 or Anthropology 152 and permission of instructor. 

.10. Museum Design and Operation. (4) The principles of museum design and 
iperation through lectures, readings, workshops with visiting experts in the field, 
nd field trips to neighboring museums (possibly to Washington, D.C.). Students 
lave an opportunity to put some of the principles in practice by planning and 
[esigning exhibits in the Museum of Man. P — Permission of instructor. 

21. The Anthropology of Art. (4) The arts (primarily visual) in folk and tribal 
ultures from comparative, structural, and functional points of view. P — Permission 
f instructor. 

,40. Images of Man: Perspectives on Anthropological Thought. (4) A study and 
valuation of the major anthropological theories of man and society, including 
|Ultural evolutionism, historical particularism, functionalism, structuralism, cultural 
jcology, and cultural materialism. The relevance and significance of these theories to 
lodern anthropology are discussed. P — Anthropology 151 and Anthropology 152, 
( nd sophomore or junior standing, or permission of instructor. 

42. Tradition and Conflict in Latin America. (4) Socio-cultural perspectives on 



68 



contemporary problems in Latin America and the Caribbean. P — Anthropology 
or Anthropology 152 or permission of instructor. 

343. Socio-cultural Development in the Third World. (4) Analytical survey if 
problems facing Third World nations and the application of anthropology in chaJe 
conflict situations today. P — Anthropology 151 or Anthropology 152 or permissn 
of instructor. 



344. Medical Anthropology. (4) The impact of Western medical practices and the y 
on non-Western cultures and anthropological contributions to the solving of we'd 
health problems. P — Anthropology 151 or permission of instructor. 

351. Physical Anthropology. (4) Introduction to biological anthropology; hurin 
biology, evolution, and variability. P — Anthropology 151. 

352. Laboratory Methods in Physical Anthropology. (1) Basic methods utilizecv 
physical anthropologists to gather data, such as blood grouping, measurenvt, 
dermatoglvphics, and dental castings. Lab — two hours. P — Permission of instruc '■. 

353. Peoples and Cultures of Africa. (4) The ethnology and prehistory of Ne'o 
Africa south of the Sahara. P — Anthropology 151 or Anthropology 152. 

354. Primitive Religion. (4) The worldview and values of non-literate culture.is 
expressed in myths, rituals, and symbols. P — Anthropology 151 or Anthropolv 
152. 

355. Language and Culture. (4) An introduction to the relations between lang^e 
and culture, including methods for field research. P — Anthropology 151 or Anth- 
pology 152. 

356. Old World Prehistory. (4) Survey of Old World prehistory, with particiir 
attention to geological and climatological events affecting culture change. - 
Anthropology 151 or permission of instructor. 

358. The American Indian. (4) Ethnology and prehistory of the American Indii. 
P — Anthropology 151 or Anthropology 152. 

359. Prehistory of North America. (4) The development of culture in North Arr'- 
ica as outlined by archeological research, with an emphasis on paleoecology ;d 
sociocultural processes. P — Anthropology 151 or permission of instructor. 

360. Archeology of the Southeastern United States. (4) A study of human adaptatn 
in the Southeast from Pleistocene to the present, emphasizing the role of ecologil 
factors in determining the formal aspects of culture. P — Anthropology 151. 

361. Conservation Archeology. (4) A study of the laws, regulations, policies, pji- 
grams, and political processes used to conserve prehistoric and historic culttlil 
resources. P — Anthropology 151 and Anthropology 359 or permission of instruct:. 

362. Human Ecology. (4) The relations between man and the inorganic and orgejic 
environments as mediated by culture; laboratory experience with aerial photou- 
phy and other remote sensing techniques. P — Anthropology 151 or AnthropoL 
152 or permission of instructor. 

364. Human Osteology. (4) A survey of human skeletal anatomy and analvs, 



69 



mphasizing archeological and anthropological applications. P — Anthropology 151 
nd permission of instructor. 

65. Field Research in Physical Anthropology. (2, 3, or 4) Training in techniques 
jr the study of problems of physical anthropology, carried out in the field. Usually 
ffered in the summer. P — Permission of instructor. 

66. Human and Non-Human Evolution. (4) Investigation of primate and human 
ivolution, both in anatomy and in behavior. P — Anthropology 151 and permission of 
istructor. 

71. European Peasant Communities. (4) Lectures, reading, and discussion on 
elected communities and their sociocultural context, including folklore, folk art, 
nd processes of culture change. P — Anthropology 151 or Anthropology 152 or 
ermission of instructor. 

80. Anthropological Statistics. (4) Basic statistics, emphasizing application in 
pthropological research. (A student who receives credit for this course may not also 
eceive credit for Biology 348, Business 201, Mathematics 157, or Sociology 380.) 

81, 382. Archeological Research. (4, 4) The recovery of anthropological data 
irough the use of archeology, taught in the excavation and interpretation of a 
Tehistoric site. P — Anthropologv 151. 

83, 384. Field Research in Cultural Anthropology. (4, 4) Training in techniques 
ar the study of foreign cultures, carried out in the field. P — Anthropology 151 or 
mthropology 152. 

85, 386. Special Problems Seminar. (4) Intensive investigation of current scientific 
esearch within the discipline which concentrates on problems of contemporary 
iterest. P — Permission of instructor. 

87. Advanced Statistical Analysis in Anthropology. (4) Principles of multivariate 
atistical analysis and applications to anthropological problems. P — Anthropology 

'80. 

88. Senior Seminar. (4) A review of the contemporary problems in the fields of 
rcheology and physical and cultural anthropologv. P — Senior standing or permis- 
on of instructor. 

98, 399. Individual Study. ( 1 , 2, 3, or 4) A reading, research, or internship course 
esigned to meet the needs and interests of selected students, to be carried out under 
! ie supervision of a departmental faculty member. 




70 



Visiting Professor Terisio Pignatti (Venice) 

Associate Professors Robert Knott, Margaret S. Smith 

Lecturers David Bindman (London), Marvin S. Coats 

Instructors Gary A. Cook, Paul H. D. Kaplan, Andrew W. Polk III 

Elizabeth A. Sutherland, Harry B. Titus Jr. 

Gallery Director Victor Faccinto 

The department offers courses in the history of art and in the practice of drawing, 
painting, printmaking, and sculpture. The program is designed to introduce stu- 
dents to the humanistic study of the visual arts. The courses are intended to increase' 
the student's understanding of the meaning and purpose of the arts and theinj 
historical developments, their role in society, and their relationship to other human- 
istic disciplines. The work in the classroom and studio is designed to intensify the 
student's visual perception and to develop a facility ina varietv of technical processes.^ 
A visiting artist program and varied exhibitions in the gallery of the Scales Fine Arts] 
Center supplement the regular academic program of the department. 

The major in art requires forty credits. For an art history major, eight courses are 
to be in art history and two in studio. For a studio art major, eight courses are to be in' 
studio art and two in art history. 

The studio art major may earn teacher certification in art education (K- 1 2) by crosSi 
registration with the Salem College teacher education program. 

A minor in art requires five courses, including at least one course in art history and 
one course in studio art. 

Any student interested in majoring or minoring in art should consult the chair- 
woman of the art department. 

Art History* 

103. Introduction to the Visual Arts. (4) An introduction to the arts of various 1 
cultures and times, with discussions of technique, style, methodology, and terms. 
May be used to satisfy a requirement in Division I. 

221. Idea and Form in Indian Art. (4) An examination of Indian ideas on the sacred 
and profane as revealed in architectural and sculptural forms in Hindu, Buddhist, : 
and Muslim art in India. 

228. Egyptian Art. (4) The art and architecture of ancient Egypt from the predynas- 
tic period through Roman Egypt. 

230. African Art. (4) The traditional arts of Africa south of the Sahara. 

231. American Art. (4) The survey of American painting from 1600 to 1900. 

233. American Architecture. (4) A survey of American architecture from 1600 to 
1900, with emphasis on the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. 



*Open to qualified freshmen and sophomores 



71 



235. The Arts in America. (4) A cultural and historical survey of the arts in America 
from early settlement to the present day. Attention is given to architecture, painting, 
isculpture, decorative arts, graphic arts, photography, and some commercial images 
as expressions of their time. 

241. Ancient Art. (4) A survey of architecture, painting, and sculpture from the 
prehistoric through the late Roman periods. 

244. Greek Art. (3) A survey of architecture, painting, and sculpture from the 
prehistoric through the Hellenistic periods. 

245. Roman Art. (4) A survey of Etruscan and Roman architecture, painting, and 
sculpture. 

:246. Greek and Roman Architecture. (4) A survey of classical architecture, from the 
Archaic Greek through the late Roman period. 

250. Twentieth Century American Art and Literature. (4) An exploration of the 
'ideas, values, and feelings found in the art and literature of twentieth century figures 
such as Kandinsky, Stevens, Picasso, and Kafka. 

251. Women and Art. (4) A historical examination of the changing image of women in 
art and the role of women artists. 

252. Medieval Art. (4) A survey of painting and sculpture in Europe from 400 to 
1400. 

253. Medieval Architecture. (4) A survey of architecture from the time of Constan- 
tine to the beginning of the Italian Renaissance. 

254. Romanesque Sculpture. (4) An examination of the re -emergence and develop- 
ment of sculpture in Western Europe during the period 1000-1 150. 

'256. History of Books and Printing. (2-4) An examination of the development of the 
book from the invention of printing to the present. 

257. Printing on the Hand Press. (4) A study of the history of printing and books 
icombined with the practical experience of learning the art and craft of printing. The 
objectives of the course are to provide a basis for the appreciation of fine printing and 
to allow the student an opportunity to learn the techniques of hand printing. 
P — Permission of instructor. 

266. Art in the Age of Discovery. (4) An exploration of the visual imagery which 
.recorded the expansion of Western civilization, and the active role which art played 
; in that expansion, from Marco Polo and Giotto to Captain Cook and Tiepolo (c. 
. 1300 -c. 1775). 

267. Early Italian Renaissance Art. (4) An introduction to the painting, sculpture, 
and architecture of Italy from 1250 to 1500, with a concentration on the arts in 
Florence of the fifteenth century. 

268. Italian High Renaissance and Mannerist Art. (4) A study of the arts in Italy of 
the sixteenth century, with emphasis on the achievement of Leonardo da Vinci, 
Raphael, Michelangelo, Giorgione, and Titian, and the dissolution of Renaissance 



72 

idealism in the art of the early Mannerists. 

270. Northern Renaissance Art. (4) A survey of painting, sculpture, graphic art, and] 
patronage in Northern European art from 1300 to the death of Durer in 1528. 

271. Studies in French Art. (2) Lectures and field trips in French painting, sculpture 
and architecture, concentrating on the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Offered 
in Dijon. 

272. Baroque Art. (4) A survey of European painting and sculpture from 1600 tol 
1700. 

275. History of Landscape Architecture. (4) Study of garden design, beginning with 
Roman gardens and continuing through the creation of public parks in the 
nineteenth century. 

281. Modern Art to 1900. (4) A survey of European painting and sculpture from- 
1700 to 1900, emphasizing the nineteenth century. 

282. Modern Art after 1900. (4) A survey of European and American painting and 
sculpture from 1900 to the present. P — Art 281 is recommended. 

283. Impressionism. (4) A detailed study of the French Impressionist painters, with 
some consideration of Impressionism in other art forms. 

284. Contemporary American Art. (4) An intensive study of American painting and 
sculpture from 1950 to the present. 

286. Studies in Twentieth Century Art: Myth in Modern Art. (3) An analysis of 
traditional Western and non-Western myths as expressed and interpreted by twen- 
tieth century artists. 

291. Individual Study. (4) A course of independent study with faculty guidance. 

292. Individual Study. (4) A course of independent study with faculty guidance. 

293. Practicum. (4) Internships in local cultural organizations, to be arranged by the 
Art Department. P/F. 

294. Modern Architecture. (4) A survey of European and American architecture 
from 1750 to the present, emphasizing the twentieth century. 

296. Art History Seminar. (4) Offered bv members of the faculty or visiting faculty! 
on topics of their choice. A paper is required. P — Permission of instructor. 

a. Ancient Art d. Baroque Art g. American Art 

b. Medieval Art e. Modern Art h. Modern Architecture 

c. Renaissance Art f. Contemporary Art i. American Architecture 

297. Seminar: Art and Politics. (4) In-depth examinations of works of art from the 
medieval period to the Russian Revolution, selected for their significant political 
content. 

2320. English Art. Hogarth to the Present. (4) A survey of English painting, sculp- 
ture, and architecture in the Georgian, Victorian, and modern periods. Slide lee- 



73 



tures, student reports, museum visits, and lectures. Taught by a special lecturer. 
\Offered in London. 

2693. Venetian Renaissance Art. (4) A survey of the art of the Venetian Renaissance, 
with slide lectures and museum visits. Offered in Venice. 

Anthropology 321. The Anthropology of Art. The arts (primarily visual) in folk and 
Itribal cultures from comparative, structural, and functional points of view. P — 
Permission of instructor. 




74 



Studio Art** 

111. Introduction to Drawing and Design. (4) Introduction to the basic elements of ! 
two-dimensional and three-dimensional design, to include drawing, painting, and, j 
sculpture. Six class hours per week. 

112. Introduction to Painting. (4) An introduction to painting fundamentals in a 
variety of contemporary styles in the oil or acrylic media. P — Art 111. 

115. Introduction to Sculpture. (4) An introduction to basic sculptural styles and 
multi-media, with emphasis on contemporary concepts. P — Art 111. 

117. Introduction to Printmaking. (4) Concentrated introduction to one or more of 
the following areas of printmaking: lithography, intaglio, and silkscreen. P — Art 111. 

211. Intermediate Drawing. (4) Continuation of Art 111, with concentrated empha- 
sis on drawing fundamentals and idea development in realistic and abstract styles 
emphasizing composition, value, line, and form. Six class hours per week. P — Art 

111. 

212. Intermediate Painting. (4) Continuation of Art 112, with concentrated emJ 
phasis on idea development. P — Art 112. Mav be repeated. 

215. Intermediate Sculpture. (4) Continuation of Art 115, with emphasis on idea 1 
development. P — Art 115. May be repeated. 

217. Intermediate Printmaking. (4) Continuation of Art 1 1 7, with emphasis on idea 
development. P — Art 117. May be repeated. 

218. Figure Drawing. (4) Introduction to figure drawing. 

219. Advanced Sculpture. (4) A course of individual study with faculty guidance.. 
May be repeated. P — Art 215. 

222. Advanced Painting. (4) A course of individual study with faculty guidance. May; 
be repeated. P — Art 212. 

223. Advanced Drawing. (4) A course of individual study with faculty guidance. May 
be repeated. P — Art 211. 

229. Advanced Printmaking. (4) A course of individual study with faculty guidance. i 
P — Art 217. May be repeated. 

295. Studio Seminar. (2, 4) Offered bv members of the faculty or visiting faculty on! 
topics of their choice and related studio activities. P — Permission of instructor. 



Asian Studies 

Balkrishna Govind Gokhale, Director 

The Asian Studies program, established in 1960 with financial assistance from the 
Marv Reynolds Babcock Foundation, is interdisciplinary in its nature and involves 



**Prerequisites may be waived with permission of instructor. 



75 

the cooperation and resources of several departments in the humanities and social 
sciences. Its objectives are to broaden the traditional curriculum with the infusion of 
a systematic knowledge and understanding of the culture of Asia. 

Asian Studies 211, 212. Asian Studies. (4, 4) Asian thought and civilization. Some 
dominant themes in Asian thought and their influence on Asian civilizations. 

Art 221. Idea and Form in Indian Art. (4) An examination of Indian ideas on the 
sacred and profane as revealed in architectural and sculptural forms in Hindu, 
Buddhist, and Muslim art in India. 

Chinese 111, 112. Elementary Chinese. (4, 4) Emphasis on the development of 
listening and speaking skills in Mandarin. Brief introduction to the writing system 
and to basic sentence patterns. Lab — one hour. 

Hindi 111,112. Elementary Hindi. (4, 4) Attention mainly to basic Hindi grammar, 
vocabulary building, simple composition, and conversation. Lab — one hour. 

Hindi 153. Intermediate Hindi. (4) Advanced practice in Hindi composition and 
conversation and introduction to literary Hindi. Lab — one hour. P — Hindi 111, 112, 
or equivalent. 

Hindi 211. Hindi Literature. (4) Reading and translation of selected texts in prose 
and poetry and journalistic Hindi. Lab — one hour. P — Hindi 153. 

History 341. Southeast Asia from 151 1 to the Present. (4) A survey of the history and 
culture of Southeast Asia under Western colonial systems, with special reference to 
economic, social, and cultural developments, the rise of nationalism, and the emer- 
gence ot new nation-states. 

History 342. The Middle East from Suleiman the Magnificent to the Present. (4) 

Major subjects covered are the rise and fall of the Ottoman Empire, the Arabs and 
Persians under Ottoman hegemony, the rise of Arab nationalism, and the emergence 
of the modern Arab states and their roles in the post- World War II era. 

History 343. Imperial China. (4) Development of traditional institutions in Chinese 
'society to 1644; attention to social, cultural, and political factors, emphasizing con- 
tinuity and resistance to change. 

History 344. Modern China. (4) The Manchu Dynasty and its response to the 
Western challenge, the 1911 Revolution, the warlord era and the rise of the Com- 
munists, Chinese Communist society, and the Cultural Revolution. 

History 345, 346. History and Civilization of South Asia. (4, 4) An introduction to 
the history and civilization of South Asia, with emphasis on historical developments 
in the social, economic, and cultural life of the area. 

History 347. India in Western Literatures. (4) A one-semester historical survey of 
images of India in Western literatures, with special reference to religious and 
philosophical ideas, art, polity, society, and culture. 

History 348. Modern Japan. (4) Tokugawa era; Meiji Restoration; industrialization 
and urbanization; relations with the West; World War II; occupation; Japan in the 
jcontemporary world. 



76 



History 349, 350. East Asia. (4.4) An introduction to the social, cultural, and politica 
development of China, Japan, and Korea. 349: to 1600; 350: since 1600. 

Politics 234. Government and Politics of East Asia. (4) An analysis of the politica 
institutions and processes in China and Japan, with emphasis on the problems o 
modernization. 

Politics 245. Government and Politics of South Asia. (4) A study of the government:. : 
of India, Pakistan, Nepal, and Ceylon; emphasis on political organizations, parti| I 
structures, and subnational governmental systems. 

Religion 360. Hinduism. (4) A study of the fundamental features of the Hindi' 
tradition. 

Religion 361. Buddhism. (4) A study of the Buddhist tradition, its fundamenta 
features, and its impact on the cultures of Asia. 

Religion 364. Islam. (4) A study of the fundamental concepts of Islamic thought anci 
the historical context of its development. Both the ancient and contemporary impact] i 
of the teachings of Islam considered. 

Biology 

Gerald W. Esch, Chairman 

Professors Charles M. Allen, Ralph D. Amen, Gerald W. Esch, Mordecai J. Jaffe. 

Raymond E. Kuhn, James C. McDonald, Robert L. Sullivan, Peter D. Weigl, 

Raymond L. Wyatt 
Associate Professors John F. Dimmick, Ronald V. Dimock Jr., 
Herman E. Eure, A. Thomas Olive, 
Assistant Professors Ramunas Bigelis, Carole L. Browne, Robert A. Browne, j 

Hugo C. Lane 

Adjunct Professors Harold O. Goodman, Stephen H. Richardson 

Adjunct Associate Professor J.Whitfield Gibbons 



At the end of the sophomore year a student electing to major in biology meets with, 
a major adviser to plan the course of study for the junior and senior years. The! 
requirements for completion of the major are those in effect at the time of the 
conference, since the curriculum and departmental requirements may change slight- 
ly during the student's period of residence. All majors are required to take Biologv 
111, 150, 151, 152. Co-major requirements are Chemistry 111 and 112 and two 
additional courses in the physical sciences. 

For students declaring majors in the spring, the requirement for a major is a 
minimum of forty-one credits in biologv. The forty-one credits must include at least 
six biology courses carrying five credits. A minimum grade average of C on all 
courses attempted in biology in the College is required for graduation with a major in 
biologv. (Students declaring a major later than the spring should consult with a 
biology major adviser for the specific major requirement at that time.) A minor in 
biology requires twenty credits. 

Prospective majors are strongly urged to take Chemistry 111,112 and Biology 111, 



77 



50 in the freshman year. They are advised to take Biology 151 and Biology 152 in 
te sophomore year, as well as organic chemistry. Deviations from this pattern may 
;cessitate summer work to fit the basic courses into an orderly sequence. 
Advanced work in many areas of biology may require additional courses in 
athematics, the physical sciences, and other areas of biology. The adviser calls these 
the attention of the student, depending on individual needs. All 300-level biology 
urses presume a background equivalent to introductory and intermediate biology 
lhat is, through Biology 152). 
Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to apply for admission to the 
pnors program in biologyTo be graduated with the distinction "Honors in Biol- 
gy," they must complete a research project under the direction of a staff member 
id pass a comprehensive oral examination. 

11. Biological Principles. (5) Fundamental principles and concepts in biology. 
iab — three hours. 

50. Organismic Biology. (5) Morphology and phylogeny of plants and animals, 
ab — three hours. P — Biology 1 1 1 or permission of instructor. 

51. Cell Biology. (5) Molecular and cellular aspects of biology. Lab — three hours. 
— Biologv 111 and Chemistry 111, 112. 

52. Population Biology. (4) Population and evolutionary aspects of biologv. P — 
iology 1 1 1 or by permission of instructor. 

53. Population Biology-Laboratory. ( 1 ) Field and laboratory studies of population 
jologv.To be taken simultaneously with Biology 152. 

12. Genetics. (5) A study of principles of inheritance and their application to plants 
rid animals, including man. Laboratory work in the methods of breeding some 
enetically important organisms and of compiling and presenting data. Lab) — three 
jours. 

14. Evolution. (4) Analysis of the theories, evidences, and mechanisms of evolution. 

20. Chordates. (5) A study of chordate animals, with emphasis on comparative 
natomy and phylogenv. Dissection of representative forms in the laboratory. Lab — 
)ur hours. 

21. Parasitology. (5) A survey of protozoan, helminth, and arthropod parasites 
"om the standpoint of morphology, taxonomy, life histories, and host/parasite 
dationships. Lab — three hours. 

23. Animal Behavior. (4) A survey of laboratory and field research on animal 
ehavior. (May count as biology or psychology but not both; choice to be determined 
t registration.) 

25. Plant Anatomy. (5) A study of comparative anatomy of the vascular plants, with 
mphasis on phylogeny. Lab — four hours. 

26. Microbiology. (5)The structure, function, and taxonomy of microorganisms 
ith emphasis on the bacteria. Some immunological processes are considered. Lab — 
)ur hours. 



78 



327. Nonvascular Plants. (5) An examination of representative nonvascular plan 
with emphasis on morphologv and phylogeny. Lab — four hours. 

328. Vascular Plants. (5) A comparative survey of the vascular plants, with empha 
on structure, reproduction, classification, and phylogeny. Lab — four hours. 

331. Invertebrates. (5) Systematic study of invertebrates, with emphasis on functio 
al morphologv, behavior, ecology, and phylogeny. Lab — three hours. 

333. Vertebrates. (5) Systematic study of vertebrates, with emphasis on evolutio 
physiology, behavior, and ecology. Laboratory devoted to systematic, field, ai 
experimental studies. Lab — four hours. 

334. Entomology. (5) A study of insects, with emphasis on structure, developmei, 
taxonomv, and phylogeny. Lab — four hours. 

338. Plant Taxonomy. (5) A study of the classification of seed plants, with empha. 
on the comparative study of orders and families. Lab) — four hours. 

340. Ecology. (5) Interrelationships among living systems and their environmen 
structure and dynamics of major ecosystem types; contemporary problems in ecc 
ogy. Lab — four hours. 



; 



341. Marine Biology. (5) An introduction to the physical, chemical, and biologi- 
parameters affecting the distribution of marine organisms. Lab — three hours. ] 

342. Aquatic Ecology. (5) A course designed to cover the general principles a0| 
concepts of limnology and aquatic biology as they apply to lentic and lotic habitats.U 
major portion of the field study is centered at the Charles M. Allen Biological Static. 
Lab) — three hours. 

344. Population and Evolutionary Biology. (5) Readings and discussions of topics 
evolutionary ecology, including population dynamics, life history strategies, coej 
petition, niche theory, resource partitioning and community structure, species ■ 
versitv, and ecological successions. Lab) — three hours. 

348. Quantitative Biology. (4) An introduction to statistical methods used 
biologists, including descriptive statistics, hypothesis-testing, analysis of variant 
and regression and correlation. (A student who receives credit for this course ml' 
not also receive credit for Business 201, Mathematics 157, Sociology 380, or Anthr 
pology 380.) 

350. Physiology. (5) A lecture/laboratory course dealing with the phvsicochemkli 
functions common to multicellular organisms, with emphasis on the principles aill 
processes of nutrition, metabolism, development, and behavior. Lab — three hou; 

351. Animal Physiology. (5) A lecture and laboratory course which discusses affl 
demonstrates the principles of bioelectricity and biomechanics. Regulatory prini 
pies and the physiology of the cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal systems I 
vertebrates are covered. Lab — three hours. P — Biology 151. 

352. Plant Physiology. (5) A study of the mechanisms by which various plant systeii 
function, thematicallv structured around the plant life cycle. Lab — three hours.! I 



79 



54. Endocrinology. (4) A lecture course which explores the evolution of hormones 
id endocrine glands, and the physiology of the main endocrine systems of vene- 
rates. The last part of the course will involve group presentations of clinical case 
istories in endocrine homeostasis. P — Biology 151. 

55. Developmental Physiology. (5) The application of the principles and postulates 
:" molecular biology to the phenomenon of development in multicellular organisms 
ith emphasis on the genetic and hormonal mechanisms of differentiation, toti- 
Dtency, and morphogenesis. Lab — three hours. 

57. Cryptobiology. (4) The genetic and physiologic mechanisms of common states 
r biotic rest in multicellular organisms: quiescence, dormancy, diapause, hiberna- 
Dn, estivation, sleep, and coma. Focus will be on the relation of states of biotic rest to 
•nescence and death. 

BO. Development. (5) A study of development, including aspects of vertebrate, 
vertebrate, and other developmental systems, emphasizing the regulation of dif- 
rentiation. Lab — four hours. 

52. Immunology. (4) A study of the components and protective mechanisms of the 
lmune system. 

70. Biochemistry. (5) A lecture and laboratory course in biochemistry, including 
rinciples of biochemistry, chemical composition of living systems, intermediary 
jetabolism, enzyme kinetics, biochemical techniques, and biochemical energetics, 
lab — three hours. 

vl. Biochemistry. (4) A lecture course in biochemistry, including principles of 
ochemistry, chemical composition of living systems, intermediary metabolism, 
iizyme kinetics, biochemical techniques, and biochemical energetics. 

73. Techniques in Electron Microscopy. (5) An introduction to the electron micro- 
fope as an experimental tool in biologv. Includes instruction in common techniques 
;ed in the field and lecture on recognition and interpretation of cellular ultrastruc- 
Ire. 

»75. Regulation of Biochemical Processes. (4) An advanced biochemistry course 
(ith emphasis on processes that regulate metabolism at both the cellular and organis- 
'ial levels. Consideration will be given to molecular mechanisms as well as the 
hysiological consequences. 

•76. Icthyology. (5) A comparative study of structure/function, classification, and 
ihylogeny of fish. Lab — three hours. 

91, 392. Special Problems in Biology. (2, 2) Independent library and laboratory 
livestigation carried out under the supervision of a member of the staff. Pass/Fail or 
(>r grade at discretion of the instructor. P — Permission of instructor. 

J3, 394. Special Problems in Biology. (2, 2) Courses designed for students who 
ish to continue special problems beyond Biology 391 and 392. Pass/Fail optional, 
pt to be counted toward major. P — Permission of instructor. 

!)5. Philosophy of Biology. (4) Lecture/seminar course dealing with the rational 



80 



structure of the biologic sciences with emphasis on the reductionistic, organismic 
and teleonomic paradigms and theories of modern biology. The structure of majo 
bio-scientific theories will receive emphasis. 

397. Seminar in Biology. (2 — 1) Consideration of major biological topics througl 
intensive reading and discussions. 

398. Scientific Communications. (3) An introduction to bibliographic and graphii 
methods, including microscopv, photography, scientific illustration and writing, anc 
preparation of manuscripts. Not to be counted for credit toward degree in biology 
Open to juniors or bv permission of instructor. 

Business and Accountancy 

See School of Business and Accountancy, page 163 of this bulletin. 

Chemistry 

R. E. Noftle, Chairman 

Professors H. Wallace Baird, Phillip J. Hamrickjr., Roger A. Hegstrom, 

Harry B. Miller, Ronald E. Noftle, John W. Nowell 

Associate Professors Paul M. Gross Jr., Willie L. Hinze 

Assistant Professors Charles F. Jackels, Susan C. Jackels, Richard R. M. Jones 

Visiting Assistant Professor, Robert P. Rooney 

Instructor Margaret F. Plemmons 

The department offers programs leading to the B.A. and B.S. degrees in chemistn 
and is on the list of departments certified bv the American Chemical Society. 

The Bachelor of Arts degree in chemistry includes Chemistry 1 1 1. 1 12; or 1 13| 
114: or 118: 221. 222. 341, 342. 361: Mathematics 111; and Physics 111, 112 or it; 
equivalent. It is recommended that Mathematics 1 12 be taken before Chemistry 341. 

The Bachelor of Science degree in chemistry includes Chemistry 111. 1 12; or 1 13, 
114; or 118; 221 ,222,334,341, 342, 361.37 1.391. or 392; Mathematics 11 land 112; 
and Phvsics 121, 122 or 1 1 1, 112. Other courses which are strongly recommended 
for the B.S. degree candidate are Mathematics 113. 121 and 251 and Physics 161/ 
162. 

A minor in chemistry requires twenty-three credits in chemistry and must include 
at least one of the following courses: 323, 334. 341. 342, 361. 362. 371. The depart-; 
ment will not accept courses taken Pass/Fail to count towards the minor. 

Chemistry 231 is an elective course designed to strengthen the student's back- 
ground in analytical chemistry. Some professional schools specifically require such a 
course. 

Unless otherwise stated, all chemistry courses are open to chemistry majors on a 
letter grade basis only. Majors are also required to complete on a letter grade basis the 
related phvsics and mathematics courses, both those which are required and those 
which are strongly recommended. 

A minimum GPA of 2.0 in the first two years of chemistry is required of students 
who elect to major in the department. Admission to any class is contingent upon 



81 



satisfactory grades in prerequisite courses, and registration for advanced courses 
must be approved bv the department. Candidates for either the B.A. or B.S. degree 
with a major in chemistry must have a minimum GPA of 2.0 in their required 
chemistry courses numbered 200 or above. 

Qualified majors are considered for honors in chemistry. To be graduated with the 
designation "Honors in Chemistry," a student must complete satisfactorily Chemis- 
try 391, 392 or an independent study project approved by the department and an 
examination covering primarily the independent study project. For additional in- 
formation members of the departmental faculty should be consulted. 

Prospective majors are urged to take Chemistry 111, 112 or 113, 114 in the 
freshman year. For B.S. majors the following schedule of chemistry and closely- 
related courses is recommended: 

Freshman Sophomore Junior Senior 

Chemistry 111, 112 Chemistry 221, 222 Chemistry 341. 342 Chemistry 361 

Mathematics 111. 112 Mathematics 113, 121 Chemistry 334 Chemistry 371 

Physics 121, 122 Physics 161, 162 Chemistry 391 or 392 

Mathematics 251 



1 111, 112. College Chemistry. (5, 5) Fundamental chemical principles. Laboratory 
covers experimental aspects of basic concepts. Lab — three hours. 

113, 114. College Chemistry — Honors. (5, 5). Covers the same range of material as 
111-112 but is designed for students with a superior background in chemistry. A 
student may not receive credit for both 1 1 1 and 1 13 or both 1 12 and 1 14. Lab — 3 
I hours. P — Permission of instructor. 

118. Principles of Chemistry. (5) Fundamental chemical principles, with emphasis 
I on structural concepts. Laboratory work on experimental aspects of basic concepts. 
j Lab — four hours. P — Chemistry 111 or permission of instructor. 

221, 222. Organic Chemistry. (5, 5) Principles and reactions of organic chemistry. 
j Lab — four hours. P — Chemistry 112 or 118. 

231. Quantitative Analysis. (4) Principles and methods of quantitative analysis. 
1 P — Chemistry 112. Lecture — two hours, Lab — four hours. Offered fall and spring. 

301, 302. Elective Research. (0,0). P — Permission of instructor. Summers only. 

. 323. Organic Analysis. (5) The systematic identification of organic compounds. 
Lab — four hours. P — Chemistry 222. 

324. Chemical Synthesis. (2 or 4) A library, conference, and laboratory course. 
Lab — four or eight hours. P — Chemistry 222. 

334. Chemical Analysis. (5) Theoretical and practical applications of modern 
methods of chemical analysis. Lab — four hours. C — Chemistry 34 1 . 

341, 342. Physical Chemistry. (5, 5) Fundamentals of physical chemistry. Lah) — four 
I hours. P— Chemistry 1 12 or 1 18, Mathematics 1 1 1, Physics 111, 112, or 121, 122. 



82 

361. Inorganic Chemistry. (5) Principles and reactions of inorganic chemistry. 
Lab — four hours. P — Chemistry 341. 

362. Inorganic Chemistry. (4) Continuation of principles of inorganic chemistry, 
with practical applications to inorganic systems. P— Chemistry 361. 

371. Introductory Quantum Chemistry. (4) Introduction to the quantum theory and 
its application to chemical systems. P— Chemistry 342 or permission of instructor. 
381, 382. Chemistry Seminar. (0. 0) Discussions of contemporary research. Attend- j 
ance required of B.S. chemistry majors in the junior and senior years. 

391,392. Undergraduate Research. (2. 2) Undergraduate research. Lab— six hours. 

Classical Languages 

Robert W. Ulery Jr., Chairman 

Professor Carl V. Harris 

Associate Professors John L. Andronica, Robert W. Ulery Jr. 

Visiting Assistant Professor Bruce D. MacQueen 

The Department of Classical Languages offers three majors: Greek. Latin, and 
classical studies. Minors are offered in Greek and in Latin. 

A major in Greek requires forty credits in the department. Thirty-two of these:; 
credits must be in the Greek language. Classics 270 is also a requirement. 

A minor in Greek requires twenty-five credits: Greek 111-112.153.211 and either 
212 or 231; and Classics 270. 

For those who begin Latin with Latin 1 1 1 or 1 13, a major requires thirty-six credits i 
in the department beyond the elementary level (111. 1 12 or 113). Twenty-eight of 
these credits must be in the Latin language. For those who begin in the College with' 
Latin 153. a major requires thirty-six credits in the department. Twenty-eight of] 
these credits must be in the Latin language. For those who begin with a 200-IeyeL 
course in the College, a major requires thirty-two credits in the department. Twenty- 1 
four of these credits must be in the Latin language. 

A minor in Latin requires three 200-le\el courses in Latin: Classics 271; and one. 
additional course (three or four credits) in Greek or Latin or classics. 

A major in classical studies requires fifty-six credits. A minimum of thirty-six. 
credits of course work must be taken in the department. A maximum of forty-eight 
credits in the department may be exceeded only if a student undertakes course work 
in both Latin and Greek. The student must take a minimum of two courses at the! 
200-le\el in either Greek or Latin and the following: Art 241 (Ancient Art), Classics!! 
265 (Greek Literature). Classics 272 (Latin Literature). Classics 270 (Greek Civilization), jj 
and Classics 271 (Roman Civilization). 

A maximum of sixteen credits may be taken in the following: Art 227 (Art of thel 
Ancient Xear East). 252 (Medieval Art). 242 (Minoan and Mycenaean Art). 244 (Greek Art). j 
245 (Roman Art). 246 (Greek and Roman Architecture): History 215. 216 (The Ancientl 
World): Philosophy 201 (Ancient and Medieval Philosophy). 230 (Plato). 231 (Aristotle): ' 
Religion 317 (The Ancient Near East), 363 (Hellenistic Religions): Hebrew 111,112. 153, 1 
211. Other courses may be allowed with the permission of the department. 



83 



The requirements for certification to teach Latin in high school are the same as the 
requirements for a major in Latin. A major in classical studies serves as an appropri- 
ate part of the program of studies required for certification to teach Latin in high 
school. A student wishing to secure this certification should confer with the chairman 
of the department. 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to apply for admission to the 
honors program in Latin, Greek, or classical studies. To be graduated with the 
designation "Honors in Latin," "Honors in Greek," or "Honors in Classical Studies," 
a student must complete an honors research project and pass a comprehensive oral 
examination. For honors in Latin or Greek, at least two of the courses counted toward 
the major must be seminar courses; for honors in classical studies, at least one 
seminar course in Latin or Greek is required. For additional information members of 
the departmental faculty should be consulted. 

Greek 

111, 112. Elementary Greek. (5, 5) Greek grammar; selections from Greek prose 
writers and poets. 

153. Intermediate Greek. (4) Grammar and Xenophon's Anabasis. Thorough drill in 
syntax. 

211. Plato. (4) Selections from the dialogues of Plato. 

212. Homer. (4) Selections from the Iliad and the Odyssey. 

221, 222. Selected Readings. (3, 3) Intensive reading courses designed to meet 
individual needs and interests. 

231. The Greek New Testament. (4) Selections from the Greek New Testament. 

241. Greek Tragedy. (3) Euripides' Medea. This course includes a study of the origin 
and history of Greek tragedy, with collateral reading of selected tragedies in transla- 
tion. Seminar. 

242. Greek Comedy. (3) Aristophanes' Clouds. This course includes a study of the 
origin and historv of Greek comedy, with collateral reading of selected comedies in 
translation. Seminar. 

291, 292. Honors in Greek. (2, 2) Directed research for honors paper. 

Latin 
111, 112. Elementary Latin. (4, 4) Introduction to Latin grammar. 

113. Elementary Latin. (5) Introduction to Latin grammar. Covers material of Latin 
1 1 1 and 1 12 in one semester. Not open to students who have had Latin 1 1 1 or 112. 

153. Intermediate Latin. (5) Grammar review and selected readings. 

211. Vergil. (4) Intensive readings from iheAeneid. with emphasis on literary values. 

212. Roman Historians. (4) A reading of the works of Sallust and Livy, with attention 
to historical milieu and the norms of ancient historiography. 



84 



216. Roman Lyric Poetry. (41 An interpretation and evaluation of lvric poetry 
through readings from a wide variety of the poems of Catullus and Horace. 

221. Tacitus. (4) A reading and critical analysis of the works of Tacitus. 

225. Roman Epistolography. (4) Selected readings from the correspondence of 
Cicero and Pliny the Younger and the literary epistles of Horace and Ovid. 

226. Roman Comedy. (4) Reading of selected comedies of Plautus and Terence, with 
a study of literary values and dramatic techniques. 

241. Satire I. (3) Selected readings from Lucilius. Horace, and Juvenal. Attention^ 
given to the origin and development of the genre. Seminar. 

242. Satire II. (3) Readings from Petronius and the Ludus deMorte Claudii. Seminar. 

243. Latin Readings. (3) A course designed to meet individual needs and interests. 

250. Prose Composition. (2) 

261. Lucretius. (3) Readings from the De Rerum Natura, with attention to literary 
values and philosophical import. Seminar. 

262. Cicero. (3) Readings from Cicero's philosophical essays, with a survey of Greek 
philosophical antecedents. 

265. The Elegiac Poets. (3) Readings of Tibullus, Propertius. and Ovid, with study of 
the elegiac tradition. Seminar. 

291, 292. Honors in Latin. (2. 2) Directed research for honors paper. 

Classics 

220. Greek and Latin in Current Use. (3) A systematic study of Greek and Latin loan 
words, roots, prefixes, and suffixes as elements of English and specialized vocab 
ularies (e.g., scientific and legal). A knowledge of the Greek and Latin languages is not 
required. 

251. Classical Mythology. (4) A study of the most important mvths of the Greeks and 
Romans. Many of the mvths are studied in their literary context. A knowledge of the 
Greek and Latin languages is not required. 

252. Women in Antiquity. (3, 4) The course explores the place of women in Greek 
and Roman society, men's views of them, their views of themselves, and their 
contribution to society, through primary source readings from the ancient authors. A 
knowledge of the Greek and Latin languages is not required. 

253. Greek Epic Poetry. (4) Oral epic poetry, with primary emphasis on the Iliad and 

the Odyssey of Homer and the later development of the genre. A knowledge of the 
Greek language is not required. 

254. Roman Epic Poetry. (4) A study of the Latin treatment and development of the 
literary form, with emphasis on Lucretius, Vergil, Ovid, and Lucan. A knowledge of 
the Latin language is not required. 

263. Tragic Drama. (4) A study of the origins and development of Greek tragedy and 



85 



; s influence on Roman writers, with readings from Aeschylus, Sophocles, and 
uripides. A knowledge of the Greek and Latin languages is not required. 

64. Greek and Roman Comedy. (4) Representative works of Aristophanes, 
jlenander, Plautus, and Terence, with attention to the origins and development of 
amedv. A knowledge of the Greek and Latin languages is not required. 

,65. A Survey of Greek Literature. (4) A studv of selections from Greek literature in 
nglish translation. A knowledge of the Greek language is not required. 

70. Greek Civilization. (3) Lectures and collateral reading upon those phases of 
■reek civilization which have particular significance for the modern world. A know- 
:dge of the Greek language is not required. 

71. Roman Civilization. (3) Lectures and collateral reading upon the general 
.ibject of Rome's contribution to the modern world. A knowledge of the Latin 
.nguage is not required. 

72. A Survey of Latin Literature. (4) A studv of selections from Latin literature in 
nglish translation. A knowledge of the Latin language is not required. 

88. Individual Study. (2-4) 

91, 292. Honors in Classical Studies. (2, 2) Directed research for honors paper. 




86 



Economics 

John C. Moorhouse, Chairman 

Professors John C. Moorhouse, J. Van Wagstaff 

Associate Professor Donald E. Frey 

Assistant Professors J. Daniel Hammond, 

Richard P. Hydell, Michael L. Wyzan 

Instructor Claire H. Hammond 

The objectives of the economics program are to help prepare students for effective 
participation in the decision-making processes of society, to develop analvtical skill 
in solving economic problems, to promote a better understanding of alternativi 
economic svstems, and to provide a balanced curriculum to prepare students fo 
graduate study or positions in industry and government. 

The major in economics requires a minimum of thirtv-six credits in economics 
including Economics 151, 152, 201, and 202.* In order to major in Economics, J 
student must have earned a minimum of a C in each of Economics 151 and Econo 
mics 152. The department recommends that majors take Mathematics 1 1 1 and 157 
either to fulfill the Division II requirement or as electives. A student may offer up W 
five credits toward the thirtv-six credits required for a major bv taking one of th> 
following courses, provided that, for (c), (d), or (e), the complementary course i^ 
economics is successfully' completed. 

(a) Mathematics 112. Second semester of Calculus. (5) 

(b) Philosophy 279. Philosophy of Science. (4) 

(c) Politics 210. Policv Analysis. (4) (Economics 221. Public Finance) 

(d) History 344. Modern China. (4) (Economics 255. Comparative Economic Sys 
terns) 

(e) History 332. Russia. (4) (Economics 255. Comparative Economics Svstems) 

The remaining courses for a major in economics and courses in related fields ar 
selected by the student and the adviser. A minimum grade average of C on all course 
attempted in economics is required for graduation. 

Highly qualified majors are invited bv the department to applv for admission to th 
honors program in economics. To be graduated yvith the designation "Honors i 
Economics," thev must complete a satisfactory economics research project, pass 
comprehensive oral examination on the project, and complete Economics 281 or 28 
and Economics 288. For additional information members of the departmental facu 
ty should be consulted. 

The Departments of Mathematics and Economics offer a joint major leading to 
Bachelor of Science degree in mathematical economics. This interdisciplinarv pre 
gram, consisting of no more than fifty-six credits, affords the student an opportunit 
to applv mathematical methods to the development of economic theory, models, an 



*Ec<momics 111 satisfies the requirement for Economics 151 and 152 by permission of ti 
department. 



87 



uantitative analysis. The major consists of the following course requirements: 
Mathematics 111, 112, 113, 121, 251; Economics 151, 152, 201, 202, 203; ajoint 
^minar in mathematical economics; and three additional courses chosen with 
pproval of the program advisers. Students electing the joint major must receive 
ermission from both the Department of Economics and the Department of 
Mathematics. 
Highlv qualified majors may be invited to apply for admission to the honors 
rogram in the joint major. To be graduated with the designation "Honors in 
Mathematical Economics," they must complete a senior research paper and pass a 
bmprehensive oral examination on the project. For additional information raem- 
ers of the department faculty should be consulted. 

11. Introduction to Economic Analysis. (4) A survey of the discipline for students 
ho wish to take onlv one course in economics. Elementarv supplv and demand 
nalvsis is considered, in addition to more general topics involving the formation of 
ational economic policv. (Credit is not granted for this course and Economics 1 5 1 or 
52.) 

51. Principles of Economics.(4) A study of individual economic units in a market 
conomv, with some attention to monopoly, labor unions, and poverty. 

52. Principles of Economics. (4) Attention is focused on the functioning of the 
conomv as a whole, with particular reference to employment, inflation, economic 
rowth, and policy. P — Economics 151. 

88. Individual Study. (4) Directed readings in a specialized area of economics. 
— Permission of the instructor. 

01. Microeconomic Theory. (4) Develops the theory of consumer behavior and the 
<ieory of the firm, with emphasis on price and output determination under various 
larket conditions. P — Economics 151, 152. 




88 



202. Macroeconomic Theory. (4) A study of Kevnesian and post-Kevnesian theori 
about the determination of the level of national income, employment, and econom 1 
growth. P — Economics 151. 152. 

203. Introduction to Econometrics. (5) Economic analysis through quantitatr 
methods, with emphasis on model construction and empirical research. P-a 
Economics 151, 152; and Mathematics 157, or 121. 

204. Economic Indicators. (2) The theory, construction, and interpretation 'i 
significant quantitative indicators of economic behavior, such as the unemployme 
rate and the various price indices. P — Economics 151, 152. 

205. Seminar in Mathematical Economics. (4) Calculus and matrix methods used ■ 
develop basic tools of economic analysis. P — Mathematics 111. 112 and Economi 
201. 

221. Public Finance. (4) An examination of the economic behavior of governmer 
Includes principles of taxation, spending, borrowing, and debt-management. P-J 
Economics 151, 152. 

222. Monetary Theory and Policy. (4) A rigorous development of the theory 
supply and demand for money, plus the interrelationship among prices, intere 
rates, and aggregate output. P — Economics 151. 152. 

224. Law and Economics. (4) An economic analysis of property, contracts, toW 
criminal behavior, due process, and law enforcement. P — Economics 151, 152. 

225. Public Choice. (4) Traditional tools of economic analysis are employed 
explore such topics in political science as political organization, elections, coalitic 
formation, the optimal provision of public goods, and the scope of governmer 
P — Economics 151. 152. 

242. Labor Economics. (4) Economic analysis of wages and hours, emplovmer 
wage and job discrimation, investment in education, and unions. P — Economics 15. 
152. 

244. Industrial Organization. (4) An analysis of market structure, with particul; 
reference to organization practices, price formation, efficiency, and public regul 
tion. P — Economics 151, 152. 

248. Resource Economics. (4) The economic theory of natural resource allocatic 
and environmental quality. P — Economics 201. 

251. International Economics. (4) A study of international trade theory, balance c 
payments, foreign exchange, trade restrictions, and commercial policie 
P — Economics 201. 

252. Economic Growth and Development. (4) A study of the problems of econom 
growth, with particular attention to the less developed countries of the worl^ 
P — Economics 151. 152. 

255. Comparative Economic Systems. (4) An examination of several major nor 
capitalist economies, with special reference to the Soviet Union, Yugoslavia, and tr 
People's Republic of China. P — Economics 151, 152. 



89 

56. Urban Economics. (4) Application of economic theory to suburbanization, land 
dues, urban decay, zoning, location decisions of firms and households, and metro- 
alitan fiscal problems. P — Economics 151, 152. 

il. American Economic Development. (4) The application of economic theory to 
storical problems and issues in the American economy. P — Economics 151, 152. 

52. History of Economic Thought. (4) An historical survey of the main develop- 
ments in economic thought from the Biblical period to the twentieth century. 
.—Economics 151, 152. 

71, 272. Selected Areas in Economics. (4, 4) A survey of an important area in 
/onomics not included in the regular course offerings. The economics of housing, 
)ucation, technology, and health services are examples. Students should consult 
|th instructor to ascertain topic before enrolling. P — Economics 151, 152. 

p. Economic Philosophers. (4) An in-depth study of the doctrines and influence of 
tree major figures in economics, such as Smith, Marx, and Keynes. P — Economics 

11, 202. 

SI. Seminar in Economic Theory and Policy: Micro. (4) Microeconomic analysis of 
jntemporary issues, with emphasis on contributions to policy. P — Permission of 
structor. 

12. Seminar in Economic Theory and Policy: Macro.(4) A consideration of recent 
■velopments in macroeconomic theory with a discussion of their implications for 
blicy. P — Permission of instructor. 

;8. Economic Research. (4) Development and defense of a senior research project, 
fquired of candidates for departmental honors. P — Permission of department. 

Education 

Joseph O. Milner, Chairman 
Professors Thomas M. Elmore, John E. Parker Jr., Herman J. Preseren, 

J. Don Reeves 

Associate Professors John H. Litcher, Joseph O. Milner 

Assistant Professors Patricia M. Cunningham, Linda Nielsen, 

Leonard P. Roberge 

Visiting Lecturers Joseph Dodson, Donald L. Ellis, 

Richard I. Tirrell 

Instructor Gay S. Pitts 

Because Wake Forest University believes that the educational profession is impor- 
:it to society and that the welfare of mankind is significantly affected by the quality 
?its educational leadership, one of the important objectives of the University has 
izn and continues to be the preparation of teachers and other professional school 
::rsonnel. The University's commitment to quality in teacher education is demon- 
iated by selective admission to the program, a wide range of professional courses, 
id closely supervised internships appropriate to the professional needs of students. 
Prospective teachers either major in other academic areas and take education 



90 



courses to earn secondary certification or earn intermediate, science, or social stud 
certification as majors in the Department of Education. Certification for the prima 
grades can also be earned by intermediate majors who wish to extend their range 
teaching certification. In addition to the professional program, the departme 
provides a non-professional minor and elective courses open to all students. 

Teacher Certification. The North Carolina State Department of Public Instructk 
issues the Professional Class A Teacher's Certificate to graduates who have coi 
pleted an approved program, including the specified courses in their teachil 
field(s) and the prescribed courses in education, who have demonstrated sped! 
competencies, and who receive recommendations from the designated officials(s)! 
their teaching area(s) and from the chairman of the department or a deputy. 

Special students (those not having completed prior to graduation an approvlj 
certification program from this or another institution) are required to secure frrj 
the department an analysis of their deficiencies and a plan for completing the ClasA 
Certificate. Information about certification requirements for other states can 1 
secured from the department as assistance in planning a program to meet tl 
certification requirements of those states. 

Admission Requirements. Admission to the teacher education program normal 
occurs during the sophomore year. Admission involves filing an official applicant 
with the department, being screened by faculty committees, and being official 
approved by the department. 

Course Requirements. The approved program of teacher education requires can 
dates to complete successfully a series of professional education courses. The ex: 
sequence of professional and academic courses varies with a student's particu' 
program and is determined in conference with the candidate. For those seeki 
secondary certification the majoritv of the professional work is taken during o 
semester of the senior year. Candidates for the intermediate certificate may bef 
course work required for certification as early as the sophomore year. A cooperatii 
agreement with Salem College gives education majors the additional opportunity! 
be certified in learning disabilities. 

Student Teaching. Prerequisites for registering for student teaching include 
senior, graduate, or special student classification; (2) completion of school practici) 
and foundations of education courses; (3) an average of at least C on all course woi 
(4) an average of at least C on all courses taken in the area(s) of certification; 
departmental approval for admission to the teacher education program. 

Students are assigned to student teaching opportunities by public school offici 
on the basis of available positions and the professional needs of the student and t 
public school system. (The University does not assume the responsibility for tra 
portation to schools during student teaching.) For both secondary and intermedin 
students one semester of the senior year is reserved for the student teaching expel 
ence and the block of courses preparatory to that experience in the schools. Stude 
may not take other courses during this semester without the approval of the Direc 
of Teacher Education. 



91 

Teaching Area Requirements 

'figlish — Thirty-six credits, including four credits from courses numbered 160-1 75; 
| least sixteen credits from courses numbered 300-399; 323; 390. 
■ench— Thirty-six credits, including French 153, 2 16 or 2 1 7, 2 1 9, 22 1 , 224, or their 
(uivalents; at least eight credits in French literature beyond 217. 
\anish — Thirty-six credits, including Spanish 1 53, 2 1 5 or 2 1 6, 2 1 7, 22 1 , 223, 224, or 
,eir equivalents; eight credits from 225, 226, 227; at least four additional credits in 
erature. 

\ench and Spanish — Fifty-six credits, including French 153x, 216, 217, 221, 222, and 
:4, plus Spanish 153x; either 215 or 216; 219; 221; either 223 or 224; and eight 
edits from 225, 226, 227, or their equivalents. 

irman— Thirty-two credits, including German 153, 211, 212; eight credits from 
£rman 217, 218, 219, 220; at least twelve credits in German literature beyond 212. 
\tin — The requirements are the same as those for the major in Latin. 
termediate Education — Forty-two credits, including appropriate basic and divisional 
urse requirements; eight credits in language arts; eight credits in social studies; 
jht credits in science; eight credits in mathematics; four credits in music; four 
edits in humanities; two credits in physical education. Remaining certification 
quirements are obtained through intermediate education courses and an academic 
ncentration in one of the teaching areas of the intermediate grades. 
pthematics — Forty credits, including Mathematics 111,112, 1 13, 121, 221, 231, 332; 
Jeast eight credits from other 300-level courses. 

iisic— Forty-eight credits, including Music 171, 172, 173, 174, 181, 182, 186, 187, 
,8; Education 280, 282, 284, 289, and 291. 

tysical Education and Health— Forty-three credits, including Physical Education 220, 
jl, 222, 224, 230, 240, 250, 353, 357, 360, 363; Biology 111 and 150. 
{ ence — Ten credits each in biology, chemistry, and physics; eight credits in mathe- 
iitics; additional work in the area of concentration: biology (twenty credits), chemis- 
(twenty credits), or physics (seventeen credits). For certification in the individual 
Ids of science, the following are required: biology (thirty credits), chemistry (thirty 
pdits), or physics (twenty-seven credits). 

tial Studies— Forty-eight credits, including twenty-four credits in history, with at 
ist six to eight credits in United States history and six to eight credits in world 
iropean) history; twenty credits from politics, sociology, anthropology, or 
gnomics, with no more than eight credits in any one area; and four credits in 
pgraphy. For certification in the individual fields of the social studies, the following 
j; required: economics (twenty-four credits), politics (twenty-four credits), history 
(enty-four credits, with at least six to eight credits in United States history and six to 
bt credits in world [European] history), and sociology (twenty-four credits). 
\ech Communication — Forty-four credits, including Speech Communication 121, 
jl or 152, 153, 155 or 376, 161 , 23 1, 252 or S355, 261, and 241 or 245 or 283, 284^ 
11 two 300-level speech communication electives. 

•aire Arts— Forty to forty-two credits, including Speech Communication 121,151. 
\ 23 1 , 226, 227, 283, 284, 332 or S324, and 327 or 328; English 329 or 323 or 369; 
'/sical Education 162. 



92 



Speech and Theatre — Fifty credits, including Speech Communication 121 or 241 
245, 151 or 152, 153, 155, or 376, 161 or 227, 231, 223, 226, 252 or S355, 261, 21 
284, 321, 322. 

Education courses required for a secondary or special subject certificate aj 
Education 201 or 301 or 304, 202 or 203, 21 1, 214, 251, 291 and 383. Educatk 
courses required for an intermediate certificate are Education 20 1 or 30 1 or 304, 2( 
or 203, 21 1, 221, 222, 251, 271, 293, 295, 296, 313, and 383. A minor in education 
studies requires Education 201, 211, 303, 304, 313, and Education 393 or 214. 
minor in professional education requires Education 201 or 301 or 304, 202, or 20 
211, 214, 251, 291, and 383. 



201. Foundations of Education. (4) Philosophical, historical, and sociological fou; 
dations of education, including analysis of contemporary issues and problems. 

202 or 203. School Practicum. (2) Assigned experiences in elementary and secot 
dary schools. Weekly seminar. Pass/Fail only. 

211. Educational Psychology. (4) The theories, processes, and conditions of effe 
tive teaching/learning. P — Education 201 or permission of instructor. 

214. The School and Teaching. (4) Organization of the school system; bases 
education; the curriculum; major problems of education and teaching; the role 
the teacher; psychological aspects of teaching. P — Education 201 and permission 
instructor. 

221. Children's Literature and Reading. (4) A survey of the types of literatu 
appropriate for the intermediate grades and an inyestigation of the basic problems 
reading. 

222. The Arts in the Intermediate Grades. (4) The deyelopment of skills in mus 
and fine arts appropriate to the intermediate grades. 

223. Health and Physical Education for the Intermediate Grades. (4) The develol 
ment of physical education skills appropriate for the intermediate grade teacher ar 
an understanding of the personal and community health needs appropriate for til 
grade level. 

251. Student Teaching. (6) Observation and experience in school-related activitie 
Supervised student teaching. Pass/Fail only. P — Education 201 and permission 
instructor. 

252. Student Teaching. (2) Observation and experience in the Primary Grades K-i 
Pass/Fail. P — Permission of instructor. 

271. Introduction to Geography. (4) A study of the physical environment and 
relationship to man, including an examination of climate, soils, water resources, ar 
land forms found in various regions throughout the world. 

272. Geography Study Tour. A guided tour of selected areas to study physic; 
economic, and cultural environments and their influence on man. Backgrour 
references for reading are suggested prior to the tour. 



93 



280. Orchestration. (4) A study of the orchestral and wind band instruments, how 
tomposers have used them throughout history, and the development of practical 
^coring and manuscript skills. Offered in alternate years. P — Music 174, 184. 

282. Conducting. (4) A study of choral and instrumental conducting techniques, 
Jncluding practical experience with ensembles. Offered in alternate years. P — Music 
1 74, 184. 

284. Music Literature Seminar. (3 or 4) A survey of repertoire, including an ex- 
amination of teaching materials in the student's special area of interest. P — Music 
174, 184 and permission of instructor. 

289. Ensemble Methods. (2) A practical study of choral and instrumental techniques. 
Discussion of tonal development, administration, bibliography, choral and in- 
strumental repertoire, marching band, and instrumental problems. P — Music 101 or 
102 or permission of instructor. 

i291. Methods and Materials. (4) Methods, materials, and techniques used in teaching 

the various subjects. P — Education 201 and permission of instructor. 

, Teaching of English. Fall. 

! Teaching of Foreign Language. Spring. 

Teaching of Mathematics. Spring. 
' Teaching of Music. Fall. 

Teaching of Physical Education and Health. Spring. 
1 Teaching of Science. Fall. 
i Teaching of Social Studies.YaW. 
I Teaching of Speech Communication. Spring. 
| Teaching of Theatre Arts. Fall. 

R92. Primary Methods. (4) Classroom organization, teaching strategies, and mate- 
ials appropriate to subjects taught in grades K-3. P — Permission of instructor. 

193. Intermediate School Curriculum: Theory and Practice. (3) General principles 
f curriculum construction and teaching methods. Introduction to the use of audio- 
isual materials and equipment. 

!95. Methods and Materials for Teaching Language Arts and Social Studies. (4) A 

urvey of the basic materials, methods, and techniques of teaching the language arts 
ind social studies in the intermediate grades. P — Permission of instructor. 

96. Methods and Materials for Teaching Science and Mathematics. (4) A survey of 
tie basic materials, methods, and techniques of teaching science and mathematics in 
le intermediate grades. P — Permission of instructor. 

01. Audiovisual Education. (4) Introduction to the Field of audiovisual education; 
evelopment and application of skills in the use of instructional materials, equip- 
tent, and programs. 

02. Production of Instructional Materials. (4) Methods of producing instructional 
laterials and other technological techniques. P — Education 301. 

03. History of Western Education. (4) Educational theory and practice from 
ncient times through the modern period, including American education. 



94 



304. Theories of Education. (4) Contemporary proposals for educational theory anc 
practice studied in the context of social issues. 

306. Studies in the History and Philosophy of Education. (4) A study of selectee 
historical eras, influential thinkers, or crucial problems in education. Topic: 1 
announced annually. 

313. Human Growth and Development. (4) A study of the intellectual, emotional 
and physical components of growth from birth to adolescence, with special concerr 
for the educational implictions of this process. 

323. Educational Statistics. (4) Descriptive, inferential, and nonparametric statistica 
procedures involved in educational research. Not open to students who have taker 
Psychology 211 and 212. P — Permission of instructor. 

341. Principles of Counseling and Guidance. (4) Counseling history, philosophy 
theory, procedure, and process. Therapeutic and developmental counseling 
approaches in guidance and personnel work in education, business, and communif 
service agencies. 

383. Reading in the Content Areas. (2) The course provides an introduction t< ; 
teaching the basic reading skills at the intermediate and secondarv level; vocabulary 
comprehension, reading rate, selection of texts, and critical and interpretive reading 
Particularly stressed are diagnoses of reading problems and techniques for correct 
ing these problems in specific subject content areas. 

390. Education of Exceptional Persons. (4) A survey of the types of exceptionality 
Emphasis will be placed on characteristics, identification, educational programming! 
management, and evaluation. 

391. Teaching the Gifted. (4) An investigation of theory and practice pertinent ti 1 
teachers of the gifted. 

392. The Psychology of the Gifted Child. (4) A discussion of giftedness and creativ, 
ity in children and the relationship of those characteristics to adult superior perform;; 
ance. Topics to be covered include a history of the study of precocity, methods ant 
problems of identification, the relationship of giftedness and creativity, personaliti 
characteristics and social-emotional problems of gifted children, and the sociaj 
implications of studying giftedness. 

393. Individual Study. (2, 4) A project in an area of study not otherwise available I 
the Department of Education. Permitted upon departmental approval of petitioi 
presented by a qualified student. 

394. Internship in Education of the Gifted. (4) An intensive period of observation' 
and instruction of gifted students. Readings and directed reflection upon the class' 
room experience will be used to develop a richer understanding of such a specie 
school setting. 



95 



English 

Robert N. Shorter, Chairman 

Professors John A. Carter Jr., Doyle R. Fosso, Thomas F. Gossett, 

Alonzo W. Kenion, Elizabeth Phillips, Lee Harris Potter, Robert N. Shorter, 

Edwin Graves Wilson 

Associate Professors Nancy J. Cotton, Andrew V. Ettin, W. Dillon Johnston, 

Robert W. Lovett, William M. Moss, Blanche C. Speer 

Visiting Assistant Professors David G. Brailow, Gillian R. Overing, 

Lecturers Dolly A. McPherson, Bynum Shaw 

Visiting Lecturer Robert A. Hedin 

Instructors Cynthia L. Caywood, Patricia A. Johansson, Barry G. Maine, 

Mark R. Reynolds 



The major in English requires a minimum of forty credits, at least thirty-two of 
k'hich must be in advanced language and literature courses numbered 300 to 399. 
("hese courses must include Shakespeare, two additional courses in British literature 
lefore 1 800, one course in American literature, and, early in the major, one seminar. 
Vlajors and their advisers plan individual programs to meet these requirements and 
d include work in the major literary types. 

A minor in English requires English 160 or 165 and English 170 or 175, plus five 
|dvanced courses in language and literature. Each minor will be assigned an adviser 
h the English Department who will plan with the student a program of study. 

The prerequisite for all 300-level courses in English is any one of the courses in 
jiritish and American literature numbered 160, 165, 170, and 175, all of which are 
ffered each semester. Additional courses in journalism and writing are offered by 
ie department as related subjects but do not count toward an English major; they 
day be taken as electives regardless of the field of study in which a student majors. 
1 Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to apply in the second 
Dniester of their junior year for admission to the honors program in English. To 
raduate with "Honors in English," students must have a minimum grade point 
verage of 3.5 in the major and 3.0 in all course work and must satisfy the require- 
tents for English 388 during their senior year. Interested students may consult 
epartmental faculty members for further information. 



Lower Division Courses 

t. Composition Review. (0) A tutorial in the essentials of standard usage and the 
isic principles of composition. 

)5. English Fundamentals. (2) Training in the fundamentals of written English. 
Uisfactory completion required for entry into English 110. Admission by placement 
ply; does not satisfy the basic composition requirement. 



96 

*1 10. English Composition. (4) Training in expository writing; frequent essays baseq 

upon readings. 
*112. English Composition and Literature. (4) Training in expository writing basecj 

on the reading of literature. P — Permission of department. 

160. Survey of Major British Writers. (4) Eight to ten writers representing differeni 

periods and genres; primarily lecture. 

165. Studies in Major British Writers. (4) Three to Five writers representing diffenJ 

ent periods; primarily discussion, with frequent short papers. Limited enrollment I 

170. Survey of Major American Writers. (4) Nine to eleven writers representinjl 

different periods and genres; primarily lecture. 

175. Studies in Major American Writers. (4) Three to five writers representing 

different periods; primarily discussion, with frequent short papers. Limited enroll; 

merit. 

180. Traditions of Humanity: The Liberal Arts. (2) A study of major concepts oj 

liberal education in the Western world. 

210. Advanced Composition. (4) Study of prose models of exposition; frequenj 

papers and individual conferences. Enrollment limited. 

225. Reading Short Fiction. (2) Selected readings from the genre of short fictioi 
designed to increase students' appreciation and pleasure. 

226. Reading the Novel. (2) Selected readings from the genre of the novel designed 
to increase students' appreciation and pleasure. 

227. Reading Poetry. (2) Selected readings from the genre of poetry designed t< 
increase students' appreciation and pleasure. 

228. Reading Drama. (2) Selected readings from the genre of drama designed g 
increase students' appreciation and pleasure. 
245. Literary Approaches to Film. (2) The studv of film as a literary genre, witl! 
special attention given to narrative, theme, and structure. Students will appl 
methods and principles of literary criticism to selected films. 
299. Individual Study. (2-4) A course of independent study with faculty guidance! 
Bv prearrangement. 

Journalism Courses 

270. Introduction to Journalism. (4) Survey of the fundamental principles of news 
gathering and news-writing; study of news and news values, with some attention t 
representative newspapers. 
272. Editing. (4) A laboratory course in copy-editing, headline-writing, typography 
and make-up; practice on Video Display Terminal. P— English 270. 



"Either 110 or 112 is a prerequisite for all other courses in English unless the basic requirement is waivt 
Either course fulfills the basic course requirement. 



97 



276. Advanced Journalism. (4) Intensive practice in writing various tvpes of news- 
oaper stories, including the feature article. Limited to students planning careers in 
lournalism. P — English 270. 

278. History of Journalism. (4) A study of the development of American journalism 
and its English origins; detailed investigations of representative world newspapers. 

284. The Essay. (2) Primarily for those interested in writing for publication, with 
concentration on writing various tvpes of essays. 

Writing Courses 

285. Poetry Workshop. (2) A laboratory course in the writing of verse. Study of 
boetic techniques and forms as well as works of contemporary poets. Frequent 
Individual conferences. 

286. Short Story Workshop. (2) A study of the fundamental principles of short 
r iction writing; practice in writing; extensive study of short storv form. P — 
Permission of instructor. 

183, 384. Theory and Practice of Verse Writing. (4, 4) Emphasis on reading and 
discussing student poems in terms of craftsmanship and general principles. 

Advanced Language and Literature Courses 

J00. Seminar in the Major. (4) Selected topics in British and American literature, 
intensive practice in critical discourse, including discussion, oral reports, and short 
assays. Introduction to literary scholarship and research methodology leading to a 
documented paper. Required for all majors. 

$01. Individual Authors. (2) Study of selected work from an important American or 
British author. 

$02. Ideas in Literature. (2) Study of a significant literary theme in selected works. 

$04. History of the English Language. (4) A survey of the development of English 
.yntax, morphology, and phonology from Old English to the present, with attention 
p vocabulary growth. 

HI. The Legend of Arthur. (4) The origin and development of the Arthurian legend 
n France and England, with emphasis on the works of Chretien de Troves and Sir 
Thomas Malory. 

H5. Chaucer. (3 or 4) Emphasis on The Canterbury Tales and Troilus and Criseyde, with 
lome attention to minor poems. Consideration of literary, social, religious, and 
ohilosophical background. 

120. British Drama to 1642. (4) British drama from its beginning to 1642, exclusive 
)f Shakespeare. Representative cycle plays, moralities, Elizabethan and 
acobean tragedies, comedies, and tragicomedies. 

i>23. Shakespeare. (4) Thirteen representative plays illustrating Shakespeare's 
development as a poet and dramatist. 



98 



325. Sixteenth Century British Literature. (4) Concentration on the poetry oj 
Spenser, Sidney, Shakespeare, VVvatt, and Drayton, with particular attention t< 
sonnets and The Faerie Qiieene. 

327. Milton. (4) The poetry and selected prose of John Milton, with emphasis oi| 

Paradise Lost. 

328. Seventeenth Century British Literature. (4) Poetry of Donne, Herbert] 
Vaughan, Marvel, Crashaw, prose of Bacon, Burton, Browne, Walton. Considera; 
tion of religious, political, and scientific backgrounds. 

330. British Literature of the Eighteenth Century. (4) Representatiye poetry anc| 
prose, exclusive of the novel, 1700-1800, drawn from Addison, Steele, Defoe, Swift, 
Pope, Johnson, and Boswell. Consideration of cultural backgrounds and significan 
literary trends. 

332. Satire. (4) The nature of the satiric form and the satiric spirit as revealei 
through reading and critical analysis of significant examples, mostly British anc 
American. 

335. Eighteenth Century British Fiction. (4) Primarily the fiction of Defoe, Richard 
son. Fielding, Smollett, Sterne, and Austen. 

336. Restoration and Eighteenth Century British Drama. (4) British drama fron 
1660 to 1780, including representatiye plays by Dryden, Etherege, Wycherley 
Congre\e, Goldsmith, and Sheridan. 

338. British Literature of the Late Eighteenth Century. (4) A study of the period' 
interest in the exotic, the gothic, the oriental, and the medieval. Authors include 
Goldsmith, Burns, Walpole, and Burke. 

350. British Romantic Poets. (4) A re\iew of the beginnings of Romanticism ir 
British literature, followed by study of Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Keats, anc 
Shelley; collateral reading in the prose of the period. 

353. Nineteenth Century British Fiction. (4) Representatiye major works by Dick: 
ens, Eliot, Thackeray, Hardy, the Brontes, and others. 

354. Victorian Poetry. (4) A study of Tennyson, Browning, Hopkins, and Arnold o 
another Victorian poet. 

360. Studies in Victorian Literature. (4) Selected topics, such as deyelopment o 
genres, major texts, and cultural influences. Readings in poetry, fiction, autobiogra' 
phy, and other prose. 

362. Blake, Yeats, and Thomas. (3 or 4) Reading and critical analysis of the poetry o 
Blake, Yeats, and Dylan Thomas; study of the plays of Yeats and his contemporarie 
in the Irish Renaissance, especially Svnge and Lady Gregory. 

364. Studies in Literary Criticism. (4) Consideration of certain figures and school 
of thought significant in the history of literary criticism. 

365. Twentieth Century British Fiction. (4) A study of Conrad, Lawrence, Joyce 
Forster, Woolf, and later British writers, with attention to their social and intellectua 
backgrounds. 



99 



$67. Twentieth Century Poetry. (4) Selected American and British poets from 1900 
|o 1965. 

168. Studies in Irish Literature. (4) Critical readings of the works of major Irish 
jvriters within the context of the political, social, and literary history of Ireland. 

(69. Modern Drama. (4) Main currents in modern drama from nineteenth century 
laturalism and symbolism through expressionism and absurdism, including repre- 
lentative plays by Shaw, O'Neill, Williams, and Pinter. 

172. American Romanticism. (4) Writers of the mid-nineteenth century, including 
Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, and Melville. 

176. American Poetry from 1855 to 1900. (4) Readings from at least two of the 
bllowing poets: Whitman, Dickinson, Melville. 

(78. Literature of the American South. (4) A study of Southern literature from its 
beginnings to the present, with emphasis upon such major writers as Tate, Warren, 
T aulkner, O'Connor, Welty, and Styron. 

,(80. American Fiction from 1865 to 1915. (4) Such writers as Twain, James, Howells, 
Crane, Dreiser, Wharton, and Cather. 

(81. Studies in Black American Literature. (4) Reading and critical analysis of 
.elected fiction, poetrv, drama, and other writing by representative black Americans. 

(82. Modern American Fiction, 1915 to the Present. (4) To include such writers as 
^ewis, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, Steinbeck, Wolfe, Wright, Katherine Anne 
•?orter, Mailer, Bellow, Malamud, Flannery O'Connor, Baldwin, and Styron. 

(86. Directed Reading (2—4) A tutorial in an area of study not otherwise provided by 
he department; granted upon departmental approval of petition presented by a 
jualified student. 

(88. Honors in English. (4) A conference course centering upon a special reading 
,'equirement and a thesis requirement. For senior students wishing to graduate with 
'Honors in English." 

(89. The Use of the Library in Literary Research. (2) Attention to materials, 
jiethods, and bibliography for the study of literature. 

i90. The Structure of English. (4) An introduction to the principles and techniques 
)f modern linguistics applied to contemporary' American English. 

German 

Wilmer D. Sanders, Chairman 

Professors Ralph S. Fraser, James C. O'Flaherty, Wilmer D. Sanders 

Associate Professors Timothy F. Sellner, Larry E. West 

A major in German requires thirty-seven credits beyond German 111, 112. These 
nust include German 218 and should include 281 and 285. A minor in German 
(equires Five courses beyond German 152 or 153, one of which must be German 218. 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to apply for admission to the 



100 



honors program in German. To be graduated with the designation "Honors irl 
German," they must complete a senior research project and pass a comprehensive 
examination. For additional information members of the departmental faculty 
should be consulted. 

There is an exchange program with the Free University of Berlin. 

Ill, 112. Elementary German. (4, 4) This course covers the principles of grammar 
and pronunciation and includes the reading of simple texts. Lab — one hour. 

152. Intermediate German. (4) The principles of grammar are reviewed; reading oil 
selected prose and poetry. Lab — one hour. P — Three years of high school German.. 

153. Intermediate German. (5) The principles of grammar are reviewed; reading ol 
selected prose and poetrv. Lab — one hour. P — German 111, 112. 

211, 212. Introduction to German Literature. (4, 4) The object of this course is U 
acquaint the student with masterpieces of German literature. Parallel reading and 
reports. P — German 152 or 153. 

217. Conversation and Phonetics. (4) A course in spoken German emphasizing 
facility of expression. Considerable attention is devoted to phonetics. P — German 
152, 153, or equivalent. 

218. Composition and Grammar Review. (4) A review of the fundamentals oi 
German grammar with intensive practice in translation and composition. Required 
for majors. P— German 152 or 153 or equivalent. 

219. Advanced Composition. (4) A study of advanced grammar and composition: 
English texts translated into German in addition to free composition in German. 
P — German 218 or equivalent. 

220. German Civilization. (4) A survey of contemporary German culture, including 
a study of its historical development in broad outline. The course is conducted in 1 
German. P — German 217 or permission of instructor. 

231. Weimar Germany. (4) Historical and literary examination of Weimar Germany, 
1919-1933. Authors include Thomas and Heinrich Mann, Juenger, Hesse, Brecht, 
Kafka, Tucholsky, Fallada, and Stefan Zweig. German or history credit determined, 
at registration. 

249. Old High German and Middle High German Literature. (4) The study of majorj 
writers and works from these two areas; emphasizes major writings of the chivalric 
period. P — German 211, 212, or equivalent. 

250. Renaissance, Reformation, and Baroque German Literature. (4) A study of 
major writers and works from the post-chivalric period to approximately 1700. 
P — German 211, 212, or equivalent. 

253. Eighteenth Century German Literature. (4) A study of major writers and works 
of the Enlightenment and Sturm und Drang. P — German 211, 212, or equivalent. 

263. German Literature of the Nineteenth Century I. (4) Poetrv, prose, dramas, and 
critical works from approximately 1795 to 1848. P — German 211, 2 12, or equivalent.) 



101 



64. German Literature of the Nineteenth Century II. (4) Readings from the 
eginnings of Poetic Realism to the advent of Naturalism. P — German 211, 212, or 
quivalent. 

70. Individual Study. (3 or 4) Studies in literature not ordinarily read in other 
Durses. P — German 211, 212, and permission of instructor. 

81. Seminar: Twentieth Century Prose. (4) Intensive study of certain works by 
nomas Mann, Hesse, and Kafka, plus considerable outside reading. P — German 
,11, 212, or equivalent. 

85. Seminar in Goethe. (4) Faust, Part I studied in class. Parallel readings in other 
orks by Goethe assigned. P — German 211, 212, or equivalent. 

87, 288. Honors in German. (3, 3) A conference course in German literature. A 
tajor research paper is required. Designed for candidates for departmental honors. 



History 

Richard L. Zuber, Chairman 

Professors Richard C. Barnett, Cyclone Covey, 

Balkrishna Govind Gokhale, J. Edwin Hendricks, Thomas E. Mullen, 

Percival Perry, David L. Smiley, Henry Smith Stroupe, Lowell R. Tillett, 

W. Buck Yearns, Richard L. Zuber 

ssociate Professors James P. Barefield, Merrill G. Berthrong, David W. Hadley, 

James G. McDowell, Michael L. Sinclair, J. Howell Smith, Alan J. Williams 

Lecturer Negley Boyd Harte (London) 

Instructor Victor Kamendrowsky 

, The major in history consists of a minimum of thirty-six credits and must include 
iistory 310, from six to eight credits in European history, three or four credits in 
pn-Western history, and from six to eight credits in American history. One of the 
merican history courses must be 151, 152, or 153. 

A minor in history requires twenty-four credits. 

Highly qualified majors should apply for admission to the honors program in 
'istory. To be graduated with the designation "Honors in History," the student must 
>mplete satisfactorily History 287 and 288. For additional information members of 
|ie departmental faculty should be consulted. 

Students contemplating graduate study should take historiography and should 
[:quire a reading knowledge of one modern foreign language (preferably French, 
ierman, or Russian) for the M.A. degree and two for the Ph.D. degree. 

)1. The Rise of the West. (4) A survey of ancient, medieval, and early modern 
story to 1700. 

; )2. Europe and the World in the Modern Era. (4) A survey of modern Europe from 
7 00 to the present. 

II. European Historical Biography. (2) Study of biographies of men and women 
ho have influenced the history and civilization of Europe. 



102 



151, 152. The United States. (4. 4) Political, social, economic, and intellectual aspect I 
151: before 1865: 152: after 1865. Students who take History 153 mav not take eithf ] 
of these courses for credit. 

153. The United States. (4) A topical survey combining 151 and 152. Not open I 
students who take either 151 or 152. 

160. Freud. (4) An investigation of Freud's basic ideas in the context of his dm' 
Books to be read include The Interpretation of Dreams, Civilization and Its Discontent 
and Jones' biography in the Trilling abridgement. 

211. Colloquium. (1-4). 

215, 216. The Ancient World. (4, 3 or 4) Critical focus on the Greeks in the fall an 
Romans in the spring, but in global context of paleolithic to medieval: psvchologica 
philosophical emphasis. 

221. The Middle Ages. (4) A survey of European historv, 400—1300, stressing soci; 
and cultural developments. 

224. The Reformation. (2) Europe in the age of the Reformation. 

2260. History of London. (4) Topographical, social, economic, and political histoi 
of London from the earliest times. Lectures, student papers and reports, museui 
visits and lectures, and on-site inspections. Offered in London. 

2262. The Golden Age of Burgundy. (2 1 Burgundian societv, culture, and goven 
ment in the reigns of Philip the Bold. John the Fearless, Philip the Good, and Charl^ 
the Rash, 1384-1477. Offered in Dijon. 

2263. Venetian Society and Culture. (4) An examination of Venetian societv, inclui 
ing the role within Venetian life of music, theater, the church, and civic ritual. ; 

231. Weimar Germany. (4) Historical and literarv examination of Weimar Germa 

1919—1933. Authors include Thomas and Heinrich Mann, Juenge, 
Hesse. Brecht, Kafka, Tucholskv, Fallada, and Stefan Zweig. German or histoi 
credit determined at registration. 

232. European Historical Novels. (2) Study of the accuracv and value, from tf 
standpoint of the historian, of a selection of historical novels. 

238. Twentieth Century Europe. (4) Advent of modernism. World Wars I and I 
totalitarianism, the Cold War. and Europe in the post-European era. 

240. Afro- American History. (4) The role of Afro- Americans in the development! 
the L T nited States, with particular attention to African heritage, forced migratio 
Americanization, and influence. 

264. Economic History of the United States. ( 3 ) The economic development of d 
United States from colonial beginnings to the present. 

265. American Diplomatic History. (4) An introduction to the historv of America 
diplomacy since 1776, emphasizing the effects of public opinion on fundament 
policies. 



103 



!70. Oral History. (4) How to research family and community history with the tape 
'ecorder. 

71. Colonial Latin America, 1492-1825. (4) Cultural configurational approach. 

!87, 288. Honors in History. (4,4)287: seminar on problems of historical synthesis 
nd interpretation; 288: writing of a major paper and examination on a special field. 

110. Seminar. (4) Offered by members of the faculty on topics of their choice. A 
japer is required. 

ill, 312. Social and Intellectual History of Modern Europe. (4, 4) Intellectual 
rends in Western European civilization. 311: seventeenth and eighteenth centuries; 
|Ii2: nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Not offered in '82-83. 

i 16. France and England in the Twelfth and Thirteenth Centuries. (4) The struc- 
ure of society, the nature of law, church/state relations, and intellectual develop- 
ments. P — History 221 or permission of instructor. 

. 19, 320. Germany. (4,4) 319: origins of the German nation and the rise of Prussia in 
. context of particularism; 320: from Bismarck to divided Germany. 

'21,322. France. (4,4) 321: from prehistoric Gaul to 1788, with particular emphasis 
m the sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries; 322: 1788 to the present. 

■23, 324. England. (4, 4) A political and social survey, with some attention to 
Continental movements. 323: to 1603; 324: 1603 to present. 

'25. Tudor and Early Stuart England. (4) A constitutional and social study of 
England from 1485 to 1641. 

•29, 330. Modern England. (4, 4) Political, social, economic, and cultural history of 
England since 1714; 329: to 1815; 330: since 1815. 

■31,332. Russia (4, 4) Political, social, economic, and cultural history of Russia. 331: 
he Russian empire; 332: the Soviet Union. 

33. European Diplomacy, 1848-1914. (4) The diplomacy of the great powers, with 
ome attention given to the role of publicity in international affairs. Topics include 
(he unification of Italy and of Germanv, the Bismarckian system, and the coming of 
Vorld War I. 

.35, 336. Italy. (4, 4) 335: medieval and Renaissance Italy to 1529; 336: 1529 to the 
iresent. 

,41. Southeast Asia from 151 1 to the Present. (4) A survey of the history and culture 
f Southeast Asia under Western colonial systems, with special reference to economic, 
ocial, and cultural developments, the rise of nationalism, and the emergence of new 
ation-states. 

42. The Middle East from Suleiman the Magnificent to the Present. (4) Major 
ubjects covered are the rise and fall of the Ottoman Empire, the Arabs and Persians 
inder Ottoman hegemony, the rise of Arab nationalism, and the emergence of the 
nodern Arab states and their roles in the post-World War II era. 

43. Imperial China. (4) Development of traditional institutions in Chinese society to 



104 



1644; attention to social, cultural, and political factors, emphasizing continuity an! 
resistance to change. 

344. Modern China. (4) The Manchu Dynasty and its response to the Wester 
challenge, the 1911 Revolution, the warlord era and the rise of the Communist' 
Chinese Communist society, and the Cultural Revolution. 

345, 346. History and Civilization of South Asia. (4. 4) An introduction to th 
history and civilization of South Asia. Emphasis on historical developments in th 
social, economic, and cultural life of the area. 

347. India in Western Literatures. (4) A one-semester historical survey of images c 
India in Western literatures, with special reference to religious and philosophic^ 
ideas, art, polity, society, and culture. 

348. Modern Japan. (4) Tokugawa era: Meiji Restoration; industrialization an: 
urbanization; relations with the West; World War II; occupation; Japan in th 
contemporary world. 

349. 350, East Asia. (4, 4) An introduction to the social, cultural, and politics 
development of China, Japan, and Korea. 349: to 1600; 350: since 1600. 

351, 352. American Society and Thought. (4, 4) A non-political topical survey d 
American culture and lifestyles. Topics include religion, science, education 
architecture, and immigration. 

353. Colonial English America, 1582-1774. (4) Determinative episodes, figures 
allegiances, apperceptions, and results of the period, organically considered. 

354. Revolutionary and Early National America, 1763—1815. (4) The America 
Revolution, its causes and effects, the Confederation, the Constitution, and the ne< 
nation. 

355. The Westward Movement. (4) The role of the frontier in United States history 
1763-1890. 

356. Jacksonian America, 1815-1850. (4) The United States in the age of Jacksor, 
Clav, Calhoun, and Webster. A biographical approach. 

357. The Civil War and Reconstruction. (4) The political and military events of th, 
war and the economic, social, and political readjustments which followed. 

358. The United States from Reconstruction to World War I. (4) National progre! 
and problems during an era of rapid industrialization. 

359. The United States from Versailles to Pearl Harbor. (4) The transition q 
America from World War I to 1941, with special emphasis on the Roaring Twende 
and the New Deal. 

360. The United States since Pearl Harbor. (4) Trends and changes in the natioj 
from World War II through the Kennedy era to the present. 

362. American Constitutional History. (4) Origins of the Constitution, the con 
troversies involving the nature of the Union, and constitutional readjustments t 
meet the new American industrialism. 



105 



(53, 364. The South. (4, 4) Geography, population elements, basic institutions, and 
fleeted events. 

55. Women in American History. (4) A survey of the roles and activities of women 
i America, with emphasis upon selected individuals. 

56. Studies in Historic Preservation. (4) An analysis of history museums and 
gencies and of the techniques of preserving and interpreting history through 
J-tifacts, restorations, and reconstructions. P — Permission of instructor. 

57. 368. North Carolina. (4, 4) Selected phases of the development of North 
arolina from the colonial beginnings to the present. 367: to 1789; 368: since 1789. 

59. The American Military Experience. (4) A survey of the military ideas and 
itivities of the American people and their armed forces, with emphasis on the 
plationship between war and society. 

91, 392. Historiography. (4, 3) The principal historians and their writings from 
icient times to the present. 391: European historiography; 392: American histori- 
jraphv. 

98. Individual Study. (4) A project in an area of study not otherwise available in the 
epartment; permitted upon departmental approval of petition presented by a 
ualified student. 

■99. Directed Reading. ( 1—4) Concentrated reading in an area of study not otherwise 
/ailable. P — Permission of instructor. 

Humanities 

N. Rick Heatley, Coordinator 

13. Studies in European Literature. (4) A study of approximately twelve works in 
lanslation, taken from European literature. Satisfies a Division I requirement. 

14. Contemporary Fiction. (4) A study of contemporary European and Latin 
'merican fiction in translation. Satisfies a Division I requirement. 

15. Germanic and Slavic Literature. (4) A study of approximately twelve works in 
'anslation taken from Germanic and Slavic literatures. Satisfies a Division I require- 
ent. 

16. Romance Literature. (4) A study of approximately twelve works in translation 
ken from Romance literatures. Satisfies a Division I requirement. 

17. European Drama. (4) A study of selected works in translation, from the seven- 
enth to the twentieth centuries, by major Continental dramatists. Satisfies a Divi- 
3n I requirement. 

•0. Discovering the Visual and Verbal Modes of the Twentieth Century. (4) An 

.ploration of the ideas, values, and feelings found in the art and literature of 
jpresentative twentieth century figures: Kandinsky, Stevens, Picasso, Kafka, Leger, 
:ckett, Klee, Ionesco, Pollock, Faulkner, Chagall, Barth, and others. 

>5. Twentieth Century Issues in the Arts. (4) An interdisciplinary investigation of 



106 



twentieth-century issues in the arts, taught by art, music, and theatre faculty; topii 
change yearly; participation by local, regional, and national authorities in the art 
P — Art 103, or Music 101 or 202, or Theatre Arts 121 or permission of instructed 

340. Race in the Southern Experience before Emancipation: Four Voices. ( t 

Selected writings of David Walker, William Lloyd Garrison, Frederick Douglass, an, 
Harriet Beecher Stowe. Pass/Fail only, 




107 



'■42. Race, Politics, and Literature: Aspects of American Life from 1830 to 1930. (4) 

in examination of the evolution of significant ideas in American civilization. A 
areful reading of Frederick Douglass, Harriet Beecher Stowe, W. E. DuBois, Mark 
'wain, and others. 

50. What the Arts Have Been Saying since 1800. (4) An experiment in developing 
nterpretive judgment and insight regarding music, painting, and literature as ar- 
iculations of the frontier consciousness of the period. 

152. The Classical and Surreal Tradition. (4) A venture to define and differentiate 
•lassical and surreal modes of perception throughout history, their paradoxical 
elationship to each other and to complementary styles, considered in philosophy, 
nusic, literature, and painting. 

158. An Editor Looks at the Rights of American Citizens, 1965-Present. (2, 3, or 4) 

Current developments in the field of constitutional rights as seen by a newspaper 
fditor. 

:I73. France in the Thirties: Literature and Social Consciousness. (4) A study in 
English of Malraux, Giraudoux, Celine, Bernanos, and St. Exuperv. Satisfies a 
Mvision 1 requirement. 

74. French Literature in the Mid-Twentieth Century. (4) A study of the literature 
f the forties and fifties and its evolution from "commitment" to "disengagement." 
Uithors include Sartre, Camus, Beckett, Robbe-Grillet, Genet, and Duras. Satisfies a 
Mvision I requirement. 

75. The French Theatre between 1920 and 1960: Theory and Practice. (4) Study of 
orks bv Giraudoux, Cocteau, Anouilh, Sartre, Camus, Beckett, Ionesco, and Genet, 
atisfies a Division I requirement. 

78. Evolution of Autobiography as a Literary Form. (4) A study of autobiography 
s a form of fiction. Reading of Rousseau's Confessions and selected autobiographies 
f twentieth century French authors. Satisfies a Division I requirement. 

79. The Literary Works of Jean-Paul Sartre. (4) A critical study of Sartre's evolution 
is retlected in his novels and plays from Nausea to The Prisoners of Altona. 

180. Albert Camus. (3) A critical study of Camus' evolution as a writer. 

Interdisciplinary Honors 

Paul M. Gross Jr., Coordinator 

A series of seminar courses of an interdisciplinary nature are open to qualified 
ndergraduates. Students interested in admission to any one of these seminars, 
upervised by the Committee on Honors, should consult the coordinator or a mem- 
«r of the committee. 

Students who choose to participate in as many as four interdisciplinary seminars 
nd who have a superior record may elect Honors 281, directed study culminating in 
n honors paper and an oral examination. Those whose work has been superior in 
his course and who have achieved an overall grade point average of at least 3.0 in all 



108 

college work may be graduated with the distinction "Honors in the Arts and Sci- 
ences." Students who choose to be candidates for departmental honors may not also 
be candidates for "Honors in the Arts and Sciences." 

Able students are normally encouraged to choose a departmental honors program 
rather than "Honors in the Arts and Sciences." As a result, most students elect to 
participate in only one or two interdisciplinary seminars in which they are particular- 
ly interested. The faculty participants for these seminars represent diyerse academic 
disciplines. 

131, 132. Approaches to Human Experience I. (4, 4) An inquiry into the nature and 
interrelationships of seyeral approaches to man's experience, represented by the 
work of three such minds as Leonardo da Vinci, Dante, Newton, Gandhi. Confucius, 
Dostoe\sky, Descartes, Goya. Mozart. Jefferson, and Bohr. Seminar discussion based 
on primary and secondary sources, including musical works and paintings. Written 
reports and a term paper required. Offered in alternate years. 

133, 134. Approaches to Human Experience II. (4, 4) A parallel course to Honors 
131, 132, concentrating on the work of a different set of figures such as Buber, 
Galileo, Keynes, Pascal, Camus, Picasso, Ibsen, Tagore, Sophocles, and Bach. Offered' 
in alternate years. 

*233. Darwinism and the Modern World. (4) A study of the Darwinian theory of 
evolution and the impact of evolution and the impact of evolutionary thought on 
fields such as economics, politics, psychology, literature and the other arts, and 
philosophy. 

*235. The Ideal Society. (4) Man's effort to establish or imagine the ideal community, 
state, or society; principles of political and social organization; changing goals and 
values. 

*237. The Scientific Outlook. (4) An exploration of the origins and development of 
the scientific method and some of its contemporary applications in the natural and 
social sciences and the humanities. 

*238. Romanticism. (4) Romanticism as a recurrent characteristic of mind and art and 
as a specific historical movement in Europe and America in the late eighteenth and 
nineteenth centuries. Emphasis on primary materials in philosophy, literature, 
music, and painting. 

*239. Man and the Irrational. (4) The phenomenon of the irrational, with emphasis 1 
on its twentieth century manifestations but with attention also to its presence in other 
centuries and cultures. Philosophy, religion, literature, psychology, politics, and the 
arts are explored. 

*241. The Tragic View. (4) The theory of tragedy in ancient and modern times; the 
expression of the tragic in literature, art, music, theatre, and film. 

*242. The Comic View. (4) The theory of comedy in ancient and modern times; the 
expression of the comic spirit in literature, art, music, theatre, and film. 



*One or more offered each year at the discretion of the Committee on Honors. 



109 



244. Man and the Structure of the Universe. (4) An investigation of various concep- 
tions of the universe and their implications for man. Study not necessarilv limited to 
the cosmologies of Ptolemv, Copernicus, and their modern successors, but may also 
include theories such as the Babvlonian, Mayan, and Taoist. 

246. Man and the Environment. (4) An interdisciplinary examination of man and 
societv in relation to the environment. 

'247. The Mythic View. (4) The nature of myth through creation and hero myths; the 
uses to which myths have been put in different historical periods; various modern 
explanations of myth (literary, religious, anthropological, psychoanalytic, social, and 
historical). 

<248. The Ironic View. (4) An investigation of the ironic view of life in literature, art, 
history, theatre, and film. 
250. Ethical Dilemmas in the Arts and Sciences. (4) An exploration of contempo- 

Irarv issues and controversies in the sciences and art, particularly those involved with 
ethical questions resulting from new concepts and discoveries. 

281. Directed Study. (4) Readings on an interdisciplinary topic approved by the 
Committee on Honors; preparation of a major research or interpretive paper based 
ion these readings, under the direction of a faculty member; an oral examination on 
the topic, administered by the faculty supervisor and the Committee on Honors. 
Eligible students who wish to take this course must submit a written request to the 
Committee on Honors bv the end of the junior vear. Not open to candidates for 
departmental honors. 

Mathematics 

Marcellus E. Waddill, Chairman 

Professors John V. Baxley, Richard D. Carmichael, Ivey C. Gentry 

Fredric T. Howard, J. Gaylord May, W. Graham May 

John W. Sawyer, Ben M. Seelbinder, Marcellus E. Waddill 

Associate Professors Elmer K. Hayashi, Ellen E. Kirkman, James Kuzmanovich 

Instructors Charles S. Hinson Jr., Stephen P. Richters, Joanne M. Sulek 

A major in mathematics requires forty credits. A student must include courses 111. 
112, 113, 12 1,221, one of the courses 31 1,317. 352, 357, and at least two additional 
300-leve! courses. A prospective teacher in the education block may take 23 1 in lieu 
of the course from 311.317, 352, or 357. Lower division students are urged to consult 
a member of the departmental faculty before enrolling in courses other than those 
satisfying Division II requirements. 

A minor in computer science requires four courses in computer science numbered 
higher than 171 and two courses in mathematics other than 105 or 107. 



*0ne or more offered each year at the discretion of the Committee on Honors. 



A minor in mathematics requires Mathematics 111, 112. either 121 or 1 13, anc | 
three other courses numbered higher than Mathematics 1 13, two of which must b< , 
numbered above 200. 

A minimum GPAof 2.0 in courses in mathematics is required for graduation with £ I 
major or minor in mathematics. A minimum GPA of 2.0 in courses in mathematie i 
and computer science combined is required for graduation with a minor in compute] ( 
science. 

A regularlv scheduled activity in mathematics is an informal seminar of student; I 
and faculty on topics not discussed in regular courses (for example, finite differ- I 
ences, game theory, Monte Carlo method, divergent series). 

The Departments of Mathematics and Economics offer a joint major leading to a I 
Bachelor of Science degree in mathematical economics. This interdisciplinary pro- | 
gram affords the student an opportunity to applv mathematical methods to the ! 
development of economic theory, models, and quantitative analysis. The majoi i 
consists of the following course requirements: Mathematics 111, 112, 113, 121,25b 1 
Economics 151, 152, 201, 202, 203; a joint seminar in mathematical economics; and \ 
three additional courses chosen with the approval of the program advisers. Recom- 
mended courses are Mathematics 253. 348. 353, 357, 358, and Economics 251, 242. I 
287, 288. Students electing the joint major must receive permission from both the j 
Department of Economics and the Department of Mathematics. 

Highly qualified majors are invited bv the department to applv for admission to the | 
honors program in mathematics or in the joint majors. To be graduated with the 1 
designation "Honors in Mathematics," or "Honors in Mathematical Economics," they I 
must complete satisfactorily a senior research paper and pass a comprehensive oral;! 
,or written examination. For additional information members of the departmental 
faculty should be consulted. 

Computer Science 

171. Introduction to FORTRAN Programming. (2) Lecture and laboratory. A study 
of FORTRAN language; students use computer terminals as well as card input. 

173. Introduction to Computer Programming. (4) Lecture and laboratory. A first 
course in structured programming, problem solving, and coding in a high leveh 
programming language. 

175. COBOL Programming. (4) Lecture and laboratory. A study of the elements i 
COBOL language. P — Computer Science 171 or 173. 

271. Computer Organization and Assembly Language Programming. (4) Lecture 1 ! 
and laboratory. A studv of the wavs information is stored and handled in a computer: 
an introduction to machine and assembly language. P — Computer Science 1 73 or 
175. 

361. Selected Topics. (2. 3. or 4) Topics in computer science which are not studied in 
regular courses or which further examine topics begun in regular courses. Content 
varies. Not to be counted toward the minor in computer science. 

371. Elementary Data Structures. (4) Lecture and laboratory. A course in advanced 



11] 



programming techniques, including the study of stacks, queues, lists, list processing, 
ind recursion. P — Computer Science 173 or 175. 

572. Data Structures. (4) Lecture and laboratory. A continuation of Computer 
Science 371, including the study of trees, graphs, sorting, searching, and algorithm 
Efficiency. P — Computer Science 371. 

$81. Individual Study. (2, 3, or 4) A course of independent study directed by a 
acuity advisor. Bv prearrangement. Not to be counted toward the minor in comput- 



er science. 



Mathematics 

105. Pre-Calculus Mathematics. (2, 3, or 4) Selected topics deal with the structure of 
number systems and the elementary functions. Not to be counted toward the major 
In mathematics. 

107. Finite Mathematics. (5) Probability and statistics, matrices, linear program- 
ming, Markov chains, and theory of games. Lab — two hours. 

108. Essential Calculus. (5) A one-semester course in differential and integral 
calculus with application to business and the social sciences. No student allowed 
;redit for both 108 and 111. A student who might take additional calculus should not 
t :ake Mathematics 108. Lat> — two hours. 

Ill, 112. Calculus with Analytic Geometry I, II. (5, 5) Calculus of functions of one 
Variable; infinite series. Computer lab using BASIC. No student allowed credit for 
both 108 and 111. 

113. Multivariable Calculus. (4) Vector and space curves. Differentiable functions; 
surfaces and max-min problems. Multiple integrals and Green's theorems. P — 
Mathematics 1 12. 

121. Linear Algebra. (4) Vectors and vector spaces, linear transformations and 
matrices, linear groups, and determinants. 

156. Statistical Concepts. (4) An introductory course for the student of statistics who 
has a limited mathematical background. Includes descriptive techniques, frequency 
distributions, statistical inference, regression, and correlation. Emphasis is placed on 
how statistics can be used in society. No student allowed credit for both 156 and 157. 

157. Elementary Probability and Statistics. (5) Probability and distribution func- 
tions, means and variances, and sampling distributions. Lab — two hours. No student 
allowed credit for both 156 and 157. 

221. Modern Algebra I. (4) An introduction to modern abstract algebra through the 
Uudv of groups, rings, integral domain, and fields. P — Mathematics 121. 

231. Euclidean Geometry. (4) Postulates, definitions, theorems, and models of 
Euclidean geometry. 

251. Ordinary Differential Equations. (4) Linear equations with constant coeffi- 



112 



cients, linear equations with variable coefficients, and existence and uniqueness 
theorems for first order equations. P — Mathematics 112. 

253. Operations Research. (4) Mathematical models and optimization techniques. 
Studies in allocation, simulation, queuing, scheduling, and network analysis. P — 
Mathematics 111, 107, or equivalent. 

311, 312. Advanced Calculus I, II. (4, 4) Limits and continuitv in metric spaces, 
differentiation and Riemann-Stieltjes integration, sequences and series, uniform 
convergence, power series and Fourier series, partial differentiation and functions of 
n real variables, implicit and inverse function theorem. P — Mathematics 113. 

317. Complex Analysis I. (4) Analytic functions, Cauchv's theorem and its conse- 
quences, power series, and residue calculus. P — Mathematics 113. 

322. Modern Algebra II. (4) A continuation of modern abstract algebra through the 
study of additional properties of group and fields and a thorough treatment of vector 
spaces. P — Mathematics 221. 

323, 324. Matrix Theory I, II. (4, 4) Basic concepts and theorems concerning 
matrices and real number functions defined on preferred sets of matrices. P — 
Mathematics 121. 

332. Non-Euclidean Geometry. (4) Postulates, definitions, theorems, and models of 
Lobachevskian and Riemannian geometry. 

345, 346. Elementary Theory of Numbers I, II. (4. 4) Properties of integers, congru- 
ences, arithmetic functions, primitive roots, sums of squares, magic squares, applica- 
tions to elementary mathematics, quadratic residues, arithmetic theory of continued 
fractions. 

348. Combinatorial Analysis. (4) Enumeration techniques, including generating 
functions, recurrence formulas, the principle of inclusion and exclusion, and Polya's 
theorem. 

351. Applied Analysis. (4) Topics which have proven useful in the phvsical sciences, 
including vector analysis and complex analysis. 

352. Partial Differential Equations. (4) The separation of variables techniques for 
the solution of the wave, heat, Laplace, and other partial differential equations, with 
the related studv of the Fourier transform and the expansion of functions in Fourier, 
Legendre, and Bessel series. 

353. Mathematical Models. (4) Development and application of probabilistic and 
deterministic models. Emphasis given to constructing models which represent svs- 
tems in the social, behavioral, and management sciences. P — Mathematics 253. 

355. Numerical Analysis. (4) A computer-oriented studv of analvtical methods in i 
mathematics. Lecture and laboratory. P — Mathematics 1 12 and Computer Science 
171 or 173. 

357, 358. Mathematical Statistics I, II. (4, 4) Probability distributions, mathematical 
expectation, sampling distributions, estimation and testing of hypotheses, regres- 



113 



sion, correlation, and analysis of variance. C — Mathematics 1 13, or P — Permission of 
instructor. 

361. Selected Topics. (2, 3, or 4) Topics in mathematics which are not considered in 
regular courses or which continue study begun in regular courses. Content varies. 

381. Individual Study. (2, 3, or 4) A choice of study in an area of individual interest 
directed by a faculty adviser. 

Military Science 

Lieutenant Colonel Matthew P. Murray Jr., Professor 

Major Robert H. Lewis, Major James H. Wakeman, 

Captain David E. Janney, Captain Jasper L. McBride, 

Captain Curtis L. Shelton, Captain David E. Walters, 

Assistant Professors 

Sergeant Major Ezequiel B. Evaro, Master Sergeant Curtis Torry, 

Sergeant First Class Donald F. Pope, Staff Sergeant Albert E. Folds 

Completion of the Reserve Officer Training Corps requirements results in the 
conferring of a commission in the United States Army. The basic courses (110, 111, 

[112, 113, 114, 116, 202S) are designed to provide the fundamentals of military 
history, Army organization and operation, leadership, and managerial assessment 
methods. The advanced courses (211, 212, 251, 252) provide study in professional 

I knowledge subjects and development of the managerial skills required for commis- 

■sioning. 

110. ROTC and the National Defense. (2) Introduction to the Reserve Officers' 
I Training Corps program, the United States Army, and basic professional knowledge 
| subjects. 

i 111. Military History. (2) Survey of the ideas and activities of the American people 
I which contributed to the development of the Armed Forces; relationship between 
w'ar and societv. 

112. Operations in Special Environments. (2) Planning and preparation for militarv 
(operations in mountain, desert, jungle, and arctic environments; fundamentals of 
survival; mountaineering techniques. 

|!113. Tactical Considerations of Modern Battle. (2) Organization and Operations of 
the United States Army. A non-classified comparison with the Army of the Soviet 
jUnion. Modern battle doctrine and equipment capabilities of both armies are ana- 
lyzed in both conventional and special tactical environments. 

1114. Leadership. (2) An examination of the fundamentals contributing to the de- 
jvelopment of a personal style of leadership with emphasis on the dimensions of 
(junior executive management. 

116. Orienteering. (2) A studv of navigational aids, linear time/distance rela- 
tionships, and mapping techniques. Includes navigating in unfamiliar terrain. 

202S. Combined Military Fundamentals. (4) History and organization of the United 



114 



States Armv. Basic and intermediate military skills to include leadership styles anc 
techniques, land navigation, dismounted drill, and mountaineering. P — Permission 
of instructor. Offered in the summer. 

211, 212. First Year Advanced. (2, 2) Accelerated leadership training; professiona ) 
knowledge subjects; preparation for ROTC Advanced Summer Camp; advancer, 
instruction on the Soviet Armv. LAB — 1 Vi hours per week. P — credit for one of the j 
following: 

(1) 1 10 and tw : o other MS basic courses, or 

(2) 202S (Combined Military Fundamentals), or 

(3) Attendance at ROTC Basic Summer Camp at Fort Knox, Kentucky (nc 1 
academic credit). 

251, 252. Second Year Advanced. (2, 2) Professionalism and Ethics; planning and 
supervision of leadership laboratory program, active dntv orientation, military admi 
nistration, law, and logistics. LAB — l'/a hours per week. P — Military Science 21 1 and 
212. 



Music 

John V. Mochnick, Acting Chairman 

Associate Professor Annette LeSiege 

Assistant Professors Christopher Giles, Louis Goldstein, 

David B. Levy, Donna Mayer-Martin, John V. Mochnick 

Director of Bands R. Davidson Burgess 

Instructors Lucille S. Harris, Teresa Radomski 

A major in music requires forty-eight credits. This includes a basic curriculum of 
thirtv-six credits (Music Theory 171, 172, 173, and 174, sixteen credits; Music 
History 181, 182, six credits; ten credits of applied music, and four credits of 
ensemble) plus twelve additional credits of elective courses in music. In addition td 
the course work, music majors are required to present a senior recital or project. 

Students anticipating a major in music are urged to begin their studies during the 
freshman year and are required to audition during the second semester of their 
sophomore year before being officially admitted to the program. 

Highly qualified majors may be invited to apply for admission to the honors; 
program in music. To be graduated with the designation "Honors in Music," a 
candidate must complete one of the following requirements: (1) an honors-level 
research paper, (2) an original composition, or (3) an analytical lecture related to 
music performed by the candidate in a public recital. 

A minor in music requires twenty-four credits: Music 171, 172; 181, 182; two 
semesters of ensemble; two semesters of applied music (performance level in applied 
music must be equal to the level expected of the majors at the time of the spring 
sophomore audition); six credits of music electives (excluding ensemble). Each minor) 
will be assigned an adviser in the Music Department and is encouraged to begin 
private lessons as early as possible. 



115 



Any student interested in majoring or minoring in music should consult the 
hairman of the department as soon as possible after entering the University. 



Music Theory 

01. Introduction to the Language of Music. (3, 4) Basic theoretical concepts and 
nusical terminology. Survey of musical styles, composers, and selected works from 
he Middle Ages through the twentieth century. For students not majoring in music. 

;02. Language of Music I. (3, 4) Survey of musical styles, composers, and selected 
vorks from the Middle Ages through the twentieth century. For students who can 
ead music. Not open to music majors. P — Permission of instructor. 

104. Basic Music Reading and Skills. (2) A study of the fundamentals of music 
heorv including kev signatures, scales, intervals, and chords, and basic sight-singing 
ind ear training skills. Designed for students wishing to participate in University 
■nsembles and those wishing to pursue vocal, instrumental, and compositional 
nstruction. 

.05. Music Theory for Non-Majors (4) A study and application of music fun- 
lamentals and music theory for the non-music major: analytical and compositional 
echniques. P — 104 or permission of instructor. 

[71. Music Theory I. (4) Music fundamentals: key signatures, scales, modes, inter- 
'als, triads, elements of music. Ear training, sight singing, and rhythm skills. (A 
me-hour piano class is required of students having no keyboard background.) 

:72. Music Theory II. (4) Seventh chords, beginning part-writing, basic counter- 
point, ear training, sight singing, rhythm skills, keyboard harmony. P — Music 171. 

i73. Music Theory III. (4) Altered chords, continuation of part-writing, eighteenth 
ind nineteenth century forms, ear training, sight singing, rhythm skills, keyboard 
tarmonv. P — Music 172. 

[74. Music Theory IV. (4) Expanded harmonic system of Impressionism and the 
wentieth centurv. New concepts of style and form. Ear training, sight singing, 
rhythm skills, keyboard harmony. P — Music 173. 

!02. Language of Music II. (3,4) An in-depth study of selected major works from the 
diddle Ages through the twentieth century. Not open to music majors. P — Music 101 
'>r 102 or permission of instructor. 

!70. Sixteenth Century Counterpoint. (2) Analysis of sixteenth century contra- 
puntal music, in particular that of Palestrina. Examination of Renaissance writings 
m counterpoint. Composition of canon and motet. Offered in alternate years. P — Music 
74. 

131. Eighteenth Century Counterpoint. (2) Analysis of eighteenth century contra- 
puntal styles, with concentration on the Well-Tempered Clavier and Art of the Fugue of 
. S. Bach. Composition of invention, canon, and fugue. Offered in alternate years. 
' — Music 174. 



116 



272. Analysis Seminar. (2) A study of analytical writings of theorists and composer; 
and the development of practical skills as they can be used in research and perform- 
ance preparation. Offered in alternate years. P — Music 174. 

273. Composition. ( 1 or 2) Individual instruction in the craft of musical composition 
Mav be repeated for credit. P — Permission of instructor. 

275. History of Theory. (2) A study of theoretical writing on musical acoustics! 
instruments, and notation from classical Greece to the present. Offered in alternate 
years. P — Music 174. 

276. Current Practices. (2) A survey of twentieth century compositional techniques 
notation, and performance problems involving the study of music and theoretica 
writings associated with major trends from 1900 to the present. Offered in altemaU 
years. P — Music 174. 




.17 



Music History 

124. Chamber Music. (2) Study of the history and repertoire of chamber music from 
the late Baroque to the twentieth century. Classroom work combined with actual 
rehearsal and performance of chamber repertoire. May be repeated for credit. 
P — Audition and permission of instructor. 

181. Music History I. (3) History of music from the Greeks to 1750. 

182. Music History II. (3) History of music from 1750 to the present. P — Music 181. 

201. Music History for Non-Majors. (3, 4) An historical survey of stylistic trends, 
major composers, and genera. P — Music 101 or 102 or permission of instructor. 

a. Middle Ages d. Classical 

b. Renaissance e. Romantic 

c. Baroque f. Contemporary 

203. History of Jazz. (2) A survey of American jazz from its origin to the present. 
Open to majors and non-majors. P — Music 101 or 102 or permission of instructor. 

204. Survey of Choral Music. (2) An historical overview of important genera (i.e., 
anthem, cantata, motet, mass, oratorio) with an emphasis on church music and 

iturgical function. Open to majors and non-majors. P — Music 101 or 102 or permis- 
sion of instructor. 

205. Survey of Orchestral Music. (2) An historical overview of important orchestral 
repertoire (i.e., symphony, concerto, overture, symphonic poem). Open to majors 
and non-majors. P — Music 101 or 102 or permission of instructor. 

206. Survey of Opera. (2) A study of the development of opera from 1600 to the 
present. Selected operas by European and American composers will be examined in 
class via record, score, and film. Class will attend opera performances when possible. 
Open to majors and non-majors. P — Music 101 or 102 or permission of instructor. 

207. Music in America. (2) A study of the music and musical trends in America from 
1650 to the present. The course will survey sacred and secular music from the 
Pilgrims to the current trends of American composers. P — Music 101 or 102 or 
permission of instructor. 

212. Music in the Church. Function of the church musician and the relationship of 
bis or her work to the church program. P — Music 174, 182. 

215. Philosophy of Music. (2) A survey of philosophical writings about music. 
Musical aesthetics; social, religious, and political concerns. P — Music 174, 182. 

219. Seminar in Medieval Music. (3) A study of medieval music, its philosophy, 
heory (including notational practices), and performance practices. Areas receiving 
ipecial emphasis are Gregorian chant repertoire, the Notre Dame School, Ars 
Intiqua, and Ars Nova. P — Music 174, 182 or permission of instructor. 



118 



220. Seminar in Renaissance Music. (3) A study of music from 1400 to 1600, its 
theory (including notational practices), and performance practices. The study begins 
with the Burgundian School, with special areas of emphasis the Netherlands compos- 
ers and the late Renaissance madrigal. P — Music 174, 182 or permission of in- 
structor. 

221. Seminar in Baroque Music. (3) Musical activity from about 1600 to Bach and 
Handel. Special emphasis on the development of national styles and their resolutions] 
toward the end of the era. P — Music 174, 182 or permission of instructor. 

222. Seminar in Eighteenth Century Music. (3) Musical developments from the sons 
of Bach through the Viennese Classicism of Havdn, Mozart, and Beethoven. P — > 
Music 174, 182 or permission of instructor. 

223. Seminar in Nineteenth Century Music. (3) Music from the latter part on 
Beethoven's career through Wagner and Brahms. Special emphasis on the post 
Beethoven schism and its ramifications. P — Music 174, 182 or permission of in- 
structor. 

224. Seminar in Twentieth Century Music. (3) A study of the major musical styles, 
techniques, and media of contemporary music from Debussv to the present. P- 
Music 174. 182 or permission of instructor. 



Music Education 

186. String Instruments. (2) Fundamentals of plaving and teaching all instrument: 
of the string family. Offered in alternate xears. 

187. Woodwind Instruments. (2) Fundamentals of playing and teaching all principle 

instruments of the woodwind family. Offered in alternate \ears. 

188. Brass and Percussion Instruments. (2) Fundamentals of plaving and teachim 
brass and percussion instruments. Offered in alternate \ears. 

280. Orchestration. (4) A study of the orchestral and wind band instruments, hov 
composers have used them throughout history, and the development of practical 
scoring and manuscript skills. Offered in alternate years. P — Music 174, 182. 

282. Conducting. (4) A study of conducting technique; practical experience will 
ensembles. P — Music 1 74 or permission of instructor. 

284. Music Literature Seminar. (3 or 4) A survey of repertoire, including an ex- 
amination of teaching materials in the student's special area of interest. P— 
Permission of instructor. 

289. Ensemble Methods. (2) A practical study of choral and instrumental training 
techniques. Discussion of tonal development, administration, bibliography, chora 
and instrumental repertoire, marching band, and instrumental problems. P — Musk 
101 or 102 or permission of instructor. 



119 

291. Teaching of Music. (4) The teaching and supervision of choral and in- 
strumental music in the public schools, all grades. P — Music 174, 182. 

Honors and Individual Study 

298. Individual Study. (2 or 4) A project in an area of study not otherwise available in 
jhe department. By pre-arrangement. 

'299. Honors in Music. (4) Individual study for honors candidates who have fulfilled 
he specific requirements. 

Ensemble 

Departmental ensembles are open to all students. Credit is earned on the basis of 
jme credit per semester of participation. 

ill. Opera Workshop. Study, staging, and performance of standard and contem- 
jorary operatic works. P — Permission of instructor. 

.12. Collegium Musicum. An ensemble stressing the performance practices and the 
performance of music of the medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque eras. Open to 
,'ocalists and instrumentalists. 

1 13. Orchestra. Study and performance of orchestral works from the classical and 
ontemporary repertoire. P — Audition. 

14. Madrigal Singers. A vocal chamber ensemble which specializes in the perform- 
nce of secular repertoire. P — Audition. 

15. Concert Choir. A select touring choir of forty-five voices which performs a 
arietv of choral literature from all periods. P — Audition. 

16. Choral Union. A large oratorio chorus which concentrates on the performance 
f major choral works. P — Audition. 

17. Marching Deacons Band. Performs for most football games. Meets twice 
/eekly. No audition required. Fall. 

18. Concert Band. Study and performance of music for wind band. P — Permission 
f instructor. Spring. 

,19. Symphonic Wind Ensemble. Study and performance of music for wind ensem- 
le. Regular performances on and off campus, including an annual tour. P — 

iudition. 

I 

21. Jazz Ensemble. Study and performance of written and improvised jazz for a 
venty-member ensemble. P — Audition. 

23. Piano Ensemble. Study of the elements of accompanying and ensemble playing 
irough class discussion and studio experience. P — Permission of instructor. 

Applied Music 

Applied music courses are open to all students with the permission of the instruc- 
ir. Credit is earned on the basis of lesson duration and weekly preparation. One 



120 



credit per semester implies a half-hour of instruction weekly and a minimum of one 
hour of dailv practice. Two credits per semester imply an hour of instruction weekly 
and a minimum of two hours daily practice. With the permission of the music faculty 
and with a proportional increase in practice, a student may earn three or four credits 
per semester. Students in applied music who do not have basic knowledge of notation 
and rhythm are advised to enroll in Music 101 either prior to or in conjunction with 
applied study. An applied music fee and practice fee are charged for all individual 
instruction. 

161, 261. Individual Instruction. (1 or 2) May be repeated for credit. Technical; 
studies and repertoire of progressive difficulty selected to meet the needs and 
abilities of the student. 



a. 


violin 


/■ 


oboe 


k. 


French horn 


P- 


piano 


b. 


viola 


g 


clarinet 


1. 


trombone 


?■ 


percussion 


c. 


cello 


h. 


bassoon 


m 


baritone 


r. 


guitar 


d. 


bass 


i. 


saxophone 


n. 


tuba 


v. 


voice 


e. 


flute 


J- 


trumpet 


0. 


organ 







165p. Class Piano. (1) Scales, chords, inversions, and appropriate repertoire, withi 
emphasis on sight-reading, harmonization, and simple transposition. Designed for 
the beginning piano student. 

165r. Class Guitar I. (1) Introduction to guitar techniques: strumming, plucking, 
arpeggi, and damping. Reading and playing from musical notation and guitar 
tablature. For beginning students. 

166r. Class Guitar II. (1) Continuation of guitar techniques. Emphasis on chordal: 
progressions, scales, accompanying patterns, and sight reading. P — Music 165r. 

165v. Class Voice I. (1) Introduction to the fundamental principles of singing; 
concepts of breath control, tone, and resonance. 

166v. Class Voice II. (1) Continuation of fundamental vocal techniques. P — Musici 
165v or permission of instructor. 

167v. Theatrical Singing I: Class Voice (1) Basic techniques of singing, breath 
control, phonation, and resonance, with emphasis on theatrical projection. Study 
and performance of musical theatre repertoire. (One hour per week). 

168v. Theatrical Singing II: Class Voice (1) Continuation of theatrical singing 
techniques with increased study and performance of musical theatre repertoire. 
P — Music 167v or permission of instructor. (One hour per week). 

190. Diction for Singers. (2) Study of articulation in singing, with emphasis on 
modification of English; pronunciation of Italian, German, and French. Develop- 
ment of articulatory and aural skills with use of the international phonetic alphabet. 
Individual performance and coaching in class. (Two hours per week). 



Philosophy 

Gregory D. Pritchard, Chairman 

Professors Robert M. Helm, Marcus B. Hester, Gregory D. Pritchard 

Associate Professor Charles M. Lewis 

Assistant Professor Ralph C. Kennedy III 

Visiting Assistant Professor Floyd Edwin Wike 

A major in philosophy requires thirty-six credits. The courses must include 261 
and either 161 or 271, two courses from the history sequence (201, 211, 222), and one 
course from each of the following: 230, 231, 241, 242, or 292; 275, 279, 282, 285, or 
287. In addition to these courses, a major in philosophy requires a "major paper," 
consisting of twenty-five or more type-written pages, to be submitted for a course, 
chosen by the student, from among philosophy courses taken during his or her last 
three semesters. This paper may also satisfy the term paper requirement for the 
course. 

A minor in philosophy requires six courses, one of which shall be either Philosophy 
111, 171, or 172. These courses are to be chosen in accordance with one of the 
following plans, each of which allows two general electives. Although plans A, B, and 
Care designed to complement majors in the specified areas, any one of the plans may 
be chosen by someone who wants to pursue other interests. 

(A) Art, Literature, and Religion (Bj Natural Science 

Philosophy of Art and/or Phi- Philosophy of Science; Logic 

losophy of Religion; one or and/or Symbolic Logic; one or 

more concentration courses more of the following: 201, 

(230, 231, 241, 242, 292); one 211, 222, 230, 231, 233, 241, 

or more of the following: 201, 275, 292. 
211, 222, 261, 275. 

(C) Social Science, Politics, and Law (D) Open Plan 

Ethics and/or Philosophy of With departmental approval, a 

Law; Logic and/or Symbolic fourth option will be available 

Logic; one or more of the fol- to students for whom none of 

lowing: 20 1,2 1 1,230, 23 1,241, the specified plans would be 

242, 275, 279, 287, 292. appropriate. 

The Spilman Philosophy Seminar, open to advanced students in philosophy, was 
established in 1934 through an endowment provided by Bernard W. Spilman. The 
income from the endowment is used for the seminar library, which now contains 
about 4,000 volumes. Additional support for the library and other departmental 
activities is provided by the A. C. Reid Philosophy Fund, which was established in 
1960 by friends of the department. The furniture in the library and seminar room 
was donated in honor of Claude V. Roebuck and Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Hough by their 
families. 

Two distinguished alumni of the College have made possible the establishment of a 
ectureship and a seminar. The late Guy T. Carswell endowed the Guy T. and Clara 



122 

Carswell Philosophy Lectureship, and a gift from James Montgomery Hester estah 
lished the Hester Philosophy Seminar. In addition, a lectureship bearing his namt 
has been instituted in honor of Claude V. Roebuck. 

Superior majors are invited by the department to apply for admission to the 
honors program in philosophy. To be graduated with the designation "Honors ir 
Philosophy," a qualified student must submit an acceptable prospectus for an honor: 
thesis by November for graduation in the spring semester or by May for graduation 
in the fall semester, present a satisfactory paper based on the prospectus, (as judgec 
bv the student's honors adviser and at least one other member of the department) 
and show an acceptable level of performance in a discussion of the paper with th< 
honors adviser and at least one other member of the department. In lieu of a 
prospectus, the student's "major paper" may be submitted, provided that this occur; 
in the semester before the semester in which he or she is to graduate and provider 
that the paper is re-written in view of criticism and additional research materials a. 
appropriate for an honors paper. 

111. Basic Problems of Philosophy. (4) An examination of the basic concepts o r 
several representative philosophers, including their accounts of the nature of know 
ledge, man, God, mind, and matter. 

161. Logic. (4) An elementary study of the laws of valid inference, recognition o' 
fallacies, and logical analvsis. 

171, 172. Meaning and Value in Western Thought. (4, 4) A critical survey d 
religious and philosophical ideas in the Western world from antiquity to moderi 
times. Either Philosoph v 1 7 1 or 1 72 satisfies the philosophy or religion requirement 
both 171 and 172 satisfy both the philosophy and religion requirements; choic 1 
determined at registration. 

182. Medical Ethics. (4) A studv of moral problems in medicine including informed 
consent, experimentation on human subjects, truth-telling, confidentiality, abortior 
euthanasia, and the allocation of scarce medical resources. P — Philosophy 111, 171 
or 172. 

20 1 . Ancient and Medieval Philosophy. (4) A study of philosophical problems sue] 
as the nature of faith, reason, universals. and God in the thought of Plato, AristouV 
Augustine, Abelard, Anselm, Aquinas, and Ockham. P — Philosophy 111, 171, 

172. 

211. Modern Philosophy. (4) A survey of major philosophers from Descartes ti 

Nietzsche. P — Philosophy 111, 171, or 172. 

222. Contemporary Philosophy. (4) A survey of major philosophers from Russell tl 
Sartre. P— Philosophy 111, 171, or 172. 

225. American Philosophy. (4) A study exploring the philosophies of Jonatha: 
Edwards, Ralph Waldo Emerson, C. S. Pierce, William James, John Dewey, an 
others, examining their views on logic, experience, science, reality, nature, ar 
education, and God. P — 1 11. 171, or 172. 

230. Plato. (4) A detailed analysis of selected dialogues, covering Plato's most impo: 



123 



:ant contributions to ethics, political philosophy, theory of knowledge, metaphysics, 
ind theology. P — Philosophy 111, 171, or 172. 

231. Aristotle. (4) A study of the major texts, with emphasis on metaphysics, ethics, 
ind theory of knowledge. P — Philosophy 111, 171, or 172. 

!33. Space and Time in Fact and Fiction. (4) Are space and time fundamentally 
iifferent? Are they properties of the physical world or of minds only? Are they finite 
ir infinite in extension and duration? Other questions cover problems and para- 
loxes in the concept of space and in the concept of time travel. P — Philosophy 111, 
[71, or 172. Not open to students who have credit for Philosophy 133. 

241. Kant. (4) A detailed study of selected works covering Kant's most important 
contributions to theory of knowledge, metaphysics, ethics, and religion. P — 
Philosophy 111, 171, or 172. 

!42. Hegel, Kierkegaard, and Nietzsche. (4) An examination of selected sources 
embodying the basic concepts of Hegel, Kierkegaard, and Nietzsche, especially as 
hey relate to each other in terms of influence, development, and opposition. P — 
Philosophy 1 1 1. 171, or 172. 

258. Wittgenstein. (4) An examination of the work of Ludwig Wittgenstein on 
;everal central philosophical problems is studied and compared with that of Frege, 
[ames, and Russell. Topics include the picture theory of meaning, truth, scepticism, 
arivate languages, thinking, feeling, the mystical, and ethical. P — Philosophy 111, 
171, or 172. 

261. Ethics. (4) A critical study of selected problems and representative works in 
nhical theory. P— Philosophy ill, 171, or 172. 

571. Symbolic Logic. (4) Basic concepts and techniques of modern deductive logic, 
aeginning with the logic of truth-functions and quantifiers, and including some 
iiscussion of such topics as Church's thesis and theorem, the completeness of 
first-order logic, and Godel's incompleteness theorems. 

275. Philosophy of Mind. (4) A selection from the folowing topics: the mind-body 
problem; personal identity; the unity of consciousness; minds and machines; the 
fiature of experience; action, intention and the will. Readings from classical and 
contemporary sources. P — Philosophy 111, 171, or 172. 

279. Philosophy of Science. (4) A systematic exploration of the conceptual founda- 
tions of scientific thought and procedure. P — Philosophy 111, 171, or 172. 

282. Philosophy of Law. (4) A philosophical inquiry into the nature of law and its 
relation to morality. Classroom discussions of readings from the works of classical 
ind modern authors focus on issues of contemporary concern involving questions of 
( egal principle, personal liberty, human rights, responsibility, justice, and punish- 
ment. P— Philosophy 111, 171, or 172. 

J285. Philosophy of Art. (4) A critical examination of several philosophies of art, with 
:mphasis upon the application of these theories to particular works of art. P — 
philosophy 1 1 1, 171, or 172. 



124 



287. Philosophy of Religion. (4) A systematic analysis of the logical structure of! 
religious language and belief, including an examination of religious experience, 
mysticism, revelation, and arguments for the nature and existence of God. P — 
Philosophy 111, 171, or 172. 

294. Seminar in Epistemological Problems. (4) P — Philosophy 111, 171, or 172. 

295. Seminar in Metaphysical Problems. (4) P — Philosophy 111, 171, or 172. 

296. Independent Study. (2, 4). 

Physical Education 

William L. Hottinger, Chairman 

Professors William L. Hottinger, Paul M. Ribisl 

Assistant Professors Dorothy Casey, Leo Ellison, Stephen Messier, 

Walter Rejeski 

Visiting Assistant Professor Sarah D. Hutslar 

Instructors Susan E. Balinsky, Donald Bergey, Gary Hall, Rebecca Myers 

The purpose of the Department of Physical Education is to organize, administer,; 
and supervise (1) a professional education program which prepares students interested; 
in the field of physical education; (2) a required/elective physical education program: 
consisting of conditioning activities, dance, and individual and team sports; and (3)| 
an intramural sports program which provides a wide variety of competitive activities. 

Physical Education Requirement 

All entering students are required to complete two semesters of physical educa- 1 
tion: Physical Education 111, Foundations of Health and Physical Fitness, and one' 
additional course selected from the 100-series of physical education courses. The 
requirement must be met before enrollment in additional courses for electives. It is! 
recommended that the requirement be completed by the end of the student's first 
year; it must be completed by the end of the second year. 

Courses in Basic Instruction and Elective Physical Education 

111. Foundations of Health and Physical Fitness 

112. Sports Proficiency 

113. Adaptive Physical Education 

114. Weight Control 

115. Physical Conditioning 

116. Weight Training 

119. Aerobic Dancing 

120. Beginning Dance Technique 

121 . Intermediate Dance Technique (P — Physical Education 120 or permission of instructor) 

122. Advanced Dance Technique (P — Physical Education 121 or permission of instructor) 

123. Dance Composition (P — Physical Education 121) 

124. Social Dance 



125 



Folk and Social Dance 

Jazz Dance 

Beginning Tumbling! Free Exercise 

Intermediate Tumbling/Free Exercise 

Beginning Gymnastic Apparatus 

Intermediate Gymnastic Apparatus 

Aero-Sports 

Beginning Swimming 

Intermediate/ Advanced Swimming 

Water Ballet/ Synchronized Swimming 

Springboard Diving 

Advanced Lifesaving and Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (P — Strong swimming 

ability) 

Water Safety Instructor's Course (P — Current advanced lifesaving certification) 

Beginning Tennis 

Intermediate Tennis 

Advanced Tennis (P — Physical Education 151 or permission of instructor) 

Begin n ing/Intermedia te B adm inton 

Beginning Squash Racquets 

Beginning Racketball 

Intermediate Racketball 

Beginning Golf 

Intermediate Golf 

Archery 

Bowling 

Beginning/Intermediate Handball 

Recreational Games 

Volleyball 

Soccer 

Wrestling 

Fencing 

Beginning Horseback Riding 

Intermediate/Advanced Horseback Riding 

Snow Skiing 

Beginning Ice Figure Skating 

Intermediate/Advanced Ice Figure Skating 

Karate 

Yoga 



Courses for the Major and Minor 

Students desiring to elect a major in physical education must be of junior standing, 
■iology 1 1 1 and 150 are required. Three tracks are available to majors in physical 
ducation, they are general physical education, teacher certification, and exercise 
:ience. All tracks require the following core of courses in physical education: 111, 



126 

■ : 

212, 230, 250, 352, 353, 360, three beginning 100-level courses and two intermedi- 
ate/advanced 100-level courses. 

Students in the general track must take the following courses in physical education.) 
222, 224, 251, plus at least two courses from the following: 220, 226, 240, 310, 363, 
and 370. Students in the teacher certification track must take the following courses in 
physical education: 125, 222, 224, 226, 240, 251, and 363. Students in the exercise 1 
science track must take Physical Education 215 and 370 plus a ten-hour science 
sequence in biology (beyond 111-150), chemistry, mathematics, or physics. The 
science sequence will be determined in consultation with the major adviser. Physical 
Education 382 is recommended, but not required. 

Students desiring a minor must take the following courses in physical education; 
111,212,230, 250, 352,353, three beginning 1 00-level courses and either 226 or twc 
intermediate/advanced 100-level courses. 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to apply for admission to the 
honors program in physical education. Upon successfully meeting specifically out-j 
lined requirements, they are recommended for graduation with "Honors in Physical 
Education." Consult an adviser in the Physical Education Department for an outline 
of the requirement. 

Any student interested in majoring in physical education should consult the. 
chairman of the department as soon as possible after entering the University. 

201. Outdoor Exploration. (2) Introduction to various outdoor recreational and 
survival skills. 

205. Basic Skin and Scuba Diving and Open Water Certification. (2) A course in skin 
and SCUBA diving that offers international certification bv the Professional Associa-, 
tion of Diving Instructors (PADI). 

208. Current Topics in Sports Psychology. (2) A survey of the field with an emphasis 
on current topics. Students may not receive credit for both 208 and 212. 

212. The Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity. (4) An examination of the 
social-psychological foundations of sport and exercise related phenomena. Attention, 
is given to performance as well as mental health issues in these domains. The topics, 
discussed include coach-athlete interactions, youth sport, the profile of elite per- 
formers, women in sport, and compliance to exercise programs. 

215. Laboratory Techniques in Excerise Science. (2) A laboratory course designed 
to acquaint the student with standard techniques of measurement in exercise science 
(i.e., anthropometry, body composition, energv metabolism, work ergometrv, etc.) in 
the study of the phvsiologic response to exercise. P — Physical Education 353. 

220. Methods and Materials in Aquatics. (2) Presentation of knowledge, skill, and 
methods of teaching aquatics. 

222. Sports Activities I. (2) A development of theory and skill in selected sports 
(volleyball, softball, soccer). 

223. Health and Physical Education for the Intermediate Grades. (4) The develop^ 
ment of physical education skills appropriate for the intermediate grade teacher and 



127 



an understanding of the personal and community health needs appropriate for the 
grade level. 

224. Sports Activities II. (2) A development of theory and skill in selected sports 
(tennis, gymnastics, wrestling, or badminton). P — Physical Education 130 or 132. 

226. Sports Activities and Methods of Teaching. (3) A development of theory and 
iskill in selected sports and methods of class administration (baseball, track and field, 
Imethods of teaching). 

230. First Aid and Athletic Training. (2) A study of first aid techniques and the care 
and treatment of athletic injuries. 

240. Physical Education for Pre-School and Elementary School. (3) A study of the 
[developmental stages of fundamental motor skills and a presentation of methods of 
teaching physical education activities to the pre-school and elementary school child. 

^250. Principles of Physical Education and Motor Learning. (3) A study of the 
principles and foundations of the field of physical education, with emphasis on 
^learning theories important to psychomotor development. 

[251. Organization and Administration. (3) A study of organization and administra- 
ftion of physical education and athletic programs. 

310. Applied Field Study. (2) A course involving application of theory and methods 
j'of solving problems in a specialized area according to the student's immediate career 
[goals. P — Physical Education 250 or permission of instructor. 

1352. Anatomy and Kinesiology. (5) A study of the principles of human motion based 
on the functional knowledge of the anatomical structure of the human body. 

1353. Physiology of Exercise. (4) The course presents the many effects of muscular 
activity on the processes of the body which constitute the scientific basis of physical 
education. 

r360. Evaluation and Measurement in Health and Physical Education. (3) A course 
in measurement techniques and beginning statistical procedures to determine pupil 
status in established standards of health and physical education which reflect the 
prevailing educational philosophy. 

363. Health and Adapted Physical Education. A study of personal and community 
Ihealth needs of school age children and methods of administering physical education 
[programs for special students. 

370. Advanced Anatomy and Biomechanics. (5) An advanced study of the anatomi- 
:al structure and the biomechanical principles involved in human motion. Labora- 
:ory study will include cadaver dissection and analysis of movement. P — Physical 
Education 352. 

382. Individual Study in Health and Physical Education. ( 1-4) Library conferences 
ind laboratory research performed on an individual basis. 



128 

Physics 

George P. Williams Jr., Chairman 

Professors Robert W. Brehme, Ysbrand Haven, Howard W. Shields, 

George P. Williams Jr. 

Associate Professor William C. Kerr 

Assistant Professor George Eric Matthews 

The program of courses for each student majoring in physics is developed throug 
consultation with the student's major adviser and may lead to either a Bachelor q 
Arts or a Bachelor of Science degree. The B.A. degree requires a minimum of basi 
physics courses and allows a wide selection of electives related to the student 
interests in other disciplines. The B.S. degree is designed to prepare students fo 
careers in phvsics, perhaps beginning with graduate study. 

The Bachelor of Arts degree in physics requires thirty-seven credits in phvsics anl 
must include courses 161, 162, 345, and two from 230, 352, and 351. The Bachelor c| 
Science degree in phvsics requires forty-five credits in phvsics and must includ 
courses 311,312, 343, 344, 345, and 346. In special cases the department may allo'| 
substitutions. For either degree, two courses in chemistry or the equivalent an ( 
Mathematics 251 are required. 

A typical schedule for the first two years: 

Freshman Sophomore 

Basic and divisional requirements Basic and divisional requirements 

Physics 111, 1 1 2 or 121, 122 (five courses) 

Mathematics 111, 112 Phvsics 161. 162 

Foreign Language Mathematics 251 

If this sequence is followed, the phvsics major mav be completed in such a way as 
allow considerable flexibilitv in exercising various options, such as the five-yei 
B.A./M.S. program. (For information about this program, consult the departmel 
chairman.) This saves time, and the outstanding student may qualify for a tuitic 
scholarship in the senior year of the five-year program. 

A minor in physics requires twenty-four credits including Physics 111-112 c 
121-122. 161, and 162. Students interested in the minor should so advise tl 
instuctor of 161 or 162. 

If Physics 111, 112 or 121, 122 is not taken in the freshman year, one of tl 
sequences mav be taken in the sophomore year; the degree requirements in physi 
mav still be completed bv the end of the senior year. No student mav be a Candida 
for a degree with a major in phvsics with a grade less than C in general physi: 
without special permission of the department. 

Satisfactory completion of the laboratorv work is required for a passing grade in i 
courses with a laboratory. 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to applv for admission to tl 
honors program in physics. To be graduated with the designation "Honors 
Phvsics," students must complete satisfactorilv Phvsics 38 1 and pass a comprehensi 
written examination. For additional information on these programs or on the e 



29 



gineering program the chairman or a member of the departmental faculty should be 
consulted. 

101. Conceptual Physics. (5) A non-mathematical introduction to the essential 
principles of classical and modern physics based on a conceptual treatment of the 
more exciting contemporary aspects of the subject. Credit not allowed for both 101 
and 111. Lab) — two hours. 

104. Introductory Physics for Teachers. (3 or 4) No lab. Does not satisfy Division II 
requirements. 

105. Descriptive Astronomy. (4) An introductory study of the universe, from the 
solar system to the galaxies. No lab. Does not satisfy Division II requirements. 

106. Physics and the Sounds of Music. (3 or 4) A study of the production, propaga- 
tion, and perception of musical sounds. Satisfies no divisional requirements. No 
prerequisites; no lab. 

108. Energy and the Environment. (2) A descriptive, non-mathematical introduction 
to the concept of energv and its role in the environment. Does not satisfv Division II 
requirements. 

Ill, 112. Introductory Physics. (5, 5) Essentials of mechanics, wave motion, heat, 
sound, electricitv, magnetism, optics, and modern phvsics for freshmen and sopho- 
mores. Lab — two hours. 

121, 122. General Physics. (5, 5) A course designed for those who expect to major in 
physics or chemistry. A calculus treatment of the topics covered in 111, 112. A 
student may not receive credit for both this course and Physics 111, 112. Lab — two 
hours. C — Mathematics 111. 

,141. Elementary Modern Physics. (4) The development of twentieth century physics 
and an introduction to quantum ideas. P — Physics 1 12 or 121; C — Mathematics 1 12. 

161. Applied Mechanics. (5) The fundamental principles of mechanics. Lab — three 
hours. Offered in the spring of even-numbered years. P — Physics 111 or 121 and 
Mathematics 1 1 1 or equivalent. 

162. Introductory Electricity. (5) The fundamental principles of electricity, mag- 
netism, and electromagnetic radiation. Lab — three hours. P — Phvsics 112; C — 
Mathematics 1 12. 

[230. Electronics. (4) Introduction to the theory and application of transistors and 
[electronic circuits. Lab — three hours. Offered in the fall of odd-numbered years. P — 
physics 162 or equivalent. 

301, 302. Physics Seminar. (0, 0) Discussion of contemporary research, usually with 
"visiting scientists. Attendance required of junior and senior physics majors. 

.311. Mechanics. (4) A junior/senior level treatment of analytic classical mechanics. 
P — Mathematics 251. 

r312. Electromagnetic Theory. (4) Ajunior/senior level treatment of classical electro- 
(magnetic theory. P — Physics 162 and Mathematics 251. 



130 



331, 332. Acoustics I, II. (4. 4) A study of the fundamental principles and applica- 
tions of the generation, transmission, and reception ol sound and its interaction with 
various media. 

343, 344. Modern Physics. (4, 4) Application of the elementary principles of quan- 
tum mechanics to atomic and molecular physics. 

345, 346. Modern Physics Laboratory. (1. 1) The laboratory associated withl 
Physics 343, 344. Lab — three hours. 

351. Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics. (4.4) Introduction to classical and 
statistical thermodynamics and distribution functions. Offered in the spring of odd- 
numbered years. 

352. Physical Optics and Spectra. (5) A study of physical optics and the quantum 
treatment of spectra. Lab — three hours. Offered in the fall of even-numbered years. 

381. Research. (4) Library, conference, and laboratory work performed on an. 
individual basis. 



Politics 

Richard D. Sears, Chairman 

Professors Jack D. Fleer, C. H. Richards Jr., 

Professor of History and Asian Studies Balkrishna Govind Gokhale 

Associate Professors David B. Broyles, Carl C. Moses, 

Jon M. Reinhardt, Donald O. Schoonmaker, Richard D. Sears 

Visiting Assistant Professor Kathleen B. Smith 

Assistant Professor Robert L. Utley 

In its broadest conception, the aim of the study of politics is to understand the way 
in which policy for a society is formulated and executed and to understand the moral 
standards bv which policy is or ought to be set. This center of interest is often) 
described alternatively as the study of power, of government, of the state, or oi 
human relations in their political context. For teaching purposes, the study of politics; 
has been divided bv the department into the following fields: (1) American politics.: 
(2) comparative politics, (3) political philosophy, and (4) international politics. Intro- 
ductory courses in the first three of these fields provide broad and flexible 
approaches to studying political life. 

The major in politics consists of thirtv-six credits. The courses must include the 
following: (a) a first course selected from Politics 113, 114. or 115; (b) any one 
introductory or advanced course in each of the four fields of the discipline, restricted 
to non-seminar courses; (c) one seminar in politics (usually a student takes no morei 
than one seminar in each field and no more than three seminars overall). A minimum 
grade average of C on all courses attempted in politics is required for graduation 
Majors should consult with their advisers concerning additional regulations. 

Highly qualified majors are invited bv the department to apply for admission to the 
honors program in politics. To be graduated with the designation "Honors in 
Politics," one must successfully complete Politics 284 and 285. Politics 284 and 285 



131 



nust be taken as additional courses beyond the thirty-six credits ordinarily required. 
For additional information members of the departmental faculty should be con- 
sulted. 

The minor in politics requires five courses, ordinarily including Politics 1 13 but 
excluding Individual Study and seminar courses. Four of the five courses must be 
taken at Wake Forest and any transfer courses must be approved by the chairman. 
None of the five courses may be taken pass/fail. 

A student who selects politics to fulfill the Division IV requirement must take one 
pf the following courses: Politics 1 13, 1 14, or 1 15. No introductory level course is 
required for students taking a politics course as an elective unless such a prerequisite 
s specified in the course description. 

Introductory Courses 

j A student may take any one of the following as the first course in the department; 
more than one mav be taken. Ordinarilv a student is expected to take Politics 1 13 as 
:he first course. 

113. Introduction to Politics: American Politics. (4) The nature of politics, political 
principles, and political institutions, with emphasis on their application to the United 
States. 

114. Introduction to Politics: Comparative Politics. (4) Political processes and 
principles as applied to traditional, developing, and mature states. 

115. Introduction to Politics: Political Theory. (4) Major systematic statements of 
:he rules and principles of political life. Representative writers are Tocqueville, Dahl, 
and Aristotle. 

American Politics 

210. Public Policy Analysis. (4) Analysis of the substance of public problems and 
policy alternatives. Examination of why government pursues certain policies and the 
consequences of those policies. 

211. Political Parties and Voting Behavior. (4) An examination of party competi- 
tion, party organizations, the electorate and electoral activities of parties, and the 
responsibilities of parties for governing. 

213. Public Administration. (4) Introduction to the study of public administration 
Emphasizing policy-making in government agencies. 

218. Congress and Policy-Making. (4) An examination of the composition, authority 
Structures, external influences, and procedures of Congress with emphasis on their 
implications for policy-making in the United States. 

220. The American Presidency. (4) Emphasis on the office and the role; contribu- 
tions by contemporary presidents considered in perspective. 

222. Urban Problems and Politics. (4) Political structures and processes in American 
ities and suburbs as they relate to the social, economic, and political problems of the 
netropolis. 



132 



225. American Constitutional Law: Separation of Powers and the Federal System. 

(4) An analysis of Supreme Court decisions affecting the three branches of thei 
national government and federal/state relations. 

226. American Constitutional Law: Civil Liberties. (4) Judicial interpretations of 
First Amendment freedoms, racial equality, and the rights of the criminally accused. 

227. Politics, Law, and the Legal Process. (4) Analysis of the nature and possible 
sources of law, the proper role of law in social change, structure and process in the 
legal svstem, and the impact of legally decided policies on society, including their 
propensity for justice and fairness in American democratic society. 



Comparative Politics 

231. Western European Politics. (4) Analysis of the political systems of Great Britain,! 
France, and Italy, focusing primarily on the problems of stable democracy. 

232. Government and Politics in the Soviet Union. (4) Analysis of the institutions' 
and processes of politics in the USSR and examination of political developments in; 
the other states of Eastern Europe. 

233. The Politics of West and East Germany. (4) A study of the political behavior and' 
governmental institutions of the capitalist democratic regime of West Germany and 
the authoritarian socialist regime of East Germany. 

234. Goverment and Politics in East Asia. (4) An analysis of the political institutions 
and processes in China and Japan, with emphasis on the problem of modernization.! 

235. The Politics of Revolution. (4) The comparative studv of revolution as a 
historical phenomenon and as an alternative means of change in the contemporary 
world. Analysis of the nature, the background and causes, the processes, the 
varieties, and the consequences of revolution, and an attempt to assess the capabilities! 
or potential of some current movements purporting to be revolutionary. Some! 
revolutions receiving particular attention are those of England, France, Russia, 
Mexico, Cuba, and China, and some broad movements included are the New Left 
and contemporary anarchism in the United States and Western Europe. 

236. Government and Politics in Latin America. (4) Comparative analysis of the: 
institutions and processes of politics in the Latin American region. 

238. History, Culture, and Political Change. (4) The study of how major cultures 
articulate or symbolize their existence either in history or moving through history. 
Special attention given to an evaluation of current concepts applied to political 
change. 

239. Comparative Bureaucratic Elites. (4) An investigation of the role of top civil 
servants in the decision-making process of industrialized political systems. The 
dilemma of bureaucratic power and democratic accountability explored in the po- 
litical systems of the United States. West Germany, Great Britain. France, Italy, and 
one of the Scandinavian countries. 



133 



{42. Problems in Comparative Politics. (4) An intensive study of one or more major 
oroblems in contemporary comparative politics. 

245. Government and Politics of South Asia. (4) A study of the governments of 
tndia, Pakistan, Nepal, and Ceylon. Emphasis on political organizations, party struc- 
ures, and subnational governmental systems. 

International Politics 

251. Fundamentals of International Politics. (4) Fundamental theoretical questions 
pf international politics, with special emphasis on existing international patterns. 

252. Current Problems in International Politics. (4) An intensive study of one or 
nore major problems of contemporary international politics. 

253. The Politics of International Economic Relations. (4) A study of the emer- 
gence of international economic transactions, including trade, monetary affairs, 
nvestment, and multinational corporations, as a central aspect of world politics. 

254. American Foreign Policy: Contemporary Problems. (4) A critical examination 
|)f different methods of stitching American foreign policy and of selected policies 
followed bv the United States since the early 1960s. 

255. American Foreign Policy: The Cold War Period. (4) A critical examination of 
the forces which shape American foreign policy and of selected policies followed 
fom World War II to the Cuban Missile Crisis. 

Political Philosophy 

271. Plato, Aristotle, and Classical Political Philosophy. (4) An examination of the 
fiature and goals of the classical position, with attention to its origins in ancient 
Athens and its diffusion through Rome. Representative writers are Plato, Aristotle, 
and Cicero. 

272. Equality and Liberty. (4) The arguments for and against democracy and 

republicanism, majority rule, and the rights of man. Representative writers are 
Rousseau and Mill. 

273. Radical Critiques of Political Society. (4) Anarchist, socialist, and communist 
criticisms of and alternatives to existing political societies, with special attention to 
itich problems as utopianism and alienation. Representative writers are Marx and 
Nietzsche. 

274. Noble Greeks and Romans. (4) A study of statesmanship in the speeches and 
actions of selected major figures. Theory manifested in practice. Representative 
Writers are Shakespeare and Plutarch. 

275. Theory of the American Polity. (4) Critical examination of the nature ol the 
American polity as expressed by its founders and leading statesmen. Representative 
writers are the Federalists, Lincoln, and Wilson. Does not meet theory distribution 
Requirement for majors. 



134 



276. Medieval Political Philosophy. (4) Philosophy and religion in cooperation and 
conflict. Emphasis on Christian writers with some attention to Muslim and Jewish. 
Representative writers are Aquinas, Dante, and Maimonides. 

278. Foundations of Modern Political Philosophy. (4) An examination of the 
essential writings of thinkers who broke with the past in an attempt to establish a 
more "realistic" approach to the study of politics. Representative writers are I 
Machiavelli, Hobbes, and Locke. 




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135 



Honors and Individual Study 

284. Honors Study. (2) Directed study and research in preparation for a major paper 
on a subject of special interest to the student. Taken in the fall semester of the senior 
year by all candidates for departmental honors. 

285. Honors Study. (3) Directed study toward completion of the project begun in 
Politics 284 and to the writing and defense of an honors paper. Taken in the spring 
semester of the senior year bv all candidates for departmental honors. P — Politics 

! 284. 

287. Individual Study. (2, 3, or 4) Internships, work/study projects, and other 
j individual study programs. 

Seminars 

291. Seminar in American Politics. (4) Readings, research, and independent study 
on selected topics. P — Permission of instructor. 

! 292. Seminar in Comparative Politics. (4) Readings, research, and independent 
study on selected topics. P — Permission of instructor. 

I 293. Seminar in International Politics. (4) Readings, research, and independent 
' study on selected topics. P — Permission of instructor. 

i 294. Seminar in Political Philosophy. (4) Readings, research, and independent 
study on selected topics. P — Permission of instructor. 

Psychology 

John E. Williams, Chairman 

Professors Robert C. Beck, Robert H. Dufort, Charles L. Richman 

John E. Williams 

Associate Professors David W. Catron, Philippe R. Falkenberg, 

David Allen Hills 

Assistant Professors Deborah L. Best, Jerry M. Burger, Maxine L. Clark, 

Cecilia H. Solano 

Adjunct Associate Professor Frank B. Wood 

Visiting Assistant Professors C. Drew Edwards, Jean C. Seeman 

Adjunct Instructors Catherine A. Jourdan, Sam T. Manoogian, David S. Stump 

Psychology 151 is prerequisite to all courses of a higher number. Courses num- 
bered below 151 do not count toward Division IV requirements or toward the major 
in psychology. Psychology 2 1 1 , or special permission of the instructor, is prerequisite 
for all 300-level courses except 313, 335, 344, 358, and 367. 

It is recommended that students who are considering psychology as a major take 
Psychology 151 in their freshman year and Psychology 211 in the fall of their 
sophomore year. An average of C or higher in psychology courses is required at the 
time the major is elected. The major in psychology requires the completion of a 
minimum of forty credits in psychology, including 151, 211, 212, and 313. In 



136 



addition, the major student must complete one course from each of the following 
groups: 320, 326, 329, and 333; 341, 351, 355, and 362. No more than forty-eight; 
psychology credits may be counted toward the graduation requirements. 

The minor in psychology requires twenty credits in psychology, distributed as 
follows: 151 (4 credits); 211(5 credits); at least one of the following courses: 320, 326,: 
329, 333 (4 credits each); and seven additional credits in courses numbered 200 or'j 
above. 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to participate in the honors' 
program in psychology. To be graduated with the designation "Honors in Psy- 
chology," the student must complete satisfactorily a special sequence of courses (381,: 
383) and pass an oral or written examination. In addition, the honors student 
normally has a non-credit research apprenticeship with a faculty member. For more 
detailed information members of the departmental faculty should be consulted. 

100. Learning to Learn. (2, 3 or 4) A workshop to help people improve their learning 
skills through the application of basic principles of learning, remembering, and so 
forth. Students at all levels welcomed. No prerequisite. Pass/Fail only. 

102. Exploration of Career Planning. (2, 3 or 4) Examination of educational/ 
vocational planning as a personal process, based on knowledge of self and the work 
world. No prerequisite. 

151. Introductory Psychology. (4) A systematic survey of psychology as the scientific 
study of behavior. Prerequisite to all courses of a higher number. 

211, 212. Research Methods in Psychology. (5, 5) Introduction to the design and 
statistical analysis of psychological research. Lab — twice weekly. P — Psychology 151. 

239. Altered States of Consciousness. (4) Examination of altered states of conscious- 
ness with special reference to sleep and dreams, meditation, hypnosis, and drugs. 
P — Psychology 151. 

241. Developmental Psychology. (4) Survey of physical, emotional, cognitive, and 
social development in humans from conception to death. P — Psychology 151. 

245. Survey of Abnormal Behavior. (4) Studv of problem behaviors such as depres- 
sion, alcoholism, antisocial personality, the schizophrenias, and pathogenic personal- 
ity patterns, with emphasis on causes, prevention, and the relationships of these 
disorders to normal lifestyles. P — Psychology 151. 

250. Psychology Abroad. (4) The study of psychology in foreign countries. Content 
and travel plans vary from year to year depending upon interests of faculty and- 
students. Usually offered in summer. P — Psychology 151. 

255. Theories of Personality. (4) A comparative study of classical and contemporary! 
theories of human personality. P — Psychology 151. 

260. Social Psychology. (4) A survey of the field, including theories of social 
behavior, interpersonal attraction, attitudes and attitude change, and group be- 
havior. P — Psychology 151. 

265. Human Sexuality: A Changing Scene. (4) An exploration of the psychological; 



137 

and physiological aspects of human sexuality, with attention to changing sexual 
mores, sexual deviances, sexual dysfunction, and sex-related roles. P — Psychology 
151. 

1 268. Psychology of Business and Industry. (4) Psychological principles and methods 
; applied to problems commonly encountered in business and industry. P — 
! Psychology 151. 

270. Topics in Psychology. (1,2, or 3) The student selects from among a group of 
I short one-credit courses dealing with topics of special interest. The courses meet 
1 sequentially, not concurrently, and options are offered in each portion of the semes- 
ter. P — Psychology 151. 

, 270A Aggression 270K Psychology and Politics 

| 270D Brain/Behavior Relations 270L Sex Stereotypes and Roles 

! 270E Emotion 270M The Gifted and Creative Person 

' 270H Intelligence 27 ON Liking and Loving Relationships 

2701 Race and Young Children 270P Animal Flying Behavior 

1 270] Memory 

280. Directed Study. (1—4) Student research performed under faculty supervision. 

i P — Psychology 151 and approval of faculty member prior to registration. 

313. History and Systems of Psychology. (4) The development of psychological 
thought and research from ancient Greece to present trends, with emphasis on 
j intensive examination of original sources. P — Psychology 151. 

320. Physiological Psychology. (4) Neurophysiological and neuroanatomical ex- 
planations of behavior. P — Psychology 21 1 or permission of instructor. 

323. Animal Behavior. (4) A survey of laboratory and field research on animal 
behavior. This course may count as biology or psychology but not both; choice to be 
determined at registration. P — Permission of instructor. 

326. Learning Theory and Research. (4) Survey of concepts and research in learn- 
ing, with particular emphasis on recent developments. P — Psychology 211. 

329. Perception. (4) Survey of theory and research findings on various sensory 
systems (vision, hearing, touch, taste). P — Psychology 211. 

333. Motivation of Behavior. (4) Survey of basic motivational concepts and related 
evidence. P — Psychology 211. 

335. Fundamentals of Human Motivation. (4) Description and analysis of some 
fundamental motivational phenomena, with special reference to human problems; 
includes reward and punishment, conflict anxiety, affection, needs for achievement 
and power, aggression, creativity, and curiosity. P — Psychology 151. 

341. Research in Child Development. (4) Methodological issues and selected re- 
search in child development. Research projects required. P — Psychology 211. 

342. Current Issues in Developmental Psychology. (4) Intensive examination of 
selected theoretical or research issues in this area. P — Psychology 211 and 241. 

343. Developmental Disorders. (2) Delayed or distorted neural development stud- 



138 

ied in relation to major disturbances of learning and behavior in children and in the 
aging. P — Psychology 211. 

344. Abnormal Psychology. (4) Descriptive analysis of the major types of abnormal 
behavior with attention to organic, psychological, and cultural causes and major 
modes of therapy. Offered in the summer. P — Psychology 151. 

351. Personality Research. (4) The application of a variety of research procedures to 
the study of human personality. Research projects required. P — Psychology 211. 

355. Research in Social Psychology. (4) Methodological issues and selected research 
in the study of the human as a social animal. Research projects required. P — 
Psychology 211. 

358. Psychology of Woman. (4) Intensive study of the behavior of women and its 
personal application, including consideration of biological, social, and motivational 
factors. P — Psychology 151. 

361. Operant Conditioning and Behavior Modification. (4) Principles, theory, and 1 
experimental research in operant learning, with applications to the modification of 
behavior in various populations and situations, P — Psychology 211. 

362. Psychological Tests and Measurements. (4) Theory and application of psycho- 
logical assessment procedures in the areas of intelligence, aptitude, vocational 
interest, and personalitv. P — Psvchology 211. 

363. Survey of Clinical Psychology. (4) An overview of the field of clinical psycholo- 
gy. P — Psychology 245 and senior standing or permission of instructor. 

367. Effectiveness in Parent/Child Relations. (4) A survev of popular approaches to 
child-rearing, with examination of the research literature on parent/child interaction 
and actual training in parental skills. P — Psychology 151. 

369. Contemporary Applications of Psychology. (4) Supervised field experience in 
applied psychology. P — Psychology 151 and permission of instructor. 

378. Instrumentation for Psychological Research. (2 — 1) Lecture/demonstration) 
presentation of electrical and mechanical equipment, followed by practical applica- 
tion in small group project work. Assumes no prior knowledge of electricity or 
construction. P — Permission of instructor. 

381. Honors Seminar. (3) Seminar on selected problems in psychology. Intended 
primarily for students in the departmental honors program. P — Psychology 21 1 and 
permission of instructor. 

383. Honors Research. (3) Seminar in selected issues in research design, followed by 
independent empirical research under the supervision of a member of the depart- 
mental faculty. P — Psychology 212 and permission of instructor. 

392. Contemporary Problems in Psychology. (4) Seminar treatment of current 
theory and research in several "frontier" areas of psychology. Principallv for senior 
majors planning to attend graduate school. P — Psychology 211 and senior standing. 



139 



Religion 

Carlton T. Mitchell, Chairman 

Professors John William Angell, George McLeod Bryan, Robert Allen Dyer, 

Emmett Willard Hamrick, Carlton T. Mitchell, 

Charles H. Talbert 

Adjunct Professor Jerome R. Dollard 

Associate Professors John E. Collins, Fred L. Horton Jr., Ralph C. Wood Jr. 

Instructor Murdina D. MacDonald 

Visiting Lecturers Thomas E. Dougherty Jr. 

The department offers courses designed to give every student an opportunity to 
acquire at least an introduction to the life, literature, and most important movements 
in the field of religion. It also seeks to give the students preparing for specialized 
service as religious education directors, ministers, and missionaries the foundational 
courses needed for further study. 

A course in religion is required for all degrees. Any course offered by the depart- 
ment is accepted to meet the requirement except for 218, 237, 240, 266, 270, 273, 
282, 286, 287, 292, and 346. 

A major in religion requires a minimum of thirty-two credits, at least half of which 
must be in courses above the 100 level. 

A minor in religion requires five courses (twenty credits), two of which must be 
above the 100 level. The required courses may include one pass/fail course if the 
course is offered on the pass/fail basis only. The department will provide advisers for 
students electing the minor in religion. 

Pre-ministerial students are advised to include in their program of studv, in 
addition to courses in religion, courses in psychology, ancient historv, public speak- 
ing, and two languages (Greek or Latin and German or French). 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to apply for admission to the 
honors program in religion. To be graduated with the designation "Honors in 
Religion," they must apply to the chairman of the department for admission to the 
honors program, normally by February of the junior year. Upon completion of all 
the requirements the candidate is graduated with "Honors in Religion." For addi- 
tional information members of the departmental faculty should be consulted. 

111. Introduction to the Old Testament. (4) A survey of the Old Testament designed 
to introduce the student to the history, literature, and religion of the ancient 
Hebrews. 

112. Introduction to the New Testament. (4) A survey of the literature of the New 
Testament in the context of early Christian history. 

113. The Hebrew Prophets. (4) A study of the background, personal characteristics, 
function, message, contribution, and present significance of the Hebrew prophets. 

114. The Wisdom Literature. (4) An introduction to the Wisdom Literature of the 
Old Testament, with special attention to Proverbs. 

120. Introduction to the Bible. (4) A consideration of prominent themes found in the 



140 



Old and New Testaments. May be taken only by students who do not take Religion 
111 or 112. 

131. Basic Christian Ethics. (4) The Biblical and theological foundation of the 
Christian ethic and its expression in selected contemporary problems. 

161. World Religions. (4) The place of religion in life and the origin, nature, and| 
accomplishments of the liying religions of the world, studied from the historical point! 
of view. 

164. History of Christianity. (4) A rapid survey of the history of the Christian, 
Church. 

166. American Religious Life. (4) A study of the history, organization, worship, and 
beliefs of American religious bodies, with particular attention to cultural factors. 

171, 172. Meaning and Value in Western Thought. (4, 4) A critical survey of religion 
and philosophy in the Western world from antiquity to modern times. Either Reli- 
gion 171 or 172 satisfies the philiosophy or religion requirement; both 171 and 172! 
satisfy both the philosophy and religion requirements; choice determined at registra- 
tion. 

173. An Introduction to Christian Theology. (4) A study of the ground, structure,! 
and content of Christian belief. 

176. Theology and Modern Literature. (4) A study of modern literary artists whose 
themes are primarily theological, from Hopkins to Tolkien. 

200. Myth. (4) A study of the approaches to the interpretation of myth, with a focus 
on the meaning and yalues implicit in the myths of contemporary culture. 

201. Meaning of Religion. (4) A phenomenological study of different ways of 1 
defining religion, including yiews of representative philosophers, psychologists 
sociologists, anthropologists, theologians, and historians of religion. 

202. Religious Ecstasy. (4) A phenomenological study of religious ecstasy and of the 
methods by which it is obtained. Views of selected psychologists, sociologists, anthro- 
pologists, and historians of religion considered. 

214. Introduction to Biblical Archeology. (4) A survey of the contributions of Near 
Eastern archeology to Biblical studies. 

215. Visions of the End: Jewish and Christian Apocalyptic. (4) Reading and study 
of Biblical and non-Biblical apocalyptic texts. 

217. The Old Testament Apocrypha. (4) Reading of the books of the Apocrypha, 
with special attention to their origin and significance, and with a consideration of the 
ambivalence of Judaism and Christianity toward this literature. 

218. Seminar in the Mediterranean World. (4) Travel and study in such countries as 
Greece, Italy, Turkey. Egypt. Lebanon, Syria, and Israel. 

224. Jesus and the Synoptic Gospels. (4) A study of Jesus' proclamation and activity 
in the light of modern critical research on the Gospels. 

236. Church and Community. (4) An examination of the basic needs and trends of 






141 



the contemporary community, especially the rural and suburban, in the light of the 
Christian norms for "the good community." 

! 237. Black Religion and Black Churches in America. (4) Survey of literature on 
these themes with an examination of the historical background and special attention 
; to the contemporary area. 

238. Religion and Science. (4) An analysis of the relationship between science and 
religion in world culture. 

(240. Principles of Religious Education. (4) A study of the theory and practice of 
religious education, with emphasis on the basic foundations in religion and educa- 
tion. 

261. Judaism in the First Three Centuries of the Common Era. (4) A study of the 
development of Rabbinic Judaism out of the sects and movements of first century 
Judaism. 

'266. Religious Sects and Cults. (4) An examination of certain religious sects in 
America, including such groups as Jehovah's Witnesses, communal groups, and 
Black Muslims. 

270. Walker Percy. (4) A theological examination of his novels and essays, his 
Southern stoic background, and his use of European existentialism. 

273. Studies in Ecumenical Theology. (4) A study of various images and models of 
the church, their interrelationships and implication for ecumenism. 

276. The Problem of Evil from Job to Shakespeare. (4) A comparative analysis of 
jthe source and remedy of evil in Job, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Plato, Dante, and 
iShakespeare. 

277. Christian Literary Classics. (4) A study of Christian texts which are master- 
pieces of literature as well as faith, including works by Augustine, Dante, Pascal, 
! Bunyan, Milton, and Newman. 

282. Honors in Religion. (4) A conference course including directed reading and the 
writing of a research report. 

286, 287. Directed Reading. (1-4, 1—4) A project in an area of study not otherwise 
available in the department, permitted upon departmental approval of a petition 
presented by a qualified student. 

292. Teaching Religion. (4) A study of the teaching of religion in church, school, and 
community. 

312. Poetic Literature of the Old Testament. (4) A study of Hebrew poetry, its types, 
its literary and rhetorical characteristics, and its significance in the faith of ancient 
Israel. 

315, 316. Field Research in Biblical Archeology. (4, 4) A study of the religion and 
culture of the ancient Near East through the excavation and interpretation of an 
iancient site. 

317. The Ancient Near East. (4) A comparative study of ancient Near Eastern 



142 



cultures and religions, with special emphasis on Israel's relationships with surround- 
ing peoples. 

321. The Quest for the Historical Jesus. (4) An investigation of the possibility and ' 
relevance of historical knowledge about Jesus through a consideration of the seminal 
"Lives of Jesus" since the eighteenth century. 

322. The General Epistles. (4) An exegetical study of two or more of the general 
Epistles, with emphasis on the setting of the epistles in the life of the Early Church. 

326. Early Christian Theologians: Paul. (4) An introduction to the Pauline inter- 
pretation of Christianity and its place in the life of the Early Church. 

327. Early Christian Theologians: The Fourth Evangelist. (4) An examination of' 
the Johannine interpretation of Jesus and Christian faith. 

328. The New Testament and Ethics. (4) A study of selected ethical issues in the New 
Testament within the context of Mediterranean culture. 

332. Religion and the Social Crisis. (4) An interdisciplinary approach to the study of 
societv todav, with particular attention to views of human nature and social institu- 
tions as reflected in religion, the social sciences, and related disciplines. 

334. Christian Ethics and Contemporary Culture. (4) A studv of the encounter 
between the Christian ethic and the value systems implicit in social areas such ns t 
economics, politics, race, and sex. 

(a) Bio-medical Decisions 

(b) Feminist Theology 

346. Theological Foundations of Religious Education. (4) A studv of theological^ 
methodology, theories of learning, and philosophies of education in terms of their' 
implications for religious education. 

350. Psychology of Religion. (4) An examination of the psychological elements in! 
the origin, development, and expression of religious experience. 

354. Religious Development of the Individual. (4) A study of growth and develop- 
ment through childhood and adolescence to adulthood, with emphasis on the role of 
the home and the church in religious education. 

355. Theology of Pastoral Care and Counseling. (4) A studv of the relationship 
between theology and the purpose, theories, and methods of pastoral care. P — 
Permission of instructor. 

360. Hinduism. (4) A study of the fundamental features of the Hindu tradition. 

361. Buddhism. (4) A studv of the Buddhist tradition, its fundamental features, and 
its impact on the culture of Asia. 

363. Hellenistic Religions. (4) Consideration of available source materials, questions 
of method, and bibliography related to such Hellenistic religions as the mysteries, 
Hellenistic Judaism, and Gnosticism. 

364. Islam. (4) A study of the fundamental concepts of Islamic thought and the 
historical context of its development. Both the ancient and contemporary impact of 
the teachings of Islam considered. 



143 

365. History of Religions in America. (4) A study of American religions from 
colonial times until the present. 

368. The Church: Reformation and Counter- Reformation. (4) A study of the origin 
and development of Reformation theology and ecclesiology. 

373. History of Christian Thought. (4) A study of the history of Christian thought, 
beginning with its Hebraic and Greek backgrounds and tracing its rise and develop- 
ment to modern times. 

374. Contemporary Christian Thought. (4) An examination of the major issues and 
personalities in modern theology. 

376. The Origins of Existentialism. (4) A study of the principal nineteenth century 
figures who form the background for twentieth century existentialism: Goethe, 
Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Dostoevsky, and Tolstoy. 

Hebrew 

111, 112. Elementary Hebrew. (4, 4) A course for beginners in the classical Hebrew 
of the Bible, with emphasis on the principles of Hebrew grammar and the reading of 
Biblical texts. Both semesters must be completed. 

153. Intermediate Hebrew. (4) Intensive work in Hebrew grammar and syntax based 
upon the readings of selected texts. Readings emphasize post-Biblical Hebrew. 
P — Hebrew 111, 1 12, or the equivalent. 

211. Hebrew Literature. (4) The reading and discussion of significant Biblical 
Hebrew texts. P — Hebrew 153. 

212. Hebrew Literature II. (4) The reading and discussion of significant Biblical and 
post-Biblical texts. Offered on demand. P — Hebrew 153. 

301. Introduction to Semitic Linguistics. (4) A study of the history and stucture of 
four languages from the Hamito-Semitic family. 

Romance Languages 

Mary Frances Robinson, Chairman 

Professor of Humanities Germaine Bree 

Professors Shasta M. Bryant, John E. Parker Jr., 

Mary Frances Robinson, Richard L. Shoemaker, Anne S. Tillett 

Associate Professors Doranne Fenoaltea, Kathleen Glenn, Milorad R. Margitic, 

Gregorio C. Martin, Blanche C. Speer 

Visiting Assistant Professors Julian Bueno, Candelas M. Newton 

Lecturers Bianca Artom, Eva Marie Rodtwitt 

Instructors Catherine Anne Beaudry, Bonnie M. Carey, Candide Carrasco, 

Charles V. Ganelin, Ruben L. Gomez, David A. Petreman, 

Anna- Vera Sullam (Venice), Byron R. Wells 

The major in French requires a minimum of thirty-six credits, at least twenty-four 
of which must be in literature. French 219 and 22 1 or their equivalents are required; 



144 



History 321 and 322 are recommended. An average of at least C must be earned in all 
courses taken in the major. 

The minor in French language and culture requires twenty credits in French above 
French 153. It includes French 219, 221, 224, or their equivalents. The minor in 
French literature requires twenty credits in French literature above French 153. 

The major in Spanish requires a minimum of thirty-six credits, at least twenty of 
which are normally in the literature of Spain and Spanish America. Spanish 219 and 
221 or their equivalents are required; Spanish 223 and 224 and eight credits chosen 
from 225, 226, and 227 are recommended. Spanish 181, 1829, and 187 may not 
count toward the major. An average of at least C must be earned in all courses taken 
in the major. 

The minor in Spanish language and culture requires twenty credits in Spanish 
above Spanish 153. It includes 214 or 215 or 216, plus 219, 221, 223, and 224. The 
minor in Hispanic literature requires twenty credits in Spanish above Spanish 153. It 
includes 214 or 215 or 216, plus 225, 226, 227 and one additional advanced course in 
literature. For both Spanish minors, with departmental approval, equivalent courses 
may be selected from the programs in Salamanca or Bogota, and certain other 
substitutions may be made. 

A joint major is offered in French and Spanish, consisting of fiftv-six credits in the 
two languages and literatures, excluding elementary language. Required courses for 
this major are French 153x, 216, 217, 219, 221, and 224; Spanish 153x, either 215 or 
216, 2 19, 22 1 , either 223 or 224, and eight credits from 225 through 227. Equivalents 
maybe substituted. An average of at least C must be earned in all courses taken in the 
major. 

All majors are strongly urged to take advantage of the department's study abroad 
programs and to live for at least a semester at one of the foreign language residence 
centers at the Graylyn Estate. 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to applv for admission to the 
honors program in French or Spanish. To be graduated with the designation "Hon- 
ors in Romance Languages," a candidate must complete French or Spanish 280 and 
281 and pass a comprehensive written and oral examination. The oral examination 
may be conducted, at least in part, in the major language. For additional information 
members of the departmental faculty should be consulted. 

101. Self-Instructional Language. (4) A self-instructional language course covering 
the principles of grammar and pronunciation in one of the less commonly taught 
languages, such as Japanese, Swedish, Arabic, or Thai. Individual self-instruction in 
the language of the student's choice through the use of recorded material and 
textbooks. Admission bv petition to the Foreign Language Placement Review Com- 
mittee. Elective credit only; does not satisfy basic or divisional course requirements. 



French 

111, 112. Elementary French. (4, 4) A course for beginners, covering the principles, 
of French grammar and emphasizing speaking, writing, and the reading of 
elementary texts. Lab required. 






145 



113. Intensive Elementary French. (5) A one-semester course covering the elements 
of grammar and skills presented in French 111, 112. Intended for students whose 
preparation for French 153 is inadequate. Not open to students who have received 
credit for French 112. Lab required. 

153. Intermediate French. (5) A review of grammar and composition with practice in 
conversation. Reading of selected texts. Lab required. P — French 112, 113, or two 
years of high school French and placement. 

153x. Intermediate French. (4) Open to students by placement or permission. Lab 
required. 

164. A Classic in Comedy. (2—4) Participants plan and present a production of a 
French comedy. The play is rehearsed and performed in French; students are 
involved in all aspects of production. P — Permission of instructor. 

181. Swiss French Civilization. (4) The course is designed to acquaint the student 
with the Swiss people and their civilization through living for a few weeks with 
families. Visits are made to points of cultural interest, historical, literary, and artistic. 
A journal and a paper describing in detail some aspect of Swiss French civilization, 
both in French, are required. Usually offered in the summer. 

185. Paris, Cultural Center of France. (4) A study of Paris monuments on location to 
explore the development of the city as capital and cultural center of France. No 
prerequisites. Usually offered in the summer. 

199. French Individual Study. (2-4) P — Permission of the department. 

213. Masterpieces of French Literature I. (4) Reading of selected texts in French. 
Particular periods, genres, and authors may vary from section to section. Parallel 
reading and reports. Only one course in masterpieces may count toward the major or 
minor, but either may satisfy the basic or divisional requirement. P — French 153 or 
equivalent. 

214. Masterpieces of French Literature II. (4) Reading of selected texts in French. 
Particular periods, genres, and authors may vary from section to section. Parallel 
reading and reports. Only one course in masterpieces may count toward the major or 
minor, but either may satisfy the basic or divisional requirement. P — French 153 or 
equivalent. 

216. Survey of French Literature from the Middle Ages through the Eighteenth 
Century. (4) Study of selected texts, parallel reading, and study of trends and 
movements. P — French 153 or permission of instructor. 

217. Survey of French Literature of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries. (4) 

Study of selected texts, parallel reading, and study of trends and movements. 
P — French 153 or permission of instructor. 

219. Composition and Review of Grammar. (4) A systematic review of the fun- 
damental principles of comparative grammar, with practical training in writing 
idiomatic French. Required for major. P — French 153 or equivalent. 

221. Conversation and Composition. (4) Practice in speaking and writing French, 



146 



stressing correctness of sentence structure, phonetics, pronunciation, fluency, and 
vocabulary for everyday situations. Required for major. Lab required. P — French 
153 or equivalent. 

224. French Civilization. (4) An introduction to French culture and its historical 
development. Emphasis on intellectual, artistic, political, social, and economic life of 
France. Taught in French. P — French 221 or permission of instructor. 

227. History of French Civilization. (2) An introduction to the historical develop- 
ment of French culture, including consideration of its intellectual, artistic, and 
political heritage. Taught in French. P — French 221 or permission of instructor. ! 

228. Contemporary France. (2) A study of present-day France, including aspects oii 
geography and consideration of social, political, and educational factors in French 
life today. Taught in French. P — French 221 or permission of instructor. 

229. Business French. (4) A study of French used in business procedures, empha-i 
sizing specialized vocabulary pertaining to business correspondence, corporate orga-. 
nization, banking, and governmental relations, with practice in translation and 
interpretations, oral and written. P — French 2 1 9 and 22 1 or permission of instructor! 

231. Medieval French Literature. (2—4) A survey of French literature of the Middle 

Ages with cultural and political backgrounds. Selected masterpieces in original forrr! 

and modern transcription. P — French 216 or 217 or permission of instructor. 

i 
233. Sixteenth Century French Literature. (4) The literature and thought of the 

Renaissance in France, with particular emphasis on the works of Rabelais! 

Montaigne, and the major poets of the age. P — French 216 or 217 or permission oj 

instructor. 

241. Seventeenth Century French Literature. (4) A study of the outstanding writer; 1 
of the Classical Age. P — French 216 or 217 or permission of instructor. 

242. Seminar in Seventeenth Century French Literature. (4) A study of selected: 
topics of the period. Topics may vary from year to year. P — French 216 or 217 or 
permission of instructor. 

251. Eighteenth Century French Literature. (2-4) A survey of French literature oi: 
the eighteenth century with cultural and political backgrounds. P — French 216 oi 
217 or permission of instructor. 

252. Seminar in Eighteenth Century French Literature. (2-4) Study of selected 
topics ot the period. Topics vary from year to year. P — French 216 or 217 oil 
permission of instructor. 

261. Nineteenth Century French Literature. (4) A study of French literature of the 
nineteenth century with cultural and political backgrounds. P — French 216or217oi[; 
permission of instructor. 

262. Seminar in Nineteenth Century French Literature. (4) Study of selected topic; 
of the period. Topics vary from year to year. P — French 216 or 217 or permission ol 
instructor. 

263. Trends in French Poetry. (4) A study of the development of the poetic genre 



147 



with analysis and interpretation of works from each period. P — French 2 1 6 or 2 1 7 or 
permission of instructor. 

264. French Novel. (4) A broad survey of French prose fiction, with critical study of 
several masterpieces in the field. P — French 216 or 217 or permission of instructor. 

265. French Drama. (4) A study of the chief trends in French dramatic art, with 
reading and discussion of representative plays. P — French 216 or 217 or permission 
of instructor. 

271. Twentieth Century French Literature. (4) A study of general trends and 
representative works of the foremost prose writers, dramatists, and poets. P — French 
216 or 217 or permission of instructor. 

272. Seminar in Twentieth Century French Literature. (4) Study of selected topics of 
the period. Topics vary from year to year. P — French 216 or 217 or permission of 
instructor. 

280. Directed Research. (2) Required for honors in French. 

281. Directed Study. (3, 4) Extensive reading and/or research to meet individual 
needs. Required for departmental honors. P — Permission of the department. 

371. Surrealism. (4) Origins, theories, evolution, and impact. This course examines 
the interconnections between Surrealist poetry and painting and the works of Bre- 
ton, Eluard, and Aragon. Conducted in French. P — French 221 or equivalent. 

372. Proust. (4) Study of substantial portions of Proust's A la Recherche du temps perdu, 
its themes, and their significance in historical and aesthetic context. Conducted in 
French. P — French 221 or equivalent. 

373. French Images of America. (4) A study of French points of view through the 
reading of texts beginning with Tocqueville and ending with Michel Butor's Mobile. 
The course attempts to relate them to a variety of circumstances and influences, 
political, sociological, and cultural. Conducted in French. P — French 221 or equiva- 
lent. 

Semester in France 

The department sponsors a semester in France in Dijon, the site of a well estab- 
lished French university. Students go as group in the fall semester, accompanied by a 
departmental faculty member. 

No particular major is required for eligibility. However, a student ( 1 ) should be of 
unior standing and (2) should have taken as prerequisite French 22 1 or its equivalent 
pr at least one French course beyond the intermediate level. 

Students are placed in language courses according to their level of ability in 
French, as ascertained by a test given at Dijon. Courses are taught by native French 
brofessors. The resident director supervises academic, residential, and extracurricu- 
ar affairs and has general oversight of independent study projects. 

2232. Advanced Oral and Written French. (2-4) Study of grammar, composition, 
Pronunciation, and phonetics, with extensive practice in oral and written French. 



148 



2282. Contemporary France. (4) A studv of present-day France, including aspects of 
geographv and consideration of social, political, and educational factors in French 
life today. 

2292. French Civilization. (2-4) An introduction to French culture and its historical 
development. Field trips to museums and to points of historical and cultural signifi- 
cance in Paris and in the French provinces. 

2402. Independent Study. (2-4) One of several fields; scholar'sjournal and research 
paper. Supervision by the director of the semester in France and evaluation bv the 
department for which credit is granted. Work mav be supplemented bv lectures on 
the subject given at the Universite de Dijon Faculte des Lettres et Sciences Humaines. 

2752. French Literature. (2) Topics in the novel, theatre, and poetrv of France, 
largelv of the period since 1850. 

2762. Literary Pilgrimage. (2-4) Reading of selected French texts, with visits to sites 
having literarv associations. A studv of the relationship between milieux and works. 
Taught in French-speaking countries. 

Art 2712. Studies in French Art. (2) Lectures and field trips in French painting, 
sculpture, and architecture, concentrating on the eighteenth and nineteenth cen- 1 
turies. 

History 2262. The Golden Age of Burgundy. (2) Burgundian societv. culture, and 
government in the reigns of Philip the Bold. John the Fearless. Philip the Good, and 
Charles the Rash, 1384-1477. 

Spanish 

111, 112. Elementary Spanish. (4. 4) A course for beginners covering grammar 
essentials and emphasizing speaking, writing, and the reading of elementary texts. 
Lab required. 

113. Intensive Elementary Spanish. (5) A one-semester course covering the ele- 
ments of grammar and skills presented in Spanish 111. 112. Intended for students' 
whose preparation for Spanish 153 is inadequate or who have demonstrated pro- 1 
ficiencv in another language. Not open to students who have received credit for 
Spanish 112. Lab required. 

153. Intermediate Spanish. (5) A review of grammar and composition with practice 
in conversation. Reading of selected texts. P — Spanish 1 12 or 1 13 or two vearsof high 
school Spanish or equivalent. Lab required. 

153x. Intermediate Spanish. (4) Open bv placement or permission. Lab required. 

162. A Panorama of Drama. (2-4) A brief sampling of Spanish drama from its early 
period to the contemporary theatre, studying in Spanish representative works from 
each major period. Approximately six plavs. The class selects one plav to present in 
Spanish, with students having directing and acting responsibilities. 

181. Colombia: Study Tour of Bucaramanga, Cali, and Medellin. (4) Travel in 
Colombia and residence in one of its major cities in homes of private families for a 



149 

period of three weeks. Students receive instruction in spoken Spanish and in 
j Colombian literature and anthropology and political, social, or economic history. 
Does not count toward the major. Usually offered in the summer. 

187. Culture and Language. (4) A study of Spanish culture and language, tailored to 
various levels of student ability. Taught only in the Spanish-speaking world. Does not 
count toward the major. Usually offered in the summer. 

199. Individual Study. (2-4) P — Permission of the department. 

214. Introduction to Hispanic Literature. (4) Selected readings in Spanish and 
Spanish American literature. Designed as a substitute for either Spanish 215 or 216. 
Offered in the summer. P — Spanish 153 or equivalent. 

'■ 215. Major Spanish Writers. (4) Reading of selected texts. P — Spanish 153 or 
equivalent. 

216. Major Spanish American Writers. (4) Reading of selected texts. P— Spanish 153 
or equivalent. 

219. Advanced Grammar and Composition. (4) A systematic review of the fun- 
damental principles of comparative grammar, with practical training in writing 
idiomatic Spanish. Lab required. P — Spanish 153 or equivalent. 

221. Conversation and Composition. (4) Practice in speaking and writing Spanish, 
stressing correctness of sentence structure, phonetics, pronunciation, fluency, and 
! vocabulary of everyday situations. Lab required. P — Spanish 153 or equivalent. 

223. Latin American Civilization. (4) The culture and its historical development; 
emphasis on intellectual, artistic, political, social, and economic life. P — Spanish 153 
or 216. 

224. Spanish Civilization. (4) The culture and its historical development; emphasis 
on intellectual, artistic, political, social, and economic life. P — Spanish 215 or 216. 

225. Survey of Spanish Literature from the Middle Ages through the Seventeenth 
Century. (4) Extensive reading and studv of trends and influences. P — Spanish 215 
or 216. 

226. Survey of Spanish Literature from the Eighteenth Century to the Present. (4) 

Extensive reading and study of trends and movements. P — Spanish 215 or 216. 

227. Survey of Spanish American Literature. (4) Extensive reading and study of 
works from the colonial through the contemporary periods, with emphasis on the 

: late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. P — Spanish 215 or 216. 

229. Commercial, Official, and Social Correspondence. (4) Instruction in the spe- 
cial vocabularies, formats, and styles required in written and telegraphic communica- 
tions. Students write in Spanish communications appropriate to each type of corre- 
spondence. P — Spanish 215 or permission of instructor. 

234. Spanish Prose Fiction before Cervantes. (4) A study of the several types of 
; prose fiction, such as the sentimental, chivalric, pastoral, Moorish, and picaresque 
I novels, prior to 1605. P— Spanish 215 or 216. 



150 



241. Golden Age Drama. (4) A study of the major dramatic works of Lope de Vega,; 
Calderon de la Barca, Tirsode Molina, Ruiz de Alarcon, and others. P — Spanish 215 
or 216. 

243. Cervantes. (4) Intensive study of the life and works of Cervantes, with special 
emphasis on the Quixote and the novelas ejemplares. P — Spanish 215 or 216. 

244. Seminar in Cervantes. (2^4) A study of special aspects of Cervantes' works, suchi 
as the novelas ejemplares and his dramatic works. P — Spanish 215 or 216. 

252. Seminar in Hispanic Poetry. (2—4) A study of selected topics, such as gongoris-' 
mo, the romancero, and the Generation of 1927. P — Spanish 215 or 216. 

261. Nineteenth Century Spanish Novel. (4) A study of the novels of Valera, Pereda 
Galdos, Pardo Bazan, Blasco Ibanez, and their contemporaries. P — Spanish 215 oi 
216. 

265. Spanish American Novel. (4) A study of the novel in Spanish America from it? 
beginning through the contemporary period. P — Spanish 215 or 216. 

266. Seminar in Spanish American Novel. (4) A studv of one or more categories of 
Spanish American novels, such as romantic, indianista, realistic, gauchesca, and socia 1 
protest. P — Spanish 215 or 216. 

269. Nineteenth Century Spanish Drama. (4) A study of the principal dramatic! 
works from neoclassicism to the end of the century. P — Spanish 215 or 216. 

271. Modern Spanish Drama. (4) A study of the principal dramatic works from the | 
end of the nineteenth centurv through thecontemporarv period. P — Spanish 215 oil 
216. 

273. Modern Spanish Novel. (4) A studv of representative Spanish novels from tht 
Generation of 1898 through the contemporary period. P — Spanish 215 or 216. j 

274. Seminar in Modern Spanish Literature. (2—4) An analysis of selected work: 
representative of such movements as costumbrismo, realism, naturalism, and th< 
contemporary social novel. P — Spanish 215 or 216. 

275. Special Topics. (2—4) Selected special topics in Spanish or Spanish Americai I 
literature, such as the Spanish Romancero or the contemporarv Spanish Americai I 
novel. Offered at irregular intervals. 

280. Directed Research. (2) Required for honors in Spanish. 

281. Directed Study. (3-4) Extensive reading and'or research, to meet individua 
needs. Required for departmental honors. P — Permission of the department. 

Semester in Spain 

The department offers a semester in Spain at Salamanca, the site of a well 
established Spanish university. Students go as a group in the spring semester! 
accompanied by a professor from the College. 

No particular major is required for eligibility. However, a student ( 1 ) should be o 
junior standing, (2) should have completed intermediate Spanish or its equivalenl 






151 



and (3) should be approved by both the major department and the Department of 
Romance Languages. A course in Spanish conversation is also recommended. 

1829. Introduction to Spain. (2-4) Familiarization with the Spanish people, Spanish 
culture, and daily life in Spain. Classes in conversational and idiomatic Spanish, 
excursions to points of historical and artistic interest, and lectures on selected topics. 

2049. Spanish Phonetics and Phonology. (4) Theory and practical application of the 
elements involved in speaking correct Spanish. 

2059. History of the Spanish Language. (4) Evolution and historical development of 
the Spanish language, including regional dialects and present-day variations in the 
spoken and written form. 

2179. Intensive Spanish. (2) Intensive study and practice of the oral and written 
language. 

2259. Survey of Spanish Literature from the Middle Ages through the Seventeenth 
Century. (4) Extensive reading and study of trends and influences. 

2419. Spanish Literature of the Golden Age. (4) A survey of the most important 
authors and genres of the Golden Age, with particular emphasis on the novel and the 
drama. 

2759. Contemporary Spanish Literature. (4) A study of general trends and repre- 
sentative works of selected prose writers, dramatists, and poets from the modern 
period. 
| 

sociology 2029. Social-Political Structures of Present- Day Spain. (4) A study of the 
various social and political elements which affect the modern Spanish state. 

History 2019. General History of Spain. (4) History of Spain from the pre-Roman 
Deriod to the present day. 

nt 2029. Spanish Art and Architecture. (4) A study of the development and 
uniqueness of Spanish art and architecture within the framework of Mediterranean 
md Western art in general. 

Chinese 

HI, 112. Elementary Chinese. (4, 4) Emphasis on the development of listening and 
peaking skills in Mandarin. Brief introduction to the writing system. Basic sentence 
Jatterns covered. Lab required. 

199. Individual Study. (2-4) P — Permission of the department. 

Hindi 

111, 112. Elementary Hindi. (4, 4) Attention given mainly to basic Hindi grammar, 
'ocabulary building, simple composition, and conversation. Lab required. 

53. Intermediate Hindi. (4) Advanced practice in Hindi composition and conversa- 
|ion and introduction to literary Hindi. Lab required. P— Hindi 111, 112, or the 
quivalent. 



152 

211. Hindi Literature. (4) Reading and translation of selected texts in prose and 
poetry and journalistic Hindi. Lab required. P — Hindi 153. 

Italian 

113. Elementary Italian. (5) Intensive course for beginners, emphasizing the struc- 
ture of the language and oral practice. Recommended for students in the Venice 
program and for language majors. Lab required. Lecture — five hours. Offered every 
semester. 

153. Intermediate Italian. (5) Continuation of 113, with emphasis on reading and 
speaking. Lab required. Lecture — five hours. P — Italian 113 or two years of high 
school Italian. 

153x. Intermediate Italian. (4) Open bv placement or permission. Lab required. 

199. Individual Study. (2—4) P — Permission of instructor. 

215. Introduction to Italian Literature I. (4) Reading of selected texts in Italian.. 
Satisfies basic requirement in foreign language. Offered in the spring. P — Italian 153 on 
equivalent. 

216. Introduction to Italian Literature II. (4) May alternate with 215. Satisfies basic! 
requirement in foreign language. P — Italian 153 or equivalent. 

Semester in Venice 

2213. Spoken Italian. (4) Course in oral Italian, offered onlv in Venice. Students are, 
placed in small groups according to their levels of fluencv. Elective credit. 

Norwegian 

190, 191. Norwegian. (4, 4) Independent study of the language and directed reading 
of texts in Norwegian. Primarily for students specializing in foreign languages. 

Russian 

111, 112. Elementary Russian. (4, 4) The essentials of Russian grammar, conversa-. 
tional drill, and reading of elementary texts. Lab required. P — Permission of in-| 
structor. 

153. Intermediate Russian. (5) Training in principles of translation with grammar 
review and conversation practice. Lab required. P — Russian 112 or equivalent. 

153x. Intermediate Russian. (4) Open bv placement or permission. Lab required.. 

215. Introduction to Russian Literature. (4) Reading of edited texts from the 
nineteenth century. P — Russian 153 or equivalent. 

216. Introduction to Russian Literature. (4) Reading of edited texts from th< 
twentieth century. P — Russian 153 or equivalent. 

217. Seminar in Nineteenth Century Russian Literature. (4 ) A stud v of the foremost 
writers, with reading of representative works. P — Russian 153 or equivalent. 



153 

218. Seminar in Contemporary Russian Literature. (4) Reading of representative 
works in Russian with discussion of political and cultural backgrounds. P— Russian 
153 or equivalent. 

Sociology 

Philip J. Perricone, Chairman 

Professor John R. Earle 

Associate Professors William H. Gulley, Philip J. Perricone 

Assistant Professors Catherine T. Harris, Willie Pearson Jr. 

Instructor H. Kenneth Bechtel 

A major in sociology requires thirty-six credits and must include Sociology 151, 
371, and 372. A minimum average of 2.0 in sociology courses is required at the time 
the major is declared. A minimum grade point average of 2.0 in all sociology courses 
is required for graduation. 

, A minor in sociology requires twenty credits and must include Sociology 151 and 
Sociology 371. A minimum grade point average of 2.0 in sociology courses is re- 
quired at the time the minor is declared. A minimum grade point average of 2.0 in 
sociology courses is required for certification as a minor. Students who intend to 
pursue a sociology minor are encouraged to notify the department early in their 
junior year, and they are invited to participate in all departmental functions. 

To be graduated with the designation "Honors in Sociology," highly qualified 
majors are invited to apply to the department for admission to the honors program. 
They must complete a senior research project, document their research, and satisfac- 
.orily defend their work in an oral examination. For additional information members 
)f the departmental faculty should be consulted. 

151. Principles of Sociology. (4) General introduction to the field; social organiza- 
tion and disorganization, socialization, culture, social change, and other aspects. 

152. Social Problems. (4) Survey of contemporary American social problems. P— 
Sociology 151. 

!05. Photography in the Social Sciences. (4) Explores the use of photography as a 
esearch technique for the social sciences; camera and darkroom instruction in- 
luded. P — Permission of instructor. 

!48. Marriage and the Family. (4) The social basis of the family, emphasizing the 
iroblems growing out of modern conditions and social change. 

M. Religion as a Social Institution. (4) A study of the various forms of religion, 
uch as denomination, cult, sect. The relationship between religious factors and 
ther social factors. Civil religion and religiosity in the U.S. P— Sociology 151. 
02. Bureaucracy and Society. (4) The sociological analysis of complex organizations 
ocusingon bureaucracy, power, authority, decision making and change. Attention 
'ill be given to business as well as government and other non-profit organizations. 
| — Sociology 151. 

05. Male and Female Roles in Society. (4) Changing male and female roles in the 



154 



context of societal institutions and sociological theories that explain such changes 
Consideration of feminism as a social movement and of consequences of changing 
roles for human interaction. P — Sociology 151. 

309. Sex and Human Relationships. (2) Study of the societal forces that impinge or 
human sexual behavior, emphasizing the effects of social change, the implications ol 
changing gender roles, crosscultural and subcultural variations, and the influence ol 
the mass media. P — Sociology 151 or permission of instructor. 

310. Death and Dying. (2) Study of some of the basic issues and problems of modern 
man in accepting and facing death. P — Sociology 151 or permission of instructor. 

311. Women in Professions. (4) Emphasis on the status of women in professional 
occupations (e.g., law. medicine, science, business, etc.) in socio-historical perspec- 
tive. P — Sociology 151. 

325. Self and Society: An Interactionist Perspective. (4) An analysis of the effects of 
social relationships upon self-development, self-presentation, and the learning ol 
social roles and norms, with special emphasis on language and symbolic interaction. 
P — Sociology 151. 

333. The Urban Community. (4) A survey of materials relating to the community as a 
unit of sociological investigation, with emphasis on the urban setting. Of particular 
value for social work or community planning. P — Sociology 151 or permission of 
instructor. 

334. Society and Higher Education. (4) An analysis of the social forces that shape 
educational policies in the U.S. Assessment of significant contemporary writings on 
the manifest and latent functions of education. P — Sociology 151. 

335. Medical Sociology. (4) Analysis of the social variables associated with health and 
illness and with the practice of medicine. P — Sociology 151. 

337. Aging in Modern Society. (4) Basic social problems and processes of aging. 
Social and psychological issues discussed. Course requirements will include field 
placement in a nursing home or similar institution, P — Sociology 151 and permission 
of instructor. 

339. Sociology of Violence. (4) A survey of the social factors associated with indi- 
vidual and collective violence. Discussion will focus on the contemporary and histor- 
ical conditions which have contributed to various patterns of violence in American 
society. P — Sociology 151. 

340. Sociology of Child Development. (4) Socialization through adolescence in the 
light of contemporary behavioral science, emphasizing the significance of social 
structure. P — Sociology 151. 

341. Criminology. (4) Chime, its nature, causes, consequences, methods of treat- 
ment, and prevention. P — Sociology 151. 

342. Juvenile Delinquency. (4) The nature and extent of juvenile delinquency: an 
examination of prevention, control, and treatment programs. P — Sociology 151 and 
permission of instructor. 



155 

343. Sociology of Law. (4) Consideration will be given to a variety of special issues: 
conditions under which laws develop and change, relationships between the legal 
and political system, the impact of social class and stratification upon the legal order. 
P — Sociology 151 or permission of instructor. 

344. The Sociology of Deviant Behavior. (4) A sociological analysis of the nature and 
causes of and societal reaction to deviant behavior patterns such as mental illness, 
suicide, drug and alcohol addiction, sexual deviation, and criminal behavior. P — 
Sociologv 151. 

345. The Police and Society. (4) A study of the position and role of the police in 
modern society. Examination of the nature of social control in human societies, the 
role of the police in social control, the police in France, England, and the United 
States. P — Sociology 151. 

346. Seminar on Social Utopias. (4) Survey of major Utopian literature; emphasis is 
placed upon both the social organization in Utopian proposals and their implicit 
critique of current society and social ideologies. P — Sociology 151. 

347. Society, Culture, and Sport. (4) An examination of the interrelationship of sport 
and other social institutions. Emphasis on the study of both the structure of sport and 
the functions of sport for society. P — Sociology 151. 

348. Sociology of the Family. (4) The family as a field of sociological study. Assess- 
ment of significant historical and contemporary writings. An analysis of the struc- 
ture, organization, and function of the family in America. P — Sociology 151. 

349. Sociology of Science. (4) Emphasis on the origins and growth of science in 
socio-historical perspective, reciprocal relations between science and society in the 
twentieth century, science as a social system. P— Sociology 151 or permission of 
instructor. 

350. Mass Communications and Public Opinion. (4) The study of the increasing 
importance of collective behavior, emphasizing the relationship between the media 
and a changing society. P — Sociology 151. 

358. Population and Society. (4) Techniques used in the studv of population data. 
Reciprocal relationship of social and demographic variables. P — Sociologv 151. 

359. Race and Ethnic Relations. (4) Racial and ethnic group prejudice and discrim- 
ination and their effect on social relationships. Emphasis on psychological and 

ociological theories of prejudice. P — Sociology 151. 

360. Social Stratification. (4) The study of structured social inequality with a particu- 
ar emphasis on economic class, social status, and political power. P— Sociology 151. 

361. Sociology of the Black Experience. (4) A survey and an analysis of contempo- 
•ary writings on the status of Black Americans in various American social institutions 
e.g., education, sport, entertainment, science, politics, etc.) P— Sociology 151. 



156 

365. Dependency Needs and Social Services. (4) Examination of various forms of 
dependencv, such as social, economic, emotional, and physical, and community social 
agencies designed to meet these needs. Use of relevant literature, field experience, 
and resource persons. 

371, 372. The Sociological Perspective. (4.4) A two-semester course dealing with the 
development and application of major theories and research methods in sociology. A 
continuing effort is made to enable the student to deal with current theoretically 
oriented research. P — Sociology 151 and permission of instructor. 

380. Social Statistics. (4) Basic statistics, emphasizing application in survey research. 
(A student who receives credit for this course may not also receive credit for Biology 
348, Business 201, Mathematics 157, or Anthropology 380. A sociology major may 
take Anthropology 380 in lieu of Sociology 380 to meet major requirements.) 

385, 386. Special Problems Seminar. (4) Intensive investigation of current scientific 
research within the discipline which concentrates on problems of contemporary 
interest. P — Permission of instructor. 

398, 399. Individual Study. (1—4, 1—4) Reading research, or internship courses 
designed to meet the needs and interests of selected students, to be carried out under 
the supervision of a departmental faculty member. 

Speech Communication and Theatre Arts 

Donald H. Wolfe, Chairman 

Professors Julian C. Burroughs Jr., Franklin R. Shirley, Harold C. Tedford 

Associate Professors Michael D. Hazen, Donald H. Wolfe 

Visiting Assistant Professor Jo Whitten May 

Instructors Caroline S. Fullerton, Mae Jean Go, Allan D. Louden 

Visiting Lecturer James H. Dodding 

Lecturers John Steele, Mary R. Wayne 

For convenience in advising majors, the department divides the study of speech 
communication and theatre arts into the following fields: (1) communication/public 
address, (2) radio/television/film, (3) theatre arts, and (4) speech pathology/correc- 
tion. It is possible for a student either to concentrate in one of the first three fields or 
to take courses across the breadth of the discipline. Specific courses of study for both 
majors and minors are worked out in consultation with departmental faculty mem- 
bers. 

A major in speech communication and theatre arts consists of a minimum of forty 
credits, at least eight of which must be at the 300 level. In order for a course to count 
toward a student's major, the student must earn a grade of C or higher in the course. 

A minor in the first three fields listed in the first paragraph above requires six 
courses for a minimum of twenty- four credits, at least eight of which must be at the 
300 level. 

Those students majoring in speech education and theatre arts education are 



expected to take specific courses which meet the requirements for teacher certifica- 
tion. Information concerning the courses may be obtained from departmental facul- 
ty members. 

Highly qualified majors are invited bv the department to apply for admission to the 
honors program in speech communication and theatre arts. To be graduated with 
the designation "Honors in Speech Communication and Theatre Arts," they must 
successfully complete 28 1 . For additional information members of the departmental 
faculty should be consulted. 




158 

280. Special Seminar. (2-4) The intensive study of selected topics in communication! 
Topics may be drawn from any theory or concept area of communication, such a 
persuasion, organizational communication, film, or theatre. 

281. Honors in Speech Communication and Theatre Arts. (4) A conference cours< 
involving intensive work in the area of special interest for selected seniors who wish t( 
graduate with departmental honors. 

282. Individual Study. (2-4) Special research and readings in a choice of interest u, 
be approved and supervised by a faculty adviser. 

283. 284. Debate, Radio/Television/Film, or Theatre Arts Practicum. (2, 2) Indi 
vidual projects in the student's choice of debate, radio/television/film, or theatre artsj 
includes organizational meetings, faculty supervision, and faculty evaluation. Ni 
student may register for more than two credits of practicum in any semester. N<j 
student is allowed to take more than a total of eight credit units in practicum, onl ( 
four credits of which may be counted toward a major in speech communication ant 
theatre arts. Pass/Fail onlv. 



Communication/Public Address 

151. Public Speaking I. (4) A study of the nature and fundamentals of speecl 
communication. Practice in the preparation and delivery of short speeches. 

152. Public Speaking II. (4) The preparation and presentation of short speeches t< 
inform, convince, actuate, and entertain. P — Speech Communication 151. 

153. Interpersonal Communication. (4) The course is divided into three parts 
communication theory, person-to-person communication, and small group inter 
action. 

155. Group Communication. (4) An introduction to the principles of discussion and 
deliberation in small groups, with practice in group problem-solving and discussior 
leadership. 

156. Oral Interpretation of Literature. (4) Fundamentals of reading aloud, witj 
emphasis on selection, analysis, and performance. 

161. Voice and Diction. (4) A study of the principles of voice and production, wis 
emphasis on phonetics as a basis for correct sound formation. 

251. Persuasion. (4) A studv of the variables and contexts of persuasion in content, 
porary society. 

252. Argumentation and Debate. (4) A studv of the principles of argumentation 
practical experience in researching and debating a public policy question. 

253. The Rhetoric of Western Thought. (4) A survev of the major theories in rhetori 
from Plato to Burke, with emphasis on rhetorical criticism. Students apply tb 
historical/critical method to the rhetoric of contemporary movements. 

261. Clinical Management of Speech and Language Disorders. (4) Methods used t( 
correct speech disorders of voice, rhythm, language, and articulation; observation o 



159 



lethods used with selected cases in clinical or public school settings. Offered in 
'ternate fall semesters. 

162. Audiology. (4) Clinical audiology, including anatomy, physiology, disorders of 
he hearing mechanism, and interpretations of basic measurements of auditory 
mction. Offered in alternate spring semesters. 

63. Speech and Language Disorders I. (4) Study of the disorders of language, 
rticulation, and rhythm, with special emphasis on functional disorders; focus is on 
le role the therapist plays in assisting the speech-handicapped child. Offered in 
Iternate fall semesters. 

64. Speech and Language Disorders II. (4) Consideration of etiology and symp- 
>ms of speech and language problems due to organic disorders of voice, articula- 
on, language, and hearing. Offered in alternate spring semesters. 

71. Communication Theory. (4) An introduction to theory-building in communica- 
on and to the major contemporary theorists in the field. P — Speech Communication 
51 or permission of instructor. 

180. Special Seminar. (2—4) (See previous description.) 

[81. Honors Course. (4) (See previous description.) 

!82. Individual Study. (2—4) (See previous description.) 

83, 284. Debate Practicum. (2, 2) (See previous description.) 

53. British Public Address. (4) A historical and critical survey of leading British 
peakers and their speeches from the sixteenth century to the present. 

54. American Public Address. (4) The history and criticism of American public 
ddress from colonial times to the present. 

:355. Directing the Forensic Program. (2, 4) A pragmatic study of the methods of 
lirecting high school and college forensics with work in the High School Debate 
Vorkshop. Offered in the summer. 

56. The Rhetoric of Race Relations. (4) A study of race relations in America as 
effected in the rhetoric of selected black and white speakers. Students apply the 
listorical/critical method in exploring the effects of discourse on attempts at inter- 
racial communication. 

57. The Rhetoric of the Women's Movement. (4) A studv of selected women 
ctivists and the impact of their speeches and arguments from the l.SOOs to the 
iresent. Emphasis on the "New Feminist Movement." 

71. Research in Communication. (4) An introduction to design and statistical 
irocedures for research in communication. 

'72. A Survey of Organizational Communication. (3, 4) An introduction to the role 
If communication in organizations, with emphasis on field applications. 

74. Mass Communication Theory. (3. 4) Theoretical approaches to the role of 
'ommunication in reaching mass audiences and its relationship to other levels of 
ommunication. Offered in alternate years. 



160 



375. Communication and Conflict. (4) A study of communication in conflict situ 
tions on the interpersonal and societal levels. Offered in alternate years. P — Speec 
Communication 153 or permission of instructor. 

376. Small Group Communication Theory. (4) Advanced study of the principles j 
small group interaction and discussion leadership. P — Speech Communication U 
or permission of instructor. 

378. Semantics and Language Behavior. (4) A study of the syntactic and semant 
aspects of communicative messages. 



Radio/Television/Film 

141. Radio-TV Speech. (2) An introduction to announcing and performingon radl 
and television. 

241. Introduction to Broadcasting. (4) A study of the historical, legal, economic, an 
social aspects of broadcasting. 

242. Radio Production. (2) A study of the basic elements of radio production. 

243. TV Production. (2) A study of the basic elements of television production. 

245. Introduction to Film. (4) Historical introduction to motion pictures through th' 
study of various kinds of films and their relationship to society. 

246. Film Production. (2) A study of the basic elements of motion picture produj 

lion. 

280. Special Seminar. (2-4) (See previous description.) 

281. Honors Course. (4) (See previous description.) 

282. Individual Study. (2—4) (See previous description.) 

283. 284. Radio/Television/Film Practicum. (2. 2) (See previous description.) 

342. Seminar in Radio/Television. (3 or 4) Extensive readings in and discussion d 
fundamental theory and current issues in radio and television. Offered in spring, 1 98$ 
P — Speech Communication 241. 

344. Advanced Radio Production. (2) Study of advanced radio forms: documentar 
and drama. P — Speech Communication 242. 

345. Advanced TV Production. (2) Individual production of complex forms c 
television such as documentary and drama. P — Speech Communication 243. 

346. Film Criticism. (3 or 4) A studv of film aesthetics through an analysis of th 
work of selected film makers and film critics. Offered in spring, 1983. P — Speec 
Communication 245. 

348. Advanced Film Production. (2) Individual production of complex films such a 
drama, animation, and documentary. P — Speech Communication 246. 



161 



Theatre Arts 

1.21. Introduction to the Theatre. (4) A survey of all areas of theatre art. Experience 
in laboratory and University Theatre productions. May be used to satisfy a require- 
ment in Division I. Lab — three hours. 

122. Technical Theatre I. (2) An introductory course in the technical aspects of 
theatrical production focusing upon the basic techniques of scenic construction, 
:costume construction, make-up, and sound. This course is of special interest to 
potential majors. Off ered fall semesters only. P — Theatre Arts 121. 

123. Technical Theatre II. (2) An introductory course in the technical aspects of 
theatrical production focusing upon the basic techniques of mechanical drawing, 
istage lighting, scene painting, and props. This course is of special interest to potential 
.majors. Offered spring semesters only. P — Theatre Arts 122. 

:124. Drafting for the Theatre. (2) The techniques and terminology used in making 
iworking and construction blueprints for theatrical use. P — Theatre Arts 122 and 
123. 

(125. Basic Theatrical Lighting. (2) A study of theory and practice of stage lighting. 
P— Theatre Arts 122 and 123. 

126. Stage Makeup. (2) A study of the theories, materials, and techniques of theatri- 
cal makeup. P — Theatre Arts 122 and 123. 

[127. Costume Construction. (2) An introduction to fundamental drafting, cutting, 
land construction techniques of period theatrical costumes. P — Theatre Arts 122 and 
[123. 

1221. Mime. (4) An introductory study of basic mime forms. The student will gain 
.skills and understanding of this theatrical form through practical exercises, readings, 
rehearsals, and performances. 

1223. Stagecraft. (4) A study of the basic elements of theatre technology. Practical 
experience gained in laboratory and University Theatre productions. Open to fresh- 
men and sophomores by permission of instructor. Lab — five hours. 

226. Theories of Acting. (4) A study of acting theories and fundamental acting 
techniques. Open to freshmen and sophomores by permission of instructor. Lab — 
two hours. 

227. Theatre Speech. (4) An intensive course in the analysis and correlation of the 
physiological, physical, and interpretive aspects of voice and diction on the stage. 

228. The Contemporary English Theatre. (2,3, or 4) An examination of the English 
theatre through reading, lectures, seminars, and attendance at numerous live theatre 
performances. The participants are expected to submit written reactions to the plays 
which are seen. Ample time to allow visits to museums, libraries, and historic places. 
Taught in London. P — Permission of instructor. 

280. Special Seminar. (4) (See previous description.) 

281. Honors Course. (4) (See previous description.) 



162 

282. Individual Study. (4) (See previous description.) 

283, 284. Theatre Arts Practicum. (2, 2) (See previous description.) 

3110. The English Theatre, 1660-1940. (4) A study of the major developments in the 
English theatre from the Restoration to World War II, including the plays, play-j 
wrights, actors, audiences, theatre architecture, theatre management, costumes, and, 
sets. Field trips include visits to theatres, museums, and performances. Offered ir\ 
London. 

317. Theatrical Lighting Design. (4) The intensive study of the tools and aesthetics 1 
of the designer's craft with practical experience in designing for proscenium, thrust, 1 
and arena staging. P — Theatre Arts 125. 

318. Theatrical Special Effects. (4) A survey of the various special scenographic andt 
lighting effects used in modern theatre. Special emphasis will be placed on effects' 
used in productions done during the term. P — Theatre Arts 223 and 125. 

319. Costume: History and Design. (4) A study of the evolution of costume through 
the ages and the design of historic costume for the stage. P — Theatre Arts 121. 

320. Theatrical Scene Design. (4) A study of the theories and styles of stage design 
and their application to the complete play. P — Theatre Arts 121 and 223 or permis- 
sion of instructor. 

321. Play Directing. (4) An introduction to the theory and practice of play directing. 
A grade is not granted for this course until the student has completed Theatre Arts 

322. Lab — two hours. P — Theatre Arts 121 and 226 or permission of instructor. 

322. Play Production Laboratory. (2) A laboratory in the organization, the tech- 
niques, and the problems encountered in a dramatic production. The production ol 
a play for public performance required. P — Theatre Arts 321. 

323. Period and Style in Acting. (4) A study of social customs, movement, dances 
and theatrical styles relating to the perfomance of drama in historical settings as wel) 
as in period plays. The course includes performances in class. P — Theatre Arts 226. 

324. Advanced Mime. (4) This course enlarges upon skills and techniques acquired 
in Theatre Arts 221 (Mime), with the addition of other mime forms. The course 
includes exercises, rehearsals, and performances. P — Theatre Arts 221. 

325. Advanced Acting. (4) A concentrated study of the actor's art through theory 
and practice. P — Theatre Arts 226 or permission of instructor. 

326. Performance Techniques. (4) A course in advanced acting techniques, focusing 
on acting styles appropriate to various modes of theatrical production. Specializec 
techniques such as dance, singing, stage combat, etc., may also be included. P- 
Theatre Arts 226. 

327. Theatre History I. (4) A survey of the development of the theatre from it; 
origins to 1870; includes lectures, readings, and reports. 

328. Theatre History II. (4) A survey of the development of the modern theatre from 
1870 to the present day; includes lectures, readings, and reports. 



163 



J29. Advanced Theatre Speech. (4) Specific study in the theory and personal 
development of vocal melody, rhythm, color, and harmony according to the form, 
style, and mood of a theatrical production. P — Theatre Arts 227 or permission of 
nstructor. 

3300. Modern British and Continental Drama. (4) An examination of the works of 
major British playwrights of the modern period (from approximately 1875 to the 
present) to include, among others, Shaw, Galsworthy, Osborne, Shaffer, Stoppard, 
and Bond. At the same time, participants will study plays by major continental writers 
Df the same periods, including Ibsen, Chekhov, Pirandello, Weiss, Handke, etc. 
Whenever possible, the class will attend performances of relevant plays. Taught in 
London. 

3310. A Survey of English Theatre History. (4) Beginning with the Elizabethan 
period and continuing through the Restoration, the eighteenth century, the 
nineteenth century and into the twentieth century, this course will focus on the major 
periods of English theatrical activities, relevant personalities, and representative 
dramas. Field trips, museums, and performances will be part of the study of this 
course. Taught in London. 



School of Business and Accountancy 

Thomas C. Taylor, Dean 

Professors Delmer P. Hylton, Jeanne Owen 
Associate Professors Leon P. Cook Jr., Arun P. Dewasthali, Stephen Ewing 

Thomas C. Taylor 

Assistant Professors A. Sayeste Daser, Ralph B. Tower 

Lecturer Glenn L. Clark Jr. 

Instructors John D. Royster, Olive S. Thomas 

Objectives 

The School of Business and Accountancy recognizes the strong liberal arts tradi- 
tion of Wake Forest University. In conjunction with that recognition, the curriculum 
for the study of business is designed to provide a general business education rather 
than one of specialization in a particular functional area. 

The School of Business and Accountancy provides an opportunity for the student 
to study accountancy and the principal disciplines of business so that an understand- 
ing of the significant concepts, methods, and issues of business activity, including the 
international dimension, may be achieved. Thus, through the curricula in business 
and accountancy, the School aims to prepare its graduates for careers in the business 
world. 

The business program seeks to equip the student with key tools and knowledge 
which should enable the graduate to perform effectively at the entry level and to 
advance to more responsible positions in business management. The accounting 
program is structured so that the graduate is prepared for positions in public 
accounting, industrial accounting, and accounting in non-profit organizations. A 



164 



primary objective of the accounting program is to enable the student to prepare foi 
the professional CPA Examination. 

Admission 

Admission to the School is bv formal application, and applicants will be screened by 
the Admissions Committee of the School of Business and Accountancy. Before being 
considered for admission to the School of Business and Accountancy, the applicant 
first must have been admitted to Wake Forest College. 

Minimum requirements for admission to the School of Business and Accountancy 
are completion of sixty-five credits, a grade point ratio of 2.0 on all courses attemp- 
ted, and satisfactory completion of t wo semesters of Principles of Accounting and two 
semesters of Principles of Economics. The student also should have completer* 
Mathematics 108 or 111. 

The number of students who can be accommodated is limited. Therefore, the 
School of Business and Accountancy reserves the right to grant or to deny admission 
or readmission to anv student who meets the minimum requirements. Readmission 
to the School of Business and Accountancy first requires readmission to Wake Forest 
College, requirements for which are discussed on page 39. 

Transfer of Credit from Other Schools 

It is expected that all work toward degrees offered bv the School of Business and 
Accountancy will be taken in this school. Any exceptions must be approved by the 
Dean of the School of Business and Accountancy. For students wishing to transfer 
credit from other schools, the following general guidelines apply: 

(a) Courses at another school passed with the minimum passing grade at that school 
may not be transferred. 

(b) Courses transferred in business and accountancy are subject to validating ex- 
aminations. 

(c) No work in courses numbered 150 and above will be accepted from two-year 
schools. 

(d) Courses taken elsewhere in subjects not offered in the School of Business and 
Accountancy may not be counted toward the credits required in the School of 
Business and Accountancy. 

For the B.S. in business, a minimum of forty-one credits must be earned in the 
School of Business and Accountancy at Wake Forest L'niversity; for the B.S. in 
accountancy, the minimum credits required in this school total fifty-four. 

Requirements for Continuation 

To continue the program, a student must be academically responsible and must; 
show satisfactory progress towards completing the requirements for the degree. 
Students are responsible for knowing their academic status and whether they are 
meeting the minimum academic requirements for continuation in the School of 
Business and Accountancy. The Dean of the School of Business and Accountancy willl 
notify the student if these requirements are violated and will decide if the student 
may continue. 



165 



Requirements for Graduation 

The School of Business and Accountancy confers the Bachelor of Science degree 
vith majors in accountancy and business. For the major in business, a student must 
omplete the following course work: 

Accounting 1 1 1 and 112; Business 201, 202, 203, 21 1, 221. 231, 251, 261, and 271; 
'Iconomics 151 and 152; Mathematics 108 or 111; Speech 151 or 153 or 155; and a 
ninimum of eight credits from Business 212,213,214, 222, 223, 224, 225, 232, 233, 
!34, or any courses in Accounting above 1 12. 

For the major in accountancy, the following course work must be completed: 
Accounting 1 1 1, 1 12, 151, 152, 252, 253, 261, 271, and 273; Business 201, 203, 21 1, 
!21, 231, 261, and 271; Economics 151 and 152; Mathematics 108 or 111; and 
Speech 151 or 153 or 155. 

In addition to the courses stipulated above, the student in business and accountan- 
cy must also meet the following requirements for graduation: 

(a) a minimum of 144 credits, including the basic and divisional requirements 
established by Wake Forest College; 

(b) a minimum grade point average of 2.0 on all work attempted at Wake Forest; 
and 

(c) an overall 2.0 quality point average on all business and accountancy courses, 
exclusive of courses repeated with a C grade or better. 

Senior Honors Program 

Students with a grade point average of at least 3.0 on all college work and 3.3 on all 
vork in business and accountancy are invited to apply for admission to the honors 
jrogram in business and accountancy. A project, paper, or readings, and an oral 
:xamination are required. Those who successfully complete the requirements speci- 
fied by the School are graduated with the designation "Honors in Business" or 
'Honors in Accountancy." For additional information interested students should 
:onsult a member of the faculty of the School of Business and Accountancy. 

Courses of Instruction 
Business 

201. Business Statistics. (4) Techniques of analysis of numerical data, including 
descriptive statistics, sampling theory, statistical inference, correlation and regres- 
sion, and non-parametric statistics. 

202. Quantitative Analysis. (4) Development and understanding of quantitative 
decision tools and models to be applied to the managerial decision process. Models 
include linear programming (graphic, algebraic, and simplex solutions; sensitivity 
analysis; dualitv; transportation and assignment algorithm); decision theory; PERT/ 
CPM; and queuing. P — Business 201. 

203. Production Management. (4) A study of the problems of systems design and 
resource allocation within the Firm. Topics include process and job designs; facilities 



166 



location and layout; forecasting; aggregate planning; materials requirements plan 
ning; scheduling; quality control; and inventory model. P — Business 21 1 and eithe 
Business 202 or Accounting 252. 

211. Organizational Theory and Behavior. (4) The study of macro and mien 
organizational design — structure, processes, development, climate, behavior, ant 
performance evaluations. P — Junior standing. 

212. Advanced Management of Organizational Behavior. (4) Advanced manage, 
merit of problems of behavior and communication — organizational and interperson 
al. A comparative multinational perspective and experiential approach, developinj 
problem-solving processes for management of human resources. P — Business 211 

213. History of Management Thought. (4) A study of past and present contribution 

to the art of management — forces and institutions which control and influence th' 

exercise of managerial activities through time. Ethical and philosophical issues an 

included. P — Business 211. 

i 

214. Labor Policy. (4) A study of selected topics in labor-management relations it 

both the business and the public sector from the view of labor, management, and th, 
public. P — Business 211. 

221. Principles of Marketing. (4) A study of the role of marketing in business and thi 
economy. Emphasis is on the examination of marketing concepts, functions, institu, 
tions, methods, and consumer problems. P — Economics 151 and 152. 

222. Marketing Strategy. (4) Managerial techniques in planning and executin; 
marketing programs in business and nonbusiness organizations. Emphasis is on th' 
group experience in decision making related to market segmentation, produc 
innovation and positioning, channels of distribution, pricing, and promotion. Exten' 
sive use of cases, readings, and team presentations. P — Business 201 and 221. 

223. International Marketing. (4) Problems in marketing overseas, analysis of cultun 
al, economic, and political environment of foreign marketing operations, organiza 
tion and control of the multinational company. P — Business 221 and senior standing 

224. Marketing Research. (4) Introduction to fundamentals of research methodolo 
gy and use of research information in marketing decision making. Topics includ] 
research design, data collection methods, scaling, sampling, and alternate method 
of statistical data analysis. Students design and execute their own research projects 
P— Business 201 and 221. 

225. Buyer Behavior. (4) Study of basic behavioral science applications in buve! 
motivation and behavior and in buying decisions. Emphasis on current research ant 
theory relating to consumer behavior. P — Business 221. 

231. Principles of Finance. (4) An introduction to the field of finance includinj 
financial management, investment analysis, and financial institutions and markets 
Emphasis is placed on financial management at the level of the business entity o 
non-profit organization. P — Accounting 112 and Economics 151 and 152. 

232. Advanced Financial Management. (4) Management decision-making applied tt 



167 



ttie financial function, including investment, financing, dividend, and working capi- 
tal decisions and their impact on the value of the firm. P — Business 201 and 231. 

!33. Investment Analysis. (4) Study of investment alternatives, expected returns, 
|nd corresponding risks; valuation of stocks and bonds applying both fundamental 
ind technical analvsis; survey of past and current methods of stock selection tech- 
niques, including portfolio considerations. P — Business 201 and 231. 

•34. Business Risk Management. (4) Analysis of the financial problems inherent in 
business risk-taking and an evaluation of insurance and alternate methods of dealing 
•vith such problems. P — Business 201 and 231. 

!51. Management Information Systems. (4) Study of the development, design, and 
mplementation of management information systems with introduction to the termi- 
lology, concepts, and trends in computer hardware and software. P — Business 211. 

,261. Legal Environment of Business. (4) A study of the legal environment in which 
business decisions are made in profit and nonprofit organizations. Emphasis is put 
Upon how the law develops and how economic, political, social, and ethical considera- 
tions influence this development. 

271. Business Policy. (2) Application of the case method to problems of business 
bolicy formulation and strategic planning. P — Business 203, 211, 221, and 231. 

281. Reading and Research. (2, 3, or 4) An advanced course devoted to individual 
■eading and research in business. P — Permission of instructor. 

Accountancy 

111. Accounting Principles I. (4) The basic accounting process and underlying 
principles pertaining to the preparation and interpretation of published financial 
statements. 

;112. Accounting Principles II. (4) A continuation of Accounting 1 1 1 and an intro- 
duction to management accounting. P — Accounting 111. 

'151. Intermediate Accounting. (4) A detailed analysis of theory and related prob- 
lems for typical accounts in published financial statements. P — Accounting 1 12. 

152. Intermediate Accounting. (4) A continuation of Accounting 151. P — 
Accounting 151. 

201. Business Law. (4) A study of the Uniform Commercial Code. Open only to 
.senior majors. P — Business 261. 

252. Cost Accounting. (4) Advanced study of management accounting, including 
,budgeting, product-costing, cost allocation, standard costs, transfer-pricing, dif- 
ferential analvsis, and cost-behavior analvsis. P — Accounting 112. 

|253. Accounting Information Systems. (4) A study of functions performed by an 
"adequate accounting information system and methods and procedures necessary to 
.supplv useful data, oriented toward computerized data processing. P — Accounting 



168 



254. Accounting in the Not-for-Profit Sector. (4) An examination of accounting 
theory and practice in governmental and eleemosynary organizations. P- 
Accounting 151. 

261. Advanced Accounting Problems. (4) A study of the more complex problems 
found in business operations, business combinations, reorganizations, and dissolu- 
tion. P — Accounting 152. 

271. Income Tax Accounting. (4) Accounting for purposes of complying with the 
Internal Revenue Code. Preparation of personal and business tax returns. P — 
Accounting 152. 

273. Auditing. (4) Designed to familiarize the student with the CPA profession, with, 
particular emphasis on the attest- function. P — Accounting 152 and 252. 

275. CPA Review. (4) An intensive study of CPA-tvpe problems found on the 
accounting practice and accounting theory sections of the CPA exam. P — Accounting 
252 and 261. 

278. Reading and Research. (2, 3, or 4) Directed study in specialized areas of 
accountancy. P — Permission of instructor. 




Graylyn Estate, site of the residential language centers 



Degrees Conferred 



169 



May 18, 1981 

Bachelor of Arts 



Gloria Beth Abels, summa cum laude 
Dorothy Elizabeth Adcock, cum laude 
Vincent Steven Alig 
[ill Marie Allen, summa cum laude, 

with honors in music 
Beverly Lynn Alston 
Stephen Matthew Amidon, 

magna cum laude 
Brian A. Anderson 
Glen Scott Andrews 
Michael Dale Applegate 
Janice M. Atkins, cum laude, 

with honors in psychology 
Cynthia Lu Armentrout 
Stacev Lynne Armstrong, 

magna cum laude 
Sharon Lynne Arnette, cum laude 
Lloyd Mason Arnold 
Anna Priscilla Ashburn, cum laude, 

with honors in speech communication 

and theatre arts 
Millicent Austell 
Paul Thomas Bailey 
William Lenox Barker 
William Roosevelt Baker Jr. 
Carol Denise Barbee 
Anne Easlev Barnes 
Laurie Michelle Barnes 
Melissa Marlene Barnes 
Amelia Carlton Barnett 
Charles Daniel Barrett, cum laude 
Karen Valinda Barrett 
Edward Teer Barringer 
Edwin Franklin Barry, cum laude 
Jacqueline Ann Bates, cum laude 
Susan Crockett Batson, 

magna cum laude 
Anne Cameron Beard 
John Hemdon Beard 
John Arthur Beaslev III 



Walter Boyd Beeker Jr. 
Jacqueline Anne Benson 
Stephen Roland Berlin, 

magna cum laude 
Charles Nesbitt Berry 
Alison Rose Biggs 

Derrick Sherrod Blackmon, cum laude 
Donald Sheffield Bland 
Douglas William Blissit, cum laude 
Eric Walter Boelkins, cum laude 
Robert L. Boggs Jr.. cum laude 
Carol Ann Bolton 
Helen Elizabeth Boone, cum laude 
Alan G. Bourque 
Robert Daniel Boyce, cum laude 
Sara Lynn Bovles, cum laude 
Arden James Bradley III 
Cynthia M. Bradley, cum laude 
Janice Bradley, cum laude 
Douglas James Brady 
Christine Ann Bramel, cum laude 
Kenneth Robert Bramlett Jr., 

magna cum laude 
Jennifer Susan Brantley, cum laude 
Margaret Anne Braswell, cum laude 
Kimberly Ann Brewer 
David Lawrence Brodish, cum laude 
Denise Ann Brown, cum laude 
Paul Clark Brown Jr., magna cum laude 
Stephen Blavne Brown, cum laude, 

with honors in history 
Douglas Scott Brovles 
Anthony C. Brueneio 
Leslie Diane Buchanan, cum laude 
Anne Carole Bucher, cum laude 
Catherine Anne Burgess, cum laude 
Howell Arnold Burkhalter 
Wesley Thomas Burnett 
William Christopher Buss 
Tony Ray Cahill 



170 



Joyce Lvnn Camp, cum laude 
Erin Elizabeth Campbell 
Clenn Carsten Campbell. 

magna cum laude 
Lee Webb Campbell II 
Weldon Jackson Campbell Jr. 
John Lawton Capps, magna cum laude 
Gregory Stewart Carter 
Pamela Lynn Carter, cum laude 
Clyde Brower Case III 
Clyde Richard Cash 
Edwin Rhett Chamberlain, cum laude 
Lori Nicol Clark 
Robert Edward Clark 
Connie Ruth Clipp. magna cum laude 
Stephen Colaguori 
Curtis C. Coleman III, cum laude 
Randall Ray Combs 
Patricia Earle Connelly 
Michael Patrick Conrad. 

magna cum laude 
Carol Elizabeth Copeland, 

magna cum laude 
Elizabeth Ann Copeland 
Cynthia Lewis Corey 
Mark Anderson Crabtree, cum laude 
Deanna Lynn Craig, cum laude 
Robert Orr Crawford III. cum laude. 

with honors in hsitory 
Dwayne E. Crayton 
Sharon Ruth Cumbee, magna cum laude 
Bryan Keith Curran 
Susan Scott Darnell, magna cum laude. 

with honors in economics 
Lance Brian Dayid 
David Lewis Davis 
Johnny Lee Dawkins III 
Anna Catherine Deal, magna cum laude 
Sharon Elaine Dedmon 
Ruth Hanmer DeLapp 
Lisa De Maio 
Thomas Dixon Dickens 
Thomas Leslie Doolev 
John Wolcott Doss 
David Scott Dowie 
Ellis Branch Drew III, cum laude 



Dian Marie Dugan, cum laude 

Carohn Paulette Dukeshire 

John Robert Dunlap Jr. 

Robert Joseph Dunn III 

Roger Lee Durham 

Leah M. Durner 

James Zachariah Eakes III 

Ellen Downs Easter 

Laura Ellen Eaton, cum laude 

Carolyn Elizabeth Edmonds 

Donald Ausbon Edmondson. cum laude 

Walter Elias III. cum laude 

Quentin Bradford Ellis 

Cynthia Brantley Ennis, cum laude 

Kathleen Farlev 

Richard Mark Feathers, cum laude 

Lisa Humphrey Ferguson 

David Joseph Ferraro 

Jeffrey Alan Fink, cum laude 

Rhonda Gisele Fisher, cum laude 

Henrv Stalev Fonvielle. cum laude 

Margaret Elizabeth Ford, cum laude 

Pamela Ann Foresman, cum laude 

Martin Jon Fosso. cum laude, 

with honors in English 
John David Foulke Jr., cum laude 
Arlesa Ann Fouts, cum laude 
John Edward Rowan Friedenberg 
Anat Frvdman, cum laude 
Timothy Gerard Gannon Jr. 
John Charles Wavne Gardner Jr., 

cum laude 
Steven Howard Garfinkel 
Marilyn Sue Garner 
Thomas Eugene Garrett Jr. 
James Lawrence Gastner 
Barbara Ann Geiger, cum laude 
Arthur A. Gennari 
Shervl Ann Gillikin. magna cum laude 
Gregory Gee Glass 
Martin Bav Godwin 
David Goldring 
Todd Alan Goodling 
John Michael Goodman 
Ross Steingrimur Goodman 
James Carlyle Gordon III 



171 



harles Parker Grannis, 
I magna cum laude, 
i with honors in psychology 
David Spencer Green, cum laude 
Stanlee Parks Greene Jr. 
Sandra Jean Griffin, cum laude 
Trina Dare Griffin, cum laude 
|ames Richard Groome, 

magna cum laude 
Melson Smith Gwinn III, 

magna cum laude, 

with honors in biology 
Kenneth Bruce Gwynn, cum laude 
Heidi Ann Hagen, siunma cum laude 
Dwayne Allen Hall 
Terry W. Hammond Jr. 
James Gregory Hampton 
Cynthia Lynn Hanna, cum laude 
Samuel F. Hanna 
Diane Irene Hansen 
Lynnell Elizabeth Hardie, cum laude 
Norman Brian Harris 
Susan Rhea Harris 
Helen Adair Hatcher 
Karen R. Haynes, cum laude 
Joel Mark Heilman 
Henry Joseph Peter Heim, cum laude 
James Relerford Helvey III, 

magna cum laude, 

with honors in German 
Nancy Baucom Henderson, cum laude 
Kenneth Charles Herring, cum laude 
Louise Staley Hiatt 
James Stacy Hicks, cum laude 
Timothy Robert Hileman 
Brian Taylor Hill 
Bryan Keith Hill 

Esther Jean Hill, magna cum laude 
Gary James Hill 
Frank Hinman II 
John David Hipes, cum laude, 

with honors in history 
Benjamin Keith Hodge 
John George Holevas, magna cum laude 
William Amos Hough III 
Terry Layne Houser, cum laude 



Lonnie West Hughes III 

Timothy Olen Hull, cum laude 

John Traver Humphrey 

Robert Howard Humphries 

John Charles Hunter 

Dean Scott Hutcherson 

Alfred Sherwood Irving Jr. 

Jeffrey Neal Isaac, cum laude 

Ellen Ann Jackson 

Melanie Ruth Jarratt, cum laude 

William Leroy Jeffords Jr. 

Gail Schultz Jenkins 

Robert Ashley Jenkins 

James Jeffrey Jeter 

Sara Grace Johe 

Cynthia Alice Johnson 

Rebecca Darlene Johnson 

Deborah L. Jones 

Nena Randolph Jones, cum laude 

Randle Leon Jones 

Susan Drummond Jones, cum laude 

Ramona Suzette Jordan 

Walter Baker Jordan 

Mary Elizabeth Keeton 

Sarah Katherine Kelly, cum laude 

Karen Lynn Kepler, cum laude 

James Donald Kepley Jr. 

Hanna Elizabeth King, cum laude 

Karen Sue Klemons 

Jeffrey Neil Knight, cum laude 

Ruth Sydnor Knight 

John Joseph Korzen, cum laude 

Lincoln B. Krause, cum laude 

Kimberley Beck Kurtz, cum laude 

Michael Reid Laffon 

Michael Kirk Lands, cum laude 

Lee Anne Langley 

Nancy Ellen Lanier 

Jonathan Allen Laymon 

Regina Elizabeth Lazorik 

Marshall Thompson Lee 

Greg Alan Lefelar, cum laude 

David Arthur Leland 

Sandra Fay Leonard, cum laude 

Carol Lewis, summa cum laude 

George H. Limpert, cum laude 



172 



Kenneth Russell Lindquist 

Donald G. Lisenbee Jr. 

Kimberlv Dawn Love 

Stephen Winston Lucas 

Stacy Lee Luks, cum laude 

Laura Ann MacDermeid 

William Robertson Madill, cum laude 

Gary Cecil Mahathey 

Perrv Nicholas Mandanis 

Dennis Gerard Manning 

Kathleen Ann Heaphy Marlowe 

Andrea Lieta Marrotte 

David Brian Marshall, magna cum laude. 

with honors in English 
Thomas Ellis Marshall 
John Dearman Martin 
Kenneth Andrew Matich 
Ronald Lee Mattison 
Charles Wayne Maxim, cum laude 
Melinda Ann Maxwell 
John Timothy McCabe 
Maria Ann McDaniel 
Carole Jean McDonald 
Gilbert Rav McGregor 
James Charles McLaughlin Jr. 
Kathleen Jane McLaughlin 
John Rufus McNair Jr., 

summa cum laude 
Scott Eugene McNulty 
John Thomas Meadors 
Mark Lawrence Mever 
James Moxlev Michael Jr. 
David John Middleton III 
Janice Kay Middleton, cum laude 
Mary Lynne Millwood, magna cum laude 
Judith Lorraine Milsap, cunt laude 
George Evans Minot III 
Frankie Darel Moore 
Rodney Joe Moore 
Robert Wayne Morgan 
Linda H. Morton 
John Christopher Mullen. 

magna cum laude, 

with honors in English 
Marilyn Patrice Munson 
Willis Everette Murphrev IV 



Jane Ellen Murphy 

Laura Rae Murray 

John Howard Muse, cum laude 

Julia Annette Myers, summa cum laude 

Susan Grace Myers, magna cum laude 

Susan Lynn Nail 

Harry Russell Neighbors Jr., cum laude 

John Raymond Nelson III, 

magna cum laude 
Hillary Anne Nichols, cum laude 
Douglas Scott O'Brien 
Donna Marie Ollis, cum laude 
Sherry Joan Olson 
Katherine Gail Ostdahl 
Linda Susan Owen, cum laude 
Mark S. Owens 
Samuel Phillips Page 
Stephen Michael Pahides 
Richard Burton Park 
Pamela Jean Parker 
David Randolph Parsons 
Charles Fredrick Patton Jr. 
Lennis Louise Pearcv, summa cum laude 
Rodney Franklin Pell 
Karev Lea Perkins 
Jarvis Wesley Perry 
Kenneth Joseph Perry 
Kimberlv Jane Perrv, cum laude 
Joseph F. A. Petrone, cum laude 
Robert Finnie Phillips, cum laude, 

with honors in history 
Carlen Rae Pierce, cum laude 
William Thomas Pike Jr. 
Colin Mackenzie Pitcairn 
Briane Pittman, cum laude, 

with honors in psychology 
Patricia Mae Polk 
Kenneth McCarley Prichard 
Denise Elaine Privette 
Kirk Proctor 
Lisa Diane Quisenberry 
Angela Denise Rabb 
Earl Lee Rabv Jr. 
Thvra Lynne Rauch, cum laude 
E. Kemp Reece Jr. 
Jane Griswold Reed, magna cum laude 



173 



Alice Louise Reid, cum laude 
Michael George Riley, summa cum laude 
Stephanie Decker Roach, cum laude 
|ane Naylor Roberson 
David Prince Robertson, 

summa cum laude 
|ohn Scott Robinson 
[ames Orion Rogers, cum laude 
|ohn Clifton Rogers 
Susan Leigh Rogers, summa cum laude 
[ohn Andrew Rote 
Amy Delores Russell 
Martha Anne Russell, cum laude 
David Jackson Savage III 
Deborah Ann Schnerring, cum laude, 

with honors in psychology 
Bradley Nicholas Schulz 
Gary Wayne Scott, cum laude 
Cynthia Louise Sechler, 

magna cum laude, 

with honors in romance languages 
Margaret Lynn Shearin, cum laude 
Sharon Sheets 
[erry Christopher Sieg 
Carol Anne Singletary, cum laude 
Wilbert Reynard Singleton 
Lisa Helena Slade 
Brick Dudley Smith 
Cecile Carr Smith, cum laude 
David Coventry Smith, cum laude 
Gregory Stuart Smith, cum laude 
Marian Keith Smith 
Mary Eliza Smith 
Anne Elizabeth Spencer, 

magna cum laude, 

with honors in romance languages 
Amanda Lee Spitler 
Mark Alan Springfield 
Tracy Stines 
Ann Black Strader 
Jimmy Blake Strickland 
Gary Kent Sue 
James Russell Sugg Jr. 
Julia Winifred Summerlin, 

magna cum laude 
Michael Alan Tatum 



Katherine Leigh Taylor 

Michael Thomas Teixido, cum laude 

Lorrey F. Thabet, cum laude 

Corlis Rene Thomas 

Daniel Kent Thomas 

Sally Reid Tickle, cum laude 

Robin Kelly Timberlake, cum laude 

Karen Louise Trafford, cum laude 

Ashton Pleasants Trice 

Robert Andrew Troxler Jr. 

Janice Elaine Trull, summa cum laude 

Stephen Frank Turco, cum laude 

Donald Andrew Tynes 

Frederick Hans Uberseder 

Andrew Marsh Utter, cum laude, 

with honors in economics 
Jane Reid Van Brug 
Leslie Elizabeth VanLehn, cum laude 
Anja Astrid van Nood 
Patricia Anne Vecellio, summa cum laude 
Pamela Gwen Veeder, cum laude, 

with honors in psychology 
Robert Stephen Vick 
Richard Frederick von Dorn Jr. 
John Timothy Wagner, cum laude 
Terry Lynn Wagstaff 
Carrie Elizabeth Wall 
Amy Rebecca Walters, magna cum laude 
Michael Edward Walters 
David Marion Warren, cum laude 
Cynthia La Verne Washington 
Valerie Lynn Watson 
Richard Mariner Waugh, cum laude 
Randall Babbitt Weaver, cum laude 
Mary Kathryn Weeber, cum laude 
Melanie Rebecca Welch 
Steven Arthur Welty 
Joseph Warren Wescott II, cum laude 
Robert Craig Wheatley 
Lisa Ann Whisnant, cum laude 
Connie Lynne White 
David B. White 
Nellie Dorey White 
Charles Edward Wiles 
Kelly Gene Williams 
Nathan Ramon Williams, magna cum laude 



174 



Perry Ward Williams 

Drew Kimbal Willson 

Diane Hamlet Windle 

Craig Edwin Wolff, magna cum laude 

Annette Woolard, cum laude 



Mary Martha Wooten, cum laude 
David McKinney Wright 
Richard Springer Wurst Jr., cum laude 
Carol Ann Yandle, cum laude 
Deborah L. Zvosec, cum laude 



May 18, 1981 

Bachelor of Science 



Diane Francis Allen 

Franklin Rav Allen 

Rickey Jay Allred, cum laude 

Richard Blake Atkins 

Anne Saunders Barbour, cum laude 

Gregory Bailey Barrow 

Jeffrey Arthur Batts 

Robyn Adair Bowers, cum laude 

Robert Alan Brewster, magna cum laude 

Hughlene Annette Burton 

Robert Nicholas Butler Jr., cum laude 

Clifford Frank Campbell 

Michael Ronald Cantin 

John James Cater III, cum laude 

Scott Thomas Chapman, cum laude, 

with honors in mathematics 
Ingil Cho 

Cynthia Hope Clodfelter, cum laude 
Claire Ellen Colley, magna cum laude 
Sandy William Combs 
Barbara Lynne Conrad 
Samuel Power Cox 
Derek John Crocker 
Charles David Dahms 
Mark Elliot Damon 
Christine Susan Daniel, cum laude 
Jane Elizabeth Danieley 
Ann Jenkins Davis 
Amanda Gail Demouthe, cum laude 
Sarah Page Dickson 
Donna Lee Hardesty Douglass, 

cum laude 
Tammy Joan Dull 
Jon Christopher DuMond 



Richard Brian Dyer, magna cum laude 
Travis Edward Eldridge 
Andrew Claiborne Ellis 
Diane Gladys Evans, cum laude, 

with honors in physical education 
Charles Robert Faig 
John Robert Feaganes 
Grady Nelson Forrester Jr. 
John Joseph Fosina 
Douglas Ralph French 
Gregory Scott Frisby 
Christopher Lamar Gaynor 
John Howard Gebbie 
John Wesley Geissinger, cum laude 
Amy Louise Geithner 
Elizabeth Imm Graham, 

magna cum laude 
Sarah Kathrvn Graham 
Jack Marvin Gustafson Jr. 
Theresa Catherine Hall 
John David Hermansdorfer 
N. Daniel High 

Rhonda Darlene Hill, cum laude 
William Davis Hoey 
Julie Helene Hoffman, cum laude 
Thomas Edward Hoke 
Stephen John Horvath 
Christopher Steven Hurd, cum laude 
John Fahey Jameson 
Michael Stuart Jeske 
Franklin L. Johnson 
David Neal Jones, cum laude 
Craig Griffin Kmosko 
William Ronald Knight, cum laude 



Randal Clark Kushma 

Edwin Edgely Laws II 

Charles William Leonard Jr., cum laude 

Carol Ann Leuchtenberger, 

summa cum laude 
Lavonda Kay Luper 
Tammy Taylor Mabe 
Stephen E. Marano 
Mark Nixon McCall, cum laude 
Bruce John McCreedy Jr., cum laude 
[ames William McGill, cum laude 
Laurie Elizabeth McGuire, 

magna cum laude 
Martin James McHugh Jr. 
Brenda Vernese McKoy, cum laude 
Stephanie Menking 
Moland Mattocks Mewborn 
Darrell John Miller, cum laude 
[ean Marie Mitchell, cum laude 
Eugene William Munro 
Emily Grace Neese 
Daniel A. Noakes 

Eric Stuart Osborn, magna cum laude 
Clara Marguerite Page 
Lisa Anne Patterson 
ramara Lynn Pausch, cum laude 
Dren Bradley Payne 
Douglas David Peeler 
Sarah Ellen Peterson, magna cum laude 
Laurie Marsden Plyler, cum laude 
Susan Elizabeth Prugh, 

magna cum laude, with honors in English 
David Mark Riffe, summa cum laude, 

with honors in physics 
Cynthia Marie Rusnak 
Charles Bruce Russell, cum laude 
Lisa Kaye Schwinn 
Cina Marie Sears 
Cynthia Wilcox Seidel, cum laude 



David Aaron Senter, cam laude 

Melodie Lynne Simmons, cum laude 

Lockhart Simpson 

Ravborn Duke Slaughter 

Melany Rose Smith 

Eric Scott Snow, cum laude 

Diane Thwaite Solenberger, 

magna cum laude 
Richard M. Spaulding Jr., cum laude 
Andrew John Sterge, cum laude 
Robert Bruce Stewart, summa cum laude 
Colleen Marie Elizabeth Stoll 
Kevin Mark Storms 
Susan Sharer Strand 
Dennis Gordon Tabor 
Tamara June Taylor, magna cum laude 
Mark D. Tetsworth 
Laurence Lambert Thayer 
Laura Leah Thomas, cum laude 
Walter George Thomason, cum laude 
Ronald Paul Townsend, 

summa cum laude 
James Van Dessel Jr. 
Jason Schellenger Venuto 
Yoshiko Wakabavashi, magna cum laude 
John T. Walker, cum laude 
D. Stephen Wallin, cum laude 
Joseph Kevin Waters 
Jane Lee Watson, cum laude 
John Dewey Weaver III 
Daria Joy White 
Kirk Cecil Wilkenson, cum laude 
James Rush Wilson III 
John Marshall Wright 
Robert Alan Yeager, cum laude 
Brian Wesley Young, cum laude 
Phyllis Jo Zerrudo, cum laude 
Jeffrey Leighton Zierenberg 
Robert William Zweier 



176 



August 4, 1981 

Bachelor of Arts 



David Embry Abell 

Luke James Adrian 

William Milton Camp 

Katherine Annette Clay 

Peter A. Cooper 

Joseph Rover Davidson 

Dexter Turner Duncan 

Paul Stephen Eberle 

Kay Lynn Edmonds, magna cum laude 

Edgar Estes Folk IV 

Michael Bernard Graybeal 

Gregory Peter Gruendel 

James Michael Gurley 

George Harvey Hall Jr. 

Brian Edmond Heelan 

Victoria Ann Hill 

Allison Sanders Hines, cum laude 



Douglas Griffin Keith 

Ervin Eugene Lampert III 

Martha Jane Landstra 

Scott Robert McEwan 

Robert Anthony Meier 

Thomas D. Neilson 

Frances Ramsey Patterson 

Ann Larkin Phelps 

Linda Ann Seav 

Maureen Ann Sheehan 

Wiley Grant Shingleton 

Steven Bradlev Truitt 

Billy Gregory Tsintzos 

Ingram Dickinson Tynes 

Vivian Eunice Whitley, magna cum laude 

Michael Antonio Wisher 



August 4, 1981 

Bachelor of Science 



Walter Bryan Barger 
Audrey Carol Cabe 
Jane Hanby Champion 
Leslie Gray Frye Jr. 
Graydon Alvice Miller III 
Gary Michael Monroe 
Kurt David Navratil 



Catherine Anne Spargo 
Steven Ellwood Spencer 
Mark Joseph Sterner 
Randy Harland Stoltz 
Douglas John Warstler 
Caleb Dwight West III 



December 19, 1981 

Bachelor of Arts 



Janet Lvnne Alexander, cum laude 
Breon Jamie Golubin Allen 
duWayne George Amen 
Katherine Lynnette Amen 
Loper Lowrv Baldwin, cum laude 



Dean Franklin Barnes 
Donna Kay Cash, cum laude 
Audene Peggy Church, cum laude 
Catherine Louise Crawlev 
Edward Tavlor Dancv IV 





177 


Thomas Bayard De Loache III Ann Christine Meletis 


! Deborah Renee Doster, cum 


laude Stuart Coleman Moore 


Lydia Marie Eden 


John Edgar Reece II 


Diana Marie Ereth 


David Hadley Richardson 


Stephen Hugh Fuller 


Katherine Hudgins Robins 


Joel Thomas Gilbreath 


Christopher Isaac Sheaffer 


i Cyrus Edward Gwyn Jr. 


Lynne Marie Spencer, cum laude 


Charles Jeffrey Harper 


William Myles Taylor III 


James Byron Houser, magna 


cum laude Donna Terese Thornton 


Philip Charles Hrichak 


Mark Gerald Usdin 


John Ed Johnson III 


Jennifer Logan Weaver 


James Martin Kennedy 


Rodney Carlton Wesson 


Thomas Joseph Kieffer 


Robert Brenaman Wrenn Jr. 


Mary Anne McClure 


Carl Merritt Yow 


James Frederick McKinsey, 


cum laude 




December 19, 1981 


Bachelor of Science 


Terrence Burton Blanch 


Stewart D. Powers 


Thomas Edward Johnstone 


Johanna-Maria Iris Seifert-Shannon, 


Steven Bradley Larsen 


cum laude 


Michael Joseph Meyer 


Gary Keith Smith 


Edward Warren Newton 


Donna Cheryl Snipes 


Charles Eugene Pierce Jr. 






- ■ - -w, 


1 


i 


H 
■ 









178 



Honor Societies 



ODK & Mortar Board 



Members of the Class of 1981 



Jill Marie Allen 
Stephen Roland Berlin 
Mark Anderson Crabtree 
Susan Scott Darnell 
Richard Mark Feathers 
Arlesa Ann Fouts 
Trina Dare Griffin 
James Relerford Helvey III 
Melanie Ruth Jarratt 



Lynn Dee Knapp 
Jeffrey Neil Knight 
Stacy Lee Luks 
Julia Annette Myers 
Michael George Riley 
Amy Lynn Siemer 
Diane Thwaite Solenberger 
Michael Thomas Teixido 
Walter George Thompson 



Phi Beta Kappa 



Members of 
Gloria Beth Abels 
Jill Marie Allen 
Stephen Matthew Amidon 
Stacey Lynne Armstrong 
Stephen Roland Berlin 
Kenneth Robert Bramlett Jr. 
Paul Clark Brown Jr. 
Glenn Carsten Campbell 
John Lawton Capps 
Connie Ruth Clipp 
Claire Ellen Colley 
Michael Patrick Conrad 
Carol Elizabeth Copeland 
Susan Scott Darnell 
Anna Catherine Deal 
Kay Lynn Edmonds 
Sheryl Ann Gillikin 
Elizabeth Irani Graham 
Charles Parker Grannis 
James Richard Groome 
Nelson Smith Gwinn III 
Heidi Ann Hagen 
James Relerford Helvey III 
John George Holevas 
James Byron Houser 
Carol Ann Leuchtenberger 
Carol Lewis 
David Brian Marshall 

Catherine 



the Class of 1981 

Laurie Elizabeth McGuire 
Deni Gladieux Mclntyre 
John Rufus McNair Jr. 
Mary Lynne Millwood 
John Christopher Mullen 
Julia Annette Myers 
Susan Grace Myers 
John Raymond Nelson 
Eric Stuart Osborn 
Lennis Louise Pearcv 
Sarah Ellen Peterson 
Susan Elizabeth Prugh 
David Mark Riffe 
Michael George Riley 
David Prince Robertson 
Susan Leigh Rogers 
Cynthia Louise Sechler 
Susan Dale Shearin 
Anne Elizabeth Spencer 
Robert Bruce Stewart 
Julia Winifred Summerlin 
Stephen Powel Trippie 
Ronald Paul Townsend 
Janice Elaine Trull 
Patricia Anne Yecellio 
Yoshiko Wakabayashi 
Amy Rebecca Walters 
Craig Edwin Wolff 

Earle Woodard 



Enrollment 



179 



The College 

Seniors 

Juniors 

Sophomores 

Freshmen 

Unclassified 

Total 



Fall 1981 










Men 


Women 


Total 




498 


304 


802 




416 


315 


731 




461 


300 


761 




537 


308 


845 




14 


18 


32 



1,926 



1,245 



3,171 



The Graduate School 

(Reynolda Campus) 
Master's Program 
Doctoral Program 
Unclassified 

Total 



75 


131 


206 


15 


1 


16 


5 


13 


18 



95 



145 



240 



The Graduate School 

(Hawthorne Campus) 
Master's Program 
Doctoral Program 
Unclassified 

Total 



6 


11 


17 


43 


34 


77 


4 





4 



53 



45 



98 



The School of Law 



370 



140 



510 



The Babcock Graduate 








School of Management 








Master's Program 


143 


46 


189 


Executive Program 


61 


11 


72 


Total 


204 


57 


261 



The Bowman Gray 
School of Medicine 

Allied Health Programs 



323 

49 



104 

73 



427 
122 



Total 



3,020 



1,809 



4,829 



180 



Geographic Distribution — Undergraduates 



Alabama 

Alaska 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia 

Florida 

Georgia 

Hawaii 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 



Men 

1 







8 

2 

44 

19 

7 

115 

64 





3 



14 



9 

24 

12 

3 



3 







2 

122 



105 

796 



43 
1 
o 

95 
3 

47 


33 



Women 
4 

1 
1 
1 
6 
1 

14 

13 
5 

60 

42 



10 
2 
1 


16 



58 
5 
1 

2 

7 




1 

44 


26 

673 



15 
1 


34 
1 

33 


19 



Total 

11 

1 

1 

I 

14 

3 

58 

32 

12 

175 

106 



1 

41 

7 

2 

1 

30 

1 

1 

149 

29 

13 

5 



10 







3 

166 



131 

1,469 



58 

2 



129 

4 

80 



52 



Texas 


8 


6 


14 




United States Territories 


2 


1 


3 




Utah 













Vermont 


2 





2 




Virginia 


160 


116 


276 




Washington 













West Virginia 


23 


19 


42 




Wisconsin 


7 


1 


8 




Wyoming 


1 
Other Countries 





1 






Men 


Women 


Total 




Australia 







1 




Belgium 




1 


2 




Brazil 







1 




Canada 







3 




Colombia 







1 




Dominican Republic 







1 




France 







1 




Greece 







1 




Guyana 







1 




Japan 




1 


3 




Malaysia 







2 




Mexico 







1 




Netherlands 







1 




Panama 







1 




Sweden 







1 




Switzerland 




1 


1 




Turkey 







1 




United Kingdom 







1 




Venezuela 


\ ~ — ~" vr " T ^>— ~ 


2 


3 










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'■:-, ' -" 



\ 




An art exhibit in the lobby of the Scales Fine Arts Center 



182 

The Board of Trustees 



Terms Expiring December 31, 1982 

Joseph Branch, Raleigh Robert A. Culler, High Point 

Dewey H. Bridger Jr., Bladenboro Manuel E. Cannup, Greensboro 

Louise Brovhill, Lenoir Charles Cedric Davis, Farmville 

C. Frank Colvard Jr., West Jefferson John D. Larkins. Trenton 
William W. Leathers III, Rockingham 



Terms Expiring December 31, 1983 

Charles W. Cheek, Greensboro Pete Lovette, Wilkesboro 

Thomas H. Davis, Winston-Salem Claude A. McNeill Jr., Elkin 

C. C. Hope Jr., Charlotte Mary Lide Morris, Burlington 

John M. Lewis, Raleigh Dale Simmons. Mt. Airy 

Lonnie Williams, Wilmington 



Terms Expiring December 31, 1984 

Albert L Butler Jr., Winston-Salem Katharine Mountcastle, New Canaan. 

Egbert L. Davis Jr.. Winston-Salem Connecticut 

Mark Holt. Favetteville W. Bovd Owen, Wavnesville 

Petro Kulvnvch, Wilkesboro Leon L. Rice. Winston-Salem 

James W. Mason. Laurinburg Eugene Worrell. Charlottesville, 

Virginia 



Terms Expiring December 31, 1985 

Bert L. Bennett, Winston-Salem Weston P. Hatfield, Winston-Salem 

Robert P. Caldwell Sr.. Gastonia Alton H. McEachern. Greensboro 

R. Stuart Dickson. Charlotte J. Robert Philpott, Lexington 

Flovd Fletcher. Durham J. Smith Young. Lexington 
Jean H. Gaskin, Charlotte 



Officers 

(For one-vear terms beginning Januarv 1. 1982) 

C. C. Hope Jr., Charlotte, Chairman 

Charles W. Cheek, Greensboro, Vice-Chairman 

Elizabeth S. Drake, Winston-Salem. Secretarv 

John G. Williard, Winston-Salem, Treasurer and Assistant Secretarv 

Womble Garble Sandridge & Rice, Winston-Salem, General Counsel 

Leon H. Corbett Jr., Winston-Salem, Associate General Counsel 



183 

The Board of Visitors 



Arnold Palmer, Latrobe, Pennsylvania 
Chairman, University Board of Visitors 

James Alfred Martin Jr., Laurinburg 
Chairman, College Board of Visitors 

Wake Forest College and Graduate School 
Terms Expiring December 31, 1982 

Samuel H. Adler, Rochester, New York Albert R. Hunt Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Maya Angelou, Winston-Salem Graham A. Martin, Winston-Salem 

William L. Bondurant, Winston-Salem Martin Mayer, New York, New York 
Wallace Carroll, Winston-Salem Jasper D. Memory, Raleigh 

Ralph Ellison, New York, New York Bill Moyers, New York, New York 
Harold T. P. Hayes, New York, Eugene Owens, Charlotte 

New York 

Terms Expiring December 31, 1983 

George Anderson, Jacksonville, Florida Constance Gray, Winston-Salem 

A. R. Ammons, Ithaca, New York Charles U. Harris, Delaplane, Virginia 

Bert Bennett, Winston-Salem Hubert Humphrey, Greensboro 

John Chandler, Williamstown, James Alfred Martin Jr., 
Massachusetts New York, New York 

Vlerrimon Cuninggim, Winston-Salem Earl Slick, Winston-Salem 

Ronald Deal, Hickory Zachary T. Smith, Winston-Salem 

\rthur E. Earley, Cleveland, Ohio Feme Sticht, Winston-Salem 

Terms Expiring December 31, 1984 

David Bryant, S. Charleston, Jack Hatcher, Lebanon, New 

West Virginia Hampshire 

\urelia Gray Eller, Winston-Salem Connie William King, Nashville, 

"rank Forsyth, Winston-Salem Tennessee 

\nne Reynolds Forsyth, Winston-Salem John F. McNair III, Winston-Salem 
kanley Frank, Greensboro Wayne Oates, Louisville, Kentucky 

Edward Gould, Atlanta, Georgia Lorraine F. Rudolph, Winston-Salem 

Frank Willingham, Houston, Texas 

Terms Expiring December 31, 1985 

ierbert Brenner, Winston-Salem K. Wayne Smith, Washington, D. C. 

r . Hudnall Christopher Jr. Leland T. Waggoner, Short Hills, 

Winston-Salem New Jersey 

% Garland Herndon, Atlanta, Georgia Meade Willis, Winston-Salem 

rhomas W. Lambeth, Winston-Salem J. Tylee Wilson, Winston-Salem 

lobert Maloy, Washington, D. C. Judy Woodruff, Washington, D. C. 

Ex-Officio Members 

Jerry Attkisson, President, Alumni Council, Atlanta, Georgia 

James W. Mason, Chairman, Planning and Development Committee, 

Board of Trustees 




President James R. Scales 



185 

The Administration 



Date following name indicates year of appointment. 



University 

James R. Scales (1967) President 

B. A., Oklahoma Baptist; M.A., Ph.D., Oklahoma; Litt.D., 
Northern Michigan; LL.D., Alderson-Broaddus; LL.D., Duke; Litt.D., Belmont Abbey 

Edwin Graves Wilson (1946, 1951) Provost 

B.A., Wake Forest; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard 

Manson Meads (1947, 1963) Vice President for Health Affairs and 

B.A., California; M.D., Sc.D., Temple Director of the Medical Center 

[ohn G. Williard (1958) Vice President and Treasurer 

B.S., North Carolina (Chapel Hill); C.P.A., North Carolina 

Z. William Joyner Jr. ( 1 969) Vice President for Development 

B.A., Wake Forest 

Iissell H. Brantley Jr. (1953) Assistant to the President and 

B.A., Wake Forest Director of Communications 

.eon Corbett (1968) Associate General Counsel 

B.A., J.D.. Wake Forest 

loss A. Griffith (1966) Director of Equal Opportunity 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.Ed., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

College 

rhomas E. Mullen (1957) Dean of the College 

B.A., Rollins; M.A., Ph.D., Emory 

lobert Allen Dyer (1956) Associate Dean 

B.A., Louisiana State; Th.M., Ph.D., Southern Baptist Seminary 

roby A. Hale (1970) Assistant Dean and Director of Educational 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.Div., Duke; Ed.D.. Indiana Planning and Placement 

SJ. Rick Heatley (1970) Associate in Academic Administration 

B.A., Baylor; M.A., Ph.D., Texas and Associate Director 

of Educational Planning and Placement 

'atricia Adams Johansson (1969) Assistant to the Dean 

B.A., Winston-Salem State; M.A., Wake Forest of the College 

Graduate School 

lenry Smith Stroupe (1937) Dean of the Graduate School 

B.S., M.A., Wake Forest; Ph.D., Duke 

larold O. Goodman (1958) Associate Dean for Biomedical 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Minnesota Graduate Studies 



186 



School of Law 



John D. Scarlett (1955, 1979) 

B.A., Catawba; J.D., Harvard 

Leon H. Corbettjr. (1968) 
B.A., J.D., Wake Forest 

Robert F. Clodfelter (1981) 
LL.B., Duke 

Charles H. Taylor (1976) 
B.S.. J.D., Wake Forest 

Jean K. Hooks (1970) 
Laura L. Myers (1959) 



Dean of the School of Laul 

Associate Dear\ 

Associate Deai.i 
for Academic Affair: 

Director of Continuing 
Legal Education 

Director of Admissioni 
and Assistant to the Dear 1 

Director of Placemen 



Babcock Graduate School of Management 



Dean of the Babcock GraduaU 
School of Management 

Associate Dean foi 
Academic Affair'} 

Associate Dean 01 
Administration 



Edward L. Feltonjr. 

B.A., Richmond; B.D., Southeastern Seminary; 
MBA. DBA., Harvard 

William L. Bern (1979) 

B.S., Virginia Polytechnic; M.B.A.. 
Western Kentucky; D.B.A., Harvard 

Michael L. Rice (1980) 

B.S., M.B.A., Florida State; 

Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

James M. Clapper ( 1 975) Director of MBA Executive Prograr\ 

B.S., M.S., Rensselaer; Ph.D., Massachusetts 

lean B. Hopson (1970) Assistant Dear 

B.A., Murray State; M.S. in L.S., George Peabodv; M.B.A.. Wake Forest 

Bruce R. Hollidav (1981) 

B.A.. Davidson College; M.B.A.. Wake Forest 



Director of Admission* 



Bowman Gray School of Medicine 



Richard Janeway (1966) 

B.A., Colgate; M.D., Pennsylvania 

Nat E. Smith (1976) 

B.A.. Erskine; M.D., Georgia 

C. Nash Herndon (1942, 1966) 
B.A.. Duke; M.D., Jefferson 

J. Kiffin Penrv (1979) 

B.S., M.D., Wake Forest 

Harold O. Goodman (1958) 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Minnesota 

Clyde T. Hardy Jr. (1941) 
B.A.. Richmond 



Dean of the Bowman Grai 
School of Medicini 

Associate Deai 

Senior Associate Dean for Research Developmen 

Associate Dean for Research Developmen 
(Neurosaences 

Associate Dean fo 
Biomedical Graduate Stuaie 

Associate Dean for Patient Service 



187 

Warren H . Kennedy (1971) Associate Dean for Administration 

B.B.A., Houston 

John D. Tolmie (1970) Associate Dean for Student Affairs 

B.A., Hobart; M.D., McGill 

Emery C. Miller Jr. (1955) Associate Dean for Continuing; Education 

B.A., North Carolina (Chapel Hill); M.D., Johns Hopkins 

|ohn H. Felts (1978) Associate Dean for Admissions 

B.S., Wofford; M.D., South Carolina 

[ames C. Leist (1974) Assistant Dean for Continuing Education 

B.S., Southeastern Missouri State; M.S., Ed.D., Indiana 

. Dennis Hoban (1978) 

B.A., Villanova; M.S., Ed.D., Indiana Educano /,'. 



Director of the Office of 
cational Research and Services 



School of Business and Accountancy 

rhomas C. Taylor (1971) Dean f the Schod 

B.S., M.A., North Carolina (Chapel Hill); of Business and Accountancy 

Ph.D., Louisana State; C.P.A., North Carolina 

Summer Session 

'ercival Perry (1939, 1947) Dean of the Summer Session 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Rutgers; Ph.D.. Duke 

Student Services 

)avid Allen Hills (1960) Coordinator of Student Services 

B.A., Kansas; M.A., Ph.D., Iowa 

dark H. Reece (1956) Dean f Men 

B.S., Wake Forest 

.ula M. Leake (1964) Dean f Women 

B.A., Louisiana State; M.R.E., Southern Baptist Seminary 

Pward R. Cunnings ( 1 974) Director of Housing 

B.S.M, M.Ed., St. Lawrence S 

Michael Ford ( 1 98 1 ) Director of the College Union 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.Div., Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary 

Irian M. Austin (1975) Director of the Center for 

B.A.. Monmouth; M.S.Ed., Ph.D., Southern Illinois Psychological Services 

larianne Schubert (1977) Assistant Director of the Center for 

B.A., Dayton; M.A., Ph.D., Southern Illinois Psychological Services 

lary Ann H. Taylor (1961, 1978) Director of University Student Health Services 

B.S., M.D., Wake Forest 

Campus Ministry 

dgar D. Christman (1956, 1961) Chaplain 

B.A., J.D., Wake Forest; B.D., Southeastern Baptist Seminary; 
S.T.M., Union Seminary 



188 



nc 



David L. Fouche Assistant Chaplain a 

B.A., Furman; Baptist Campus Miwstei 

M. Div.. Southeastern Baptist Seminary 

Records and Institutional Research 

Ben M. Seelbinder (1959) Director of Records and Institutional Research 

B.A., Mississippi Delta State; M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Margaret R. Perry (1947) Registr 

B.S., South Carolina 

Personnel 

James L. Ferrell ( 1975) Director of Personne 

B.A.. North Carolina (Chapel Hill); NFS.. Virginia Commonwealth 

Admissions and Financial Aid 

William G. Starling ( 1958) Director of Admissions and Financial Ah 

B.B.A.. Wake Forest 

Shirlev P. Hamrick (1957) Associate Director of Admission}, 

B.A., North Carolina (Chapel Hill); M.A. in Ed.. Wake Forest 

W. Douglas Bland ( 1975) Assistant Director of Admission 

B.A., M.A. in Ed.. Wake Forest and Financial Ali 

Lyne S. Gamble (1978) Assistant Director of Admission 

B.A.. Millsaps 

Karen A. Jaenke (1980) Admissions and Financia 

B.A., Wake Forest Aid Counsel 

Suzette Jordan ( 1 98 1 ) Admissions and Financia 

B.A.. Wake Forest Aid Counselo' 

Educational Planning and Placement 

Tobv A. Hale (1970) Assistant Dean and Director of Educationa 

B.A.. Wake Forest; M.Div.. Duke; Ed.D.. Indiana Planning and Placemen 

N. Rick Heatlev (1970) Associate in Academic Administratwi 

B.A., Baylor; M.A.. Ph.D.. Texas and Associate Directo 

of Educational Planning and Placemen 

Communications and Publications 

Russell H. Brantlev Jr. (1953) Assistant to the President ant 

B.A.. Wake Forest Director of Communication 

Martha W. Lentz (1973) University Publications Edito 

B.A., North Carolina (Chapel Hill); MB. A., Wake Forest 

Development and Alumni Activities 

G. William Jovner Jr. (1969) Vice President for Developmen 

B.A.. Wake Forest 



189 



ulius H. Corpening (1969) 

B.A., Wake Forest; B.D., Southern Baptist Seminary 

lobert D. Mills (1972) 
B.A., Wake Forest 

Lobert T. Baker (1978) 

B.A., M.S., George Peabodv 

linta Aycock McNally (1978) 
B.A., Wake Forest 

Lobert D. Thompson (1982) 
B.A., Wake Forest 

ames Reid Morgan (1980) 
B.A.,J. D., Wake Forest 



Director of Development 
and Estate Planning 

Director of Alumni Activities 

Director of Corporate 
Relations and the Law Fund 



Director of the College Fund 

Assistant to the Director of Alumni Activities 

Foundations Officer 



Dhn G. Williard (1958) 



Financial Affairs 



Vice President and Treasurer 



B.S., North Carolina (Chapel Hill); C.P.A., North Carolina 

Controller and Assistant Treasurer 



arlos O. Holder (1969) 
B.B.A., Wake Forest 

J. Derald Hagen (1978) 

B.S., Virginia Polytechnic 



Assistant Controller 



Libraries 

[errill G. Berthrong (1964) 

B.A., Tufts; M.A., Fletcher; Ph.D.. Pennsylvania 

ichardj. Murdoch (1966) 

B.A., Pennsylvania Military; M.S. in L.S., Villanova 

enneth A. Zick II (1975) 

B.A., Albion; J. D., Wayne State; M.L.S., Michigan 

ivian L. Wilson (1960) 

B.A., Coker; B.S. in L.S., George Peabody 

:an B. Hopson (1970) 

B.S. in Ed., Murray State; M.S. in L.S., 
George Peabody; M.B.A., Wake Forest 



Director of Libraries 

Assistant to the Director and 
Curator of Rare Books 

Director of Law Library Seniices 
Librarian of the School of Law 



ichael D. Sprinkle (1972) 

B.A., M.S. in L.S., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 



Librarian of the Babcock Graduate 
School of Management 

Librarian of the Bowman Gray 
School of Medicine 



Athletics 

Eugene Hooks (1956) Director of Athletics 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.Ed., North Carolina (Chapel Hill); Ed.D., George Peabody 

Jrothy Casey ( 1 949) Director of Women 's Athletics 

B.S., North Carolina (Greensboro); M.A., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 



190 



Other Administrative Offices 



Nicholas B. Bragg (1970) 
B.A., Wake Forest 

Richard T. Clay (1956) 
B.B.A., Wake Forest 

Thomas M. Elmore (1962) Director of Counselor Educatioi 

B.A., Wake Forest: M.A., George Peabodv: Ph.D.. Ohio State 



Executive Director of Reynolda Horn 
Director of University Store. 



Director of the Art Caller 

Coordinator of the Honors Program 

Coordinator of London Program 

Director of Concert, 

Director of Teacher Educatioi 



Victor Faccinto (1978) 

B.A.. M.A.. California 

Paul M. Gross Jr. (1959) 

B.S.. Duke; Ph.D.. Broun 

David W. Hadlev (1966) 

B.A.. Wake Forest; A.M.. Ph.D.. Harvard 

David B. Lew (1976) 

B.M.. M.A.. Ph.D., Eastman 

John H. Litcher (1973) 

B.S., Winona State; M.A., Ph.D.. Minnesota 

Rodnev Meyer (1980) 

B.A.. Brown; M.A., Ph.D.. Minnesota 

John V. Mochnick (1976) 

B.M.. Heidelberg; M.M.. Indiana; D.M.A.. Cincinnati 

Harold S. Moore (1953) 
B.M.E., Virginia 

Herman ]. Preseren (1953) Director of the Educational Media Cente 

B.S.. California State (Pennsylvania); M.A.. Columbia 
Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Henry B. Stokes (1977) Director of Denominational Relation, 

B.A., Wake Forest; Th.B., Southern Baptist Seminar) 

Harold C. Tedford (1965) Director of Theatr, 

B.A.. Ouachita; M.A.. Arkansas; Ph.D.. Louisiana State 

David Williams Director of Debat 

B.A.. M.A., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Donald H. Wolfe ( 1968) Associate Director of Theatr, 

B.S., M.S.. Southern Illinois; Ph.D.. Cornel 



Director of the Offic 
for Grants and Contract 

Director of Choir. 
Director of the Physical Plan 



191 



The Undergraduate Faculties 



Date following name indicates year of appointment. 

Carles M. Allen (1941) Professor of Biology 

B.S., M.S., Wake Forest; Ph.D., Duke 

lalph D. Amen (1962) Professor of Biology 

B.A.. M.A., Northern Colorado; M.B.S., Ph.D., Colorado 

ohn L. Andronica ( 1 969) Associate Professor of Classical Languages 

B.A., Holy Cross; M.A., Boston College; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 

ohn William Angell (1955) Professor of Religion 

B.A., Wake Forest; S.T.M., Andover Newton; Th.M., Ph.D., Southern Baptist Seminary 

lianca Artom (1975) 

Irian M. Austin (1975) 

B.A., Monmouth; Ph.D., Southern Illinois 

i. Wallace Baird (1963) 

B.A., Berea; Ph.D., Wisconsin 

usan E. Balinsky (1980) 

B.S., S.U.N.Y. (Oneonta); M.S., Indiana 

.. Pendleton Banks (1954) 

B.A., Furman; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard 



ames P. Barefield (1963) 

B.A., M.A., Rice; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 

.ichard C. Barnett (1961) 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.Ed., Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel H 

ahn V. Baxley (1968) Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., M.S., Georgia Tech; Ph.D., Wisconsin 



Lecturer in Romance Languages 
Lecturer in Psychology 

Professor of Chemistry 

Instructor in Physical Education 

Professor of Anthropology 

Associate Professor of Histoiy 

Professor of History 



iatherine-Anne Beaudry (1981) 
B.A., Catholic; M.A., Columbia 

[. Kenneth Bechtel (1981) 
B.A., M.A., North Dakota 

.obert C. Beck (1959) 
B.A., Ph.D., Illinois 

•onald B. Bergev (1978) 
B.S.. M.A., Wake Forest 

lerrill G. Berthrong (1964) 

B.A., Tufts; M.A., Fletcher; Ph.D., Pennsylvania 

'eborah L. Best (1972, 1978) 



B.A., M.A., Wake Forest; Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 



Instructor in Romance Languages 

Instructor in Sociology 

Professor of Psychology 

Instructor in Physical Education 

Associate Professor of History 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 



*On leave, 1981-82 
"Part-time 



192 



Assistant Professor of Biolog) 

Lecturer in Art Histoid' 
(London, 

Visiting Assistant Professor of Englisl' 

Kenan Professor of Humanities 
Licence, E.E.S., Agregation, Paris; Litt.D., Smith, Mount Holyoke, Alleghany 
Duke, Oberlin, Dickinson, Rutgers, Wake Forest, Brown, Wisconsin, New York 
Massachusetts, Kalamazoo; L.H.D., Wilson, Colby, Michigan, Davis and Elkins' . 
LL.D.. Middleburv 



Ramunas Bigelis (1979) 

B.S., Illinois (Chicago); Ph.D., Purdue 

***David Bindman (1977) 

B.A., M.A., Oxford; Ph.D., Courtauld 

David G. Brailow (1979) 

B.A., Amherst; M.A., Ph.D., Oregon 

Germaine Bree (1973) 



Robert W. Brehme (1959) 

B.S., Roanoke; M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina 

*Carole L. Browne (1980) 

B.S., Hartford; Ph.D., Syracuse 

* Robert A. Browne (1980) 

B.S., M.S., Dayton; Ph.D., Syracuse 

David B. Broyles (1966) 



B.A., Chicago; B.A., Florida; M.A., Ph.D., California (Los Angeles) 



Professor of Physic 
Assistant Professor of Biolog 
Assistant Professor of Biolog 
Associate Professor of Politic 



George McLeod Brvan (1956) 

B.A., M.A., Wake Forest; B.D., Ph.D., Yale 

Shasta M. Bryant (1966) 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Julian Lopez Bueno (1978) 

Ph.B., Gregorian (Rome); B.A., Pan-American; 
M.A., Ph.D., Texas Tech 

Jerry M. Burger (1980) Assistant Professor of Psycholog 

B.S., M.S., California State (Fresno); Ph.D., Missouri (Columbia 



Professor of Religio : 

Professor of Romance Languagi 

Visiting Assistant Professor t 
Romance Languagi 



**Julian C. Burroughs Jr. (1958) 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Ph.D., Michig 

***Bonnie M. Carey (1982) 

B.A., Boston; M.A.T., Assumption 

Candide Carrasco (1981) 

L es L., M. es L., Montpellier (France) 

Richard D. Carmichael (1971) 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.A., Ph.D.. Duke 

***Wallace Carroll (1974) 



Professor of Speech Communicatio 

Instructor in Romance Language 

Instructor in Romance Languag 

Professor of Mathemati 

S( m J. Ervin Jr. University Lectur 



B. Litt., Marquette; LL.D., Duke; Litt.D., Wake forest, Marquette 



n 



*** Part-time, spring 1982 
*Part-time 
**On leave, spring 1982 



193 

John A. Carter Jr. (1961) Professor of English 

B.A., Virginia; M.A., Ph.D., Princeton 

Dorothy Casey ( 1 949) Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., North Carolina (Greensboro); M.A., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

David W. Catron (1963) Associate Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Furman; Ph.D., George Peabody 

I Cynthia L. Caywood (1981) Instructor in English 

B.A., Kansas; M.A., Exeter (England) 

; Glenn L. Clark Jr. (1976) Lecturer in Business 

B.S., Ohio State; M.B.A., Kentucky 

Maxine L. Clark ( 1 980) Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Cincinnati; A.M., Ph.D., Illinois 

Marvin S. Coats (1976) Lecturer in Art 

B.S.A., East Texas State; M.F.A., Oklahoma 

John E. Collins (1970) Associate Professor of Religion 

B.S., M.S,. Tennessee; B.D.. Southeastern Baptist Seminary; Ph.D., Princeton 

Gary A. Cook (1975) Instructor in Art 

B.F.A., Michigan State; M.F.A., Northern Illinois 

Leon P. Cook Jr. (1957) Associate Professor of Accountancy 

B.S., Virginia Polytechnic; M.S., Tennessee; C.P.A., Arkansas 

Nancy J. Cotton (1977) Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Texas; M.A., Wisconsin; Ph.D., Columbia 

Cyclone Covey (1968) Professor of History 

B.A., Ph.D., Stanford ' 

Patricia M. Cunningham ( 1 978) Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A., Rhode Island; M.S., Florida State; Ed.S. Indiana State; Ph.D., Georgia 

Janine B. Cutchin (1981) Instructor in Anthropology 

B.A., North Carolina (Chapel Hill); M.A., George Washington 

! Sayeste A. Daser ( 1 978) Assistant Professor of B usiness 

B.A., Middle East Tech (Ankara); M.S., Ege (Izmir); Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

J. William Dellastatious ( 1 975) Lecturer in Physical Education 

B.S., M.S., Missouri 

^run P. Dewasthali (1975) Associate Professor of Business 

B.S., Bombay; M.S., Ph.D., Delaware 

|ohn F. Dimmick (1961) Associate Professor of Biology 

B.S., M.S., Western Illinois; Ph.D., Illinois 

Donald V. Dimock Jr. (1970) Associate Professor of Biology 

B.A., New Hampshire; M.S., Florida State; Ph.D., California (Santa Barbara) 



*On leave, 1981-82 
**On leave, spring 1982 
■** Part-time 



194 

*James H. Dodding (1979) Visiting Lecturer in Theatrfl 

**Joseph Dodson ( 1977) Visiting Lecturer in Education 

B.A., Western Carolina: M.Ed.. Ed.D., Georgia 

Jerome R. Dollard (1980) Adjunct Professor of Religiori 

B.A.. St. Benedict's; S.T.B.. Belmont Abbey; M.A.. Ph.D.. Catholic 

tThomas E. Dougherty Jr. (1977) Visiting Lecturer in Religior. 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.Div., Ph.D.. Southern Baptist Seminary 

Robert H. Dufort (1961) Professor of Psychology 

B.A.. Ph.D.. Duke 

Robert Allen Dyer (1956) Professor of Religior, 

B.A., Louisiana State; Th.M.. Ph.D.. Southern Baptist Seminary 

John R. Earle (1963) Professor of Sociology^ 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A.. Ph.D.. North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

tC. Drew Edwards (1980) Visiting Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Furman; M.A.. Wake Forest; Ph.D.. Florida State 

ttDonald L. Ellis (1981) Visiting Instructor in Educatior\ 

B.M.Ed., Houghton; M.M.Ed.. North Carolina (Greensboro) 

Leo Ellisonjr. (1957) Assista nt Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., M.S.. Northwestern State 

Thomas M. Elmore (1962) Professor of Counseling Psychology 

B.A.. Wake Forest: M.A.. George Peabodv; Ph.D.. Ohio State 

Gerald W. Esch (1965) Professor of Biology 

B.S.. Colorado College; M.S., Ph.D.. Oklahoma 

Andrew V. Ettin (1977) Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Rutgers; M.A.. Ph.D.. Washington (St. Louis) 

Herman E. Eure (1974) Associate Professor of Biology 

B.S., Maryland State; Ph.D.. Wake Forest 

David K. Evans (1966) Associate Professor of Anthropology 

B.S.. Tulane; Ph.D., California (Berkeley) 

Stephen Ewing (1971) Associate Professor of Business 

B.S., Howard Pavne: MB. A.. Baylor: D.B.A.. Texas Tech 

***Victor Faccinto (1981) Instructor in Art 

B.A.. M.A.. California State (Sacramento I 

Philippe R. Falkenberg (1969) Associate Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Queen's (Ontario): Ph.D.. Duke 



*Spring 1982 
**Part-time. spring 1982 
tPart-time 

ft Part-time. fall. 1981 
***Part-time 



195 

)oranne Fenoaltea (1977) Associate Professor of Romance Languages 

B.A., Mount Holyoke; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard 

ack D. Fleer ( 1 964) Professor of Politics 

B.A., Oklahoma Baptist; M.S., Florida State; Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

)oyle R. Fosso (1964) Professor of English 

A.B., Harvard; M.A., Michigan; Ph.D., Harvard 

lalph S. Fraser (1962) Professor of German 

B.A., Boston; M.A., Syracuse; Ph.D., Illinois 

)onald E. Frey (1972) Associate Professor of Economics 

B.A., Wesleyan; M.Div., Yale; Ph.D., Princeton 

Caroline S. Fullerton (1969) Instructor in Theatre Arts 

B.A., Rollins; M.A., Texas Christian 

Charles V. Ganelin, (1980) Instructor in Romance Languages 

A.B., Denison; M.A., Chicago 

vey C. Gentry (1949) Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Wake Forest; B.S., New York; M.A., Ph.D., Duke 

. Whitfield Gibbons (1971) Adjunct Associate Professor of Biology 

B.S., M.A., Alabama; Ph.D., Michigan State 

Ihristopher Giles (1951) Assistant Professor of Music 

B.S., Florida Southern; M.A., George Peabodv 

Kathleen Glenn (1974) Associate Professor of Romance Languages 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Stanford 

lae Jean Go (1980) Instructor in Speech Communication 

B.A., Tennesse; M.A., Illinois and Theatre Arts 

.ichard T. Godfrey (1981) Lecturer in Art (London) 

B.A., Chelsea School of Art (England) 

alkrishna Govind Gokhale (1960) Professor of History and Asian Studies 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Bombay 

ouis R. Goldstein (1979) Assistant Professor of Music 

B.M., Oberlin; M.F.A., California Institute of the Arts; D.M.A., Eastman 

.uben L. Gomez (1981) Instructor in Romance Languages 

B.A., New York; M.A., South Florida 

larold O. Goodman (1958) Adjunct Professor of Biology 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Minnesota 

'homas F. Gossett (1967) Professor of English 

B.A., M.A., Southern Methodist; Ph.D.. Minnesota 

aul M. Gross Jr. (1959) Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Duke; Ph.D., Brown 



*Part-time 
*On leave, fall 1981 
tOn leave, spring 1982 
■ Part-time, fall 1 982 



196 



William H. Gullev (1966) 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

David W. Hadlev (1966) 

B.A., Wake Forest; A.M.. Ph.D.. Harvard 

Gary W. Hall 

A.B., Atlantic Christian; M.A. Wake Forest 

*Claire H. Hammond (1978) 

B.A.. Mar) Washington; Ph.D., Virginia 

J. Daniel Hammond (1978) 

B.A., Wake Forest; Ph.D., Virginia 

Emmett Willard Hamrick (1952) 

B.A., North Carolina (Chapel Hill); Ph.D., Duke 



Phillip J. Hamrick Jr. (1956) 

B.S., Morris Harvey; Ph.D., Duke 

Carl V. Harris (1956) 

B.A., Wake Forest; B.D., S.T.M., Yale; Ph.D., Duke 

Catherine T. Harris (1980) 

A.B., Lenoir Rhvne; M.A., Duke; Ph.D., Georgia 

*Lucille S. Harris (1957) 
B.A., B.M., Meredith 

**Negley Boyd Harte (1978) 

B.S., London School of Economics 

Ysbrand Haven (1965) 

Candidate, Doctorandus. Doctor. Rijks (Netherlands) 



Associate Professor of Sociology] 

Associate Professor of History, 

Instructor in Physical Education 

Instructor in Economics 

Assistant Professor of Economics, 

Professor of Religior, 

Professor of Chemistry, 

Professor of Classical Languages 

Assistant Professor of Sociology] 

Instructor in Music 



Lecturer in History, 
(London) 

Professor of Physics\ 



Elmer K. Havashi (1973) Associate Professor of Mathematics- 

B.A., California (Davis); M.S.. San Diego State; Ph.D.. Illinois 

Michael D. Hazen (1974) Associate Professor of Speech Communication! 

B.A., Seattle Pacific; M.A., Wake Forest; Ph.D., Kansas 



Robert A. Hedin (1980) 

B.A.. Luther; M.F.A.. Alaska 

Roger A. Hegstrom (1969) 

B.A., St. Olaf; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard 

***Robert M. Helm (1940) 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Ph.D., Duke 

J. Edwin Hendricks (1961) 

B.A., Furman; M.A., Ph.D., Virginia 

Marcus B. Hester (1963) 

B.A., Wake Forest; Ph.D., Vanderbilt 



Visiting Lecturer in English 

Professor of Chemistry* 

Professor of Philosophy] 

Professor of History 

Professor of Philosophy 



* Part-time 
**Part-time, spring 1 982 
***()n leave, spring 1982 



197 



Gregg L. Hill (1982) Assistant Professor of Military Science 

B.S., North Carolina (Greensboro) 

David Allen Hills (1960) Associate Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Kansas; M.A., Ph.D., Iowa 

Charles S. Hinson Jr. (1981) Instructor in Mathematics 

B.S., M.S., Wake Forest 

Willie L. Hinze (1975) Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., M.A., Sam Houston State; Ph.D., Texas A & M 

Fred L. Horton Jr. (1970) Associate Professor of Religion 

B.A., North Carolina (Chapel Hill); B.D., Union Seminary; Ph.D., Duke 

William L. Hottinger (1970) Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., Slippery Rock; M.S., Ph.D., Illinois 

Fredric T. Howard (1966) Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., M.A., Vanderbilt; Ph.D., Duke 

Sarah Hutslar (1977) Visiting Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., Ohio State; M.Ed., Miami; Ph.D., Ohio State 

Richard P. Hydell (1981) Assistant Professor of Economics 

B.A., Oberlin; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Delmer P. Hylton (1949) Professor of Accountancy 

B.S., M.B.A., Indiana; C.P.A., Indiana 

Charles F. Jackels (1977) Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B. Chem., Minnesota; Ph.D., Washington 

Susan C. Jackels ( 1 977) Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.A., Carleton; Ph.D., Washington 

Mordecai J. Jaffe (1980) Babcock Professor of Botany 

B.S., C.C.N. Y.; Ph.D., Cornell 

David E. Janney (1980) Assistant Professor of Military Science 

B.S., University of Tennessee (Knoxville) 

Patricia Adams Johansson (1969) Instructor in English 

B.A., Winston-Salem State; M.A., Wake Forest 

vV. Dillon Johnston (1973) Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Vanderbilt; M.A., Columbia; Ph.D., Virginia 

Richard R. M. Jones (1980) Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Tennessee; Ph.D., California Institute of Technology 

Catherine A. Jourdan (1981) Adjunct Instructor in Psychology 

B.A., East Carolina; M.Ed., Wake Forest 

/ictor Kamendrowsky (1980) Instructor in History 

B.A., M.A., San Francisco State 

*On leave, spring 1982 
s *Spring 1982 

tOn leave 1981-82 
'tPart-time 



198 



Jav R. Kaplan (1981) Adjunct Assistant Professor of Anthropology 

B.A., Swarthmore; M.A., Ph.D., Northwestern 

Paul H. D. Kaplan (1980) Instructor in Ar, 

B.A.. Hampshire; M.A., Boston 

Alonzo W. Kenion (1956) Professor of English 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Duke 

Ralph C. Kennedy III (1976) Assistant Professor of Philosoph; 

B.A., Ph.D., California (Berkeley) 

William C. Kerr (1970) Associate Professor of Physic's 

B.S., Wooster; Ph.D., Cornell 

Ellen E. Kirkman (1975) Associate Professor of Mathematic* 

B.A., Wooster; M.A., M.S., Ph.D., Michigan State 

Robert Knott (1975) Associate Professor of Ar 1 , 

B.A., Stanford; M.A., Illinois; Ph.D., Pennsylvania 

Raymond E. Kuhn (1968) Professor of Biologi 

B.S., Carson-Newman; Ph.D., Tennessee 

James Kuzmanovich (1972) Associate Professor of Mathematic) 

B.S., Rose Polytechnic; Ph.D., Wisconsin 

Hugo C. Lane (1973) Assistant Professor of Biologj 

Licenciate of the Biological Sciences, Doctorate of the Biological Sciences, Geneva 

Annette LeSiege (1975) Associate Professor of Musil 

B.A., M.A., San Jose State; Ph.D., Eastman 

David B. Levy (1976) Assistant Professor of Musi: 

B.M., M.A., Ph.D.. Eastman 

Charles M. Lewis (1968) Associate Professor of Philosoph 

B.A., Wake Forest; Ph.D., Vanderbilt; Th.M.. Harvard 

Robert H. Lewis (1979) Assistant Professor of Military Scienc\ 

B.S., North Carolina A & T 

John H. Litcher (1973) Associate Professor of Education 

B.S., Winona State; M.A., Ph.D., Minnesota 

Allan D. Louden (1977) Instructor in Speech Communication 

B.A., Montana State; M.A., Montana 

Robert W. Lovett (1962, 1968) Associate Professor of Englisi 

B.A., Oglethorpe; M.A.T., Ph.D.. Emory 

Murdina D. MacDonald (1981) Instructor in Religion 

B.A., Hawaii; M. Div., Southeastern Baptist Seminary 

Bruce D. MacQueen (1980) Visiting Assistant Professo 

B.A., Oklahoma; M.A., California (Santa Barbara); of Classical Language 

Ph.D. Iowa 

Barry G. Maine (1981) Instructor in Englis, 

B.A., Virginia; M.A., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Sam T. Manoogian (1977) Adjunct Instructor in Psychol 

B.A., Duke; M.A.. Wake Forest; Ph.D., St. Louis 



199 



Vfilorad R. Margitic (1978) Associate Professor of Romance Languages 

M.A., Leiden (Netherlands); Ph.D., Wayne State 

Ciregorio C. Martin (1976) Associate Professor of Romance Languages 

Diplome, Salamanca (Spain); M.A., Ph.D., Pittsburgh 

3eorge Eric Matthews Jr. (1979) Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.S., Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

f . Gaylord May (1961) Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Wofford; M.A., Ph.D., Virginia 

o Whitten May (1972) Visiting Assistant Professor of 

B.S., Virginia; M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina (Greensboro) Speech Communication 

•V. Graham May (1961) Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Wofford; M.A., Ph.D., Virginia 

Donna Mayer-Martin (1976) Assistant Professor of Music 

B.M., St. Mary (Kansas); M.M., Ph.D., Cincinnati 

asper L. McBride (1980) Assistant Professor of Military Science 

B.S., Virginia Polytechnic 

ames C. McDonald (1960) Professor of Biology 

B.A., Washington (St. Louis); M.A., Ph.D., Missouri 

ames G. McDowell (1965) Associate Professor of History 

B.A., Colgate; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 

Dolly A. McPherson (1974) Lecturer in English 

B.A., Southern; M.A., Boston 

itephen Philip Messier (1981) Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., M.S., Rhode Island; Ph.D., Temple 

iarry B. Miller (1947) Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

oseph O. Milner (1969) Associate Professor of Education 

B.A., Davidson; M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Triton T. Mitchell ( 1 96 1 ) Professor of Religion 

B.A., Wake Forest; B.D., Yale; S.T.M., Union Seminary; Ph.D., New York 

ohn V. Mochnick (1976) Assistant Professor of Music 

B.M., Heidelberg; M.M., Indiana; D.M.A., Cincinnati 

ohn C. Moorhouse (1969) Professor of Economics 

B.A., Wabash; Ph.D., Northwestern 

^arl C. Moses (1964) Associate Professor of Politics 

A.B., William and Mary; M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Villiam M. Moss ( 1 97 1 ) Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Davidson; Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 



*On leave, spring 1982 
*Part-time 



200 



Thomas E. Mullen (1957) Professor of History 

B.A., Rollins; M.A.. Ph.D.. Emory 

Matthew P. Murray Jr. (1981) Professor of Military Science 

B.A., Florida State; M.A.. Middlebun 

Rebecca Myers (1981) Instructor in Physical Education 

B.S., M.A., Ball State 

Candelas M. Newton (1978) Visiting Assistant Professor 

B.A., Salamanca (Spain); M.A.. Ph.D.. Pittsburgh of Romance Languages 

Linda N. Nielsen (1974) Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A.. Stetson; M.S., Ed.D., Tennessee 

Ronald E. Noftle (1967) Professor of Chemistr 

B.S., New Hampshire; Ph.D., Washington 

John W. Nowell (1945) Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Wake Forest: Ph.D.. North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

James C. O'Flaherty (1947) Professor of German 

B.A.. Georgetown College; M.A.. Kentucky; Ph.D.. Chicago 

A. Thomas 01i\e (1961) Associate Professor of Biology 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.A., Ph.D.. North Carolina State 

Gillian Rose Overing (1979) \'isiting Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Lancaster (England): M.A.. Ph.D., S.L.N. V. (Buffalo) 

Jeanne Owen (1956) Professor of Business Law 

B.S., North Carolina (Greensboro); M.C.S., Indiana; J. D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

John E. Parker Jr. (1950) Professor of Education and Romance Languages 

B.A., Wake Forest: M.A., Ph.D., Syracuse 

Willie Pearson Jr. (1980) Assistant Professor of Sociology 

B.A., Wiley; M.A.. Atlanta; Ph.D.. Southern Illinois (Carbondale) 

Philip J. Perricone (1967) Associate Professor of Sociology 

B.S., M.A., Florida; Ph.D.. Kentucky 

Perciyal Perry (1939, 1947) Professor of History 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A.. Rutgers; Ph.D.. Duke 

Da\'id A. Petreman (1981) Instructor in Romance Languages 

B.A., Illinois Wesleyan: M.A.. Iowa 

Elizabeth Phillips (1957) Professor of English^ 

B.A., North Carolina (Greensboro); M.A., Iowa; Ph.D.. Pennsylvania 

*Terisio Pignatti (1971) Visiting Professor of Art Histoty 

Ph.D., Padua (Venice) 

Gay S. Pitts (1981) Instructor in Education 

B.S., East Carolina 



*Part-time, spring 1982 



201 



Margaret F. Plemmons (1982) 

B.A., George Washington; M.S., West Chester State 

\ndrew W. Polk III (1977) 

B.F.A., Memphis State; M.F.A., Indiana 

Lee Harris Potter (1965) 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Herman J. Preseren (1953) 

B.S., California State (Pennsylvania); M.A., Columbia; 
Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Gregory D. Pritchard (1968) 



Instructor in Chemistry 

Instructor in Art 

Professor of English 

Professor of Education 

Professor of Philosophy 



B.A., Oklahoma Baptist; B.D., Southern Baptist Seminary; Ph.D., Columbia 

reresa Radomski (1977) Instructor in Music 

B.M., Eastman; M.M., Colorado 

f. Don Reeves (1967) Professor of Education 

B.A., Mercer; B.D., Th.M., Southern Baptist Seminary; Ed.D., Columbia 



Associate Professor of Politics 



fon M. Reinhardt (1964) 

B.A., Birmingham-Southern; M.A., Ph.D., Tulane 

Walter J. Rejeskijr. (1978) Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., Norwich; M.A., Ph.D., Connecticut 

Instructor in English 

Professor of Physical Education 

Professor of Politics 

Adjunct Professor of Biology 

Professor of Psychology 

Instructor in Mathematics 

Assistant Professor of Education 

Professor of Romance Languages 

Lecturer in Roma?ice Languages 

Assistant Professor of English 



vlark Rigney Reynolds (1979) 

B.A., William and Mary; M.A., Exeter (England) 

3 aul M. Ribisl (1973) 

B.S., Pittsburgh; M.A., Kent State; Ph.D., Illinois 

3. H. Richards Jr. (1952) 

B.A., Texas Christian; M.A., Ph.D., Duke 

kephen H. Richardson (1963) 

B.A., California; M.S., Ph.D., Southern California 

Dharles L. Richman (1968) 

B.A., Virginia; M.A., Yeshiva; Ph.D., Cincinnati 

kephen P. Richters (1979) 
B.S., Vassar; M.S., Brown 

^eonard P. Roberge (1974) 

B.A., New Hampshire; M.A., Atlanta; Ed.D., Maine 

Vfary Frances Robinson (1952) 

B.A., Wilson; M.A., Ph.D., Syracuse 

iva Marie Rodtwitt (1966) 

Can. Philol., Oslo (Norway) 

Michael Roman (1973) 

A.B., Harvard; M.A., Ph.D., Pennsylvania 



*Part-time, spring 1982 
*On leave, 1981-82 



202 



Robert P. Rooney (1981) Visiting Assistant Professor of Chemist* 

B.S., North Carolina State; Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

**John D. Rovster (1981) Instructor in Business and Accountant 

B.A., Virginia Military Institute; M.A., Virginia Polytechnic 



**S. Gayle Russell (1981) 

B.A., Missouri (Columbia); M.A. South Florida 

Wilmer D. Sanders (1954, 1964) 

B.A., Muhlenberg; M.A., Ph.D., Indiana 

John W. Sawyer (1956) 

B.A., M.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Ph.D.. Missouri 

Donald O. Schoonmaker (1965) 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Ph.D., Princeton 

***Marianne A. Schubert (1979) 

B.A., Dayton; M.A.. Ph.D., Southern Illinois 

Richard D. Sears (1964) 

B.A., Clark; M.A., Ph.D., Indiana 

Ben M. Seelbinder (1959) 

B.A., Mississippi Delta State; M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hi 

***Dorothy Jean Carter Seeman (1976) Visiting Assistant Professor of Psycholog. 

B.A., Wake Forest; B.S., Ph.D., Georgia 

Timothy F. Sellner (1970) Associate Professor of Germar 

B.A., Michigan; M.A., Wayne State; Ph.D., Michigan 



Visiting Lecturer in Anthropolog 

Associate Professor of Gennai 

Professor of Mathematw 

Associate Professor of Politic 

Lecturer in Educatioi 

Associate Professor of Politici 

Professor of Mathematic 



Lecturer in Journalise 
Assistant Professor of Military Scienci 



Bynum G. Shaw (1965) 
B.A., Wake Forest 

Curtis L. Shelton (1981) 

B.S., East Tennessee State 

Howard W. Shields (1958) Professor of Physic! 

B.S., North Carolina (Chapel Hill); M.S., Pennsylvania State; Ph.D., Duke 

Franklin R. Shirley (1948) Professor of Speech Communicatwr. 

B.A., Georgetown; M.A., Columbia; Ph.D., Florida 

Richard L. Shoemaker (1950) 



B.A., Colgate; M.A., Syracuse; Ph.D., Virginia 

Robert N. Shorter (1958) 

B.A., Union College; M.A.. Ph.D., Duke 

Michael L. Sinclair (1968) 

B.A., Wake Forest; A.M., Ph.D.. Stanford 

David L. Smiley (1950) 

B.A., M.A.. Bavlor; Ph.D.. Wisconsin 



Professor of Romance Language] 

Professor of English 

Associate Professor of Historj 

Professor of History 



**Part-ttme, fall 1981 
***Part-time 



203 



J. Howell Smith (1965) 

B.A., Baylor; M.A., Tulane; Ph.D., Wisconsin 

Kathleen B. Smith (1981) 

B.A., Baldwin-Wallace; M.A., Ph.D., Purdue 

Margaret Supplee Smith (1979) 

B.S., Missouri; M.A., Case Western Reserve; Ph.D., Brown 

Cecelia H. Solano (1977) 

B.A., Radcliffe; M.A., Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 

Blanche C. Speer (1972) 

B.A., Howard Payne; M.A., Ph.D., Colorado 

Chris Stanley (1978) 

B.A., M.A., Bristol (Great Britian) 



Associate Professor of History 

Visiting Assistant Professor of Politics 

Associate Professor of Art 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 

Associate Professor of Linguistics 

Lecturer in Theatre Arts (London) 



[ohn Steele (1980) 

B.A., M.F.A., Humboldt State 

[ames A. Steintrager (1969) 

B.A., Notre Dame; M.A., Ph.D., Chicago 

Henry Smith Stroupe (1937) 

B.S., M.A., Wake Forest; Ph.D., Duke 

David A. Stump (1977) 

B.A., Trinity (Texas); M.A., Ph.D., Houston 

|oanne Margaret Sulek (1981) 
B.S., M.A., Wake Forest 

Anna-Vera Sullam (1972) 
B.A., Padua 

Robert L. Sullivan (1962) 

B.A., Delaware; M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina State 



Lecturer in Speech Communication 
and Theatre Arts 

Professor of Politics 

Professor of History 

Adjunct Instructor in Psychology 

Instructor in Mathematics 

Instructor in Romance Languages 
(Venice) 

Professor of Biology 
Instructor in Art 



Elizabeth A. Sutherland (1982) 

B.F.A., Boston; M.F.A., Temple 

Charles H. Talbert (1963) Professor of Religion 

B.A., Howard; B.D., Southern Baptist Seminary; Ph.D., V'anderbilt 

Thomas C. Taylor (1971) Associate Professor of Accountancy 

B.S., M.A., North Carolina (Chapel Hill); Ph.D., Louisiana State; 
C.P.A., North Carolina 



Harold C. Tedford (1965) 

B.A., Ouachita; M.A., Arkansas; Ph.D., Louisiana State 

Stanton K. Tefft (1964) 

B.A., Michigan State; M.S., Wisconsin; Ph.D., Minnesota 



Professor of Theatre Arts 
Professor of Anthropology 



*P art-time, fall 1981 
**Part-time 

tDied,July23, 1981 
ff Part-time, spring 1982 



204 

Olive S. Thomas (1978) Instructor in Busine:\ 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.B.A., North Carolina (Greensboro); C.P.A., North Carolina 

**Anne S. Tillett (1956, 1960) Professor of Romance Languagi 

B.A., Carson-Newman; M.A.. Vanderbilt; Ph.D., Northwestern 

Lowell R. Tillett (1956) Professor of Histo\ 

B.A., Carson-Newman; M.A., Columbia; Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

*Richard I. Tirrell (1977) Visiting Lecturer in Educatio^ 

B.S., Purdue; M.S., Kansas State 

Harry B. Titus Jr. (1981) Instructor in At, 

B.A., Wisconsin (Milwaukee); M.F.A., Princeton 

Ralph B. Tower (1980) Assistant Professor of Accountanr 

B.A.. Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill); M.B.A., Cornell 

**Sylvia Trelles (1977) Instructor in Romance Language 

B.A., Ripon; M.A., Michigan 

Robert W. Ulervjr. (1971) Associate Professor of Classical Language 

B.A., M.A.. Ph.D., Yale 

***Robert L. Utley Jr. ( 1 978) Visiting Assistant Professor of Politic 

B.A.. Wake Forest; M.A., Ph.D., Duke 

Marcellus E. Waddill (1962) Professor of Mathematid 

B.A., Hampden-Sydney; M.A., Ph.D., Pittsburgh 

J. Van Wagstaff (1964) Professor of Economic 

B.A., Randolph-Macon; M.B.A.. Rutgers; Ph.D., Yirgina 

James H. Wakeman (1981) Assistant Professor of Military Scienc 

B.S.Ed., M.A., NW Missouri State 

David E. Walters (1978) Assistant Professor of Military Scienc 

B.S., Florida State 

***Mary R. Wayne (1980) Lecturer in Speech Communications am 

B.F.A., Pennsylvania State; M.F.A.. Ohio State Theatre Art 

David S. Weaver (1977) Assistant Professor of Anthropology 

B.A., M.A., Arizona; Ph.D., New Mexico 

Peter D. Weigl (1968) Professor of Biolog 

B.A., Williams; Ph.D., Duke 

Byron R. Wells (1981) Instructor in Romance Language. 

B.A., M.A., Georgia 

Larry E. West (1969) Associate Professor of Germar 

B.A.. Berea; Ph.D., Vanderbilt 

****Floyd Edwin Wike Visiting Assistant Professor of Philosopk 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Ph.D., Pennsylvania State 



*Part-time, fall 1981 
**On leave, 1981-82 
***Part-time 
****Spring 1982 



205 



Jan J. Williams (1974) Associate Professor of History 

B.A., Stanford; Ph.D., Yale 

■eorge P. Williams (1958) Professor of Physics 

B.S., Richmond; M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Dhn E. Williams (1959) Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Richmond; M.A., Ph.D., Iowa 

dwin Graves Wilson ( 1 946, 1951) Professor of English 

B.A., Wake Forest; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard 

onald H. Wolfe (1968) Associate Professor of Theatre Arts 

B.S., M.S., Southern Illinois; Ph.D., Cornell 

rank B. Wood (1971) Adjunct Associate Professor of Psychology 

B.A., M.A., Wake Forest; M.Div., Southeastern Baptist Seminary; Ph.D., Duke 

alph C. Wood Jr. (1971) Associate Professor of Religion 

B.A., M.A., East Texas State; M.A., Ph.D., Chicago 

Ned Woodall (1969) Associate Professor of Anthropology 

B.A., M.A., Texas; Ph.D., Southern Methodist 

aymond L. Wyatt (1956) Professor of Biology 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

ichael L. Wyzan (1979) Assistant Professor of Economics 

A.B., Miami (Ohio); Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

L Buck Yearns Jr. (1945) Professor of History 

B.A., Duke; M.A., Georgia; Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

ichard L. Zuber (1962) Professor of History 

B.S., Appalachian; M.A., Emory; Ph.D., Duke 



On leave, fall 1981 
On leave, 1981-82 



206 

Emeriti 

Dates following names indicate period of service. 

Harold M. Barrow (1948-1977) Professor Emeritus of Physical Education 

B.A., Westminster; M.A., Missouri; P.E.D., Indiana 

Dalma Adolph Brown (1941—1973) Professor Emeritus of English 

B.A., M.A., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Ruth F. Campbell (1962-1974) Professor Ementa of Spanish 

B.A., North Carolina (Greensboro); M.A., North Carolina (Chapel Hill); Ph.D., Duke 

Marjorie Crisp (1947-1977) Associate Professor Emerila 

B.S., Appalachian; M.A., George Peabody of Physical Education 

Ethel T. Crittenden (1915-1946) Librarian Emerita< 

Hugh William Divine (1954—1979) Professor Emeritus of Law 

B.S., Georgia; M.A., Louisiana State; J. D., Emory; LL.M., S.J.D., Michigan 

*Cronje B. Earp (1940—1971) Professor Emeritus of Classical Languages 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia 

J. Allen Easley (1928—1963) Professor Emeritus of Religion 

B.A., Furman; Th.M., Southeastern Baptist Seminary; D.D., Furman 

Walter S. Flory (1963-1980) Babcock Professor Emeritus of Botany 

B.A., Bridgewater; M.A.. Ph.D., Virginia; Sc.D., Bridgewater 

**Edgar Estes Folk (1936-1967) Professor Emeritus of English 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.S., Columbia; Ph.D., George Peabody 

George J. Griffin (1948-1981) Professor Emeritus of Religion 

B.A., Wake Forest; Th.B., Southern Baptist Seminary; B.D., Yale; Ph.D., Edinburgh 

Ralph Cyrus Heath (1954—1969) Professor Emeritus of Marketing 

B.A., Princeton; MB. A., D.B.A., Indiana 

Owen F. Herring (1946-1963) Professor Emeritus of Religion 

B.A., M.A., Wake Forest; Th.M., Th.D., Southeastern Baptist Seminary; 
D.D., Georgetown 

Lois Johnson (1942-1962) Dean of Women Emerita 

B.A., Meredith; M.A., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Harry L. King Jr. (1960-1981) Professor Emeritus of Romance Languages 

B.A., Richmond; M.A., Ph.D.. North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Robert E. Lee (1946-1977) Professor Emeritus of Law and 

B.S., L.L.B., Wake Forest; M.A., Columbia; Dean Emeritus of the School of Law 

LL.M., S.J.D., Duke 

Jasper L. Memory Jr. (1929-1971) Professor Emeritus of Education 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Columbia 



* Died March 18, 1982 
** Diedjanuary 1, 1982 



207 



^rold Dawes Parcell (1935—1970) Professor Emeritus of Romance Languages 

B.A., North Carolina (Chapel Hill); A.M., Ph.D., Harvard 



Clarence H. Patrick (1946-1978) 



B.A., Wake Forest; B.D., Andover Newton; Ph.D., Duke 



Professor Emeritus of Sociology 



3rady S. Patterson (1924-1972) 
B.A., Wake Forest 

3eulah L. Raynor (1946-1979) 

B.A., East Carolina; M.A., Wake Forest 

When C. Reid (1917-18; 1920-1965) 

B.A., M.A., Wake Forest; Ph.D., Cornell 

i>aul S. Robinson (1952-1977) 



Registrar Emeritus 

Associate Professor Emerita of English 

Professor Emeritus of Philosophy 

Professor Emeritus of Music 



B.A., Westminster; B.M., Curtis; M.S.M., D.S.M., Union Seminary 

Harold Wayland Tribble (1950-1967) President Emeritus 

B.A., Richmond; Th.M., Th.D., Southern Baptist Seminary; M.A., Louisville; Ph.D., 
Edinburgh; D.D. Stetson; LL.D., Union, Wake Forest, Richmond, Duke, North Carolina 
(Chapel Hill) 

Zarroll W. Weathers (1950-1972) 
B.A., LL.B., Wake Forest 



David Welker (1969-1980) 

B.A., M.A., Illinois; Ph.D., Minnesota 

Carlton P. West (1928-1975) 



Professor Emeritus of Law and 
Dean Emeritus of the School of Law 

Professor Emeritus of Theatre Arts 



Librarian Emeritus 



B.A., Boston; M.A., Yale; B.A. in L.S., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 




Provost and Professor of English Edwin G. Wilson talk with students. 



208 



The Committees of the Faculty 

September 1, 1982 

The terms of members, except where otherwise shown, expire on August 31 of the' 
year indicated. Each committee selects its own chairman except where the chairman! 
is designated. All members of a committee vote except as otherwise indicated. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEES 

The Committee on Academic Affairs 

Non-voting. Dean of Men, Dean of Women, Associate Dean. Assistant Dean, and one 
student in the College. Voting. Dean of the College; 1985 David A. Hills, Peter D. 
VVeigl; 1984John R. Earle, W. Graham May; 1983 Shasta M. Bryant, John H. Litcher,' 
and one student in the College. 

The Committee on Admissions 

Non-voting. Director of Admissions and Financial Aid, Associate Dean of the College, 
Dean of Women, and one student in the College. Voting. Dean of the College; 1985 
Richard D. Carmichael, Timothv F. Sellner; 1984 Carl V. Harris, J. Edwin Hen- 
dricks; 1983 Nancy J. Cotton, Charles L. Richman, and one student in the College. 

The Committee on Scholarships and Student Aid 

Non-voting. One student in the College. Voting. Dean of the College, Director of 
Admissions and Financial Aid, Dean of Women, Associate Dean; 1985 Alonzo W. 
Kenion. Willie Pearsonjr.; 1984 Andrew V. Ettin, Willie L. Hinze; 1983 Deborah L. 
Best, Jon M. Reinhardt, and one student in the College. 

The Committee on Curriculum 

Provost, Dean of the College, Registrar, and the chairman of each department of the 
College as follows: Division I. Art, Classical Languages. English. German, Music, 
Romance Languages, Speech Communication and Theatre Arts. Division II. Biology, 
Chemistry, Mathematics, Physical Education, Physics. Division III. Education. His- 
torv. Military Science. Philosophv. Religion; Division IV. Anthropologv, Business and 
Accountancv, Economics. Politics, Psychology-, Sociology. 



ADVISORY COMMITTEES 

The Committee on Academic Planning 

Non-voting. Provost and one student in the College. Voting. Dean of the College, 
Director of Libraries; 1986 Robert Knott, Roger A. Hegstrom; 1985 Fred L. Horton 



209 

Jr., Richard D. Sears; 1984 Ellen E. Kirkman, David B. Levy; 1983 James P. Bare- 
field, John C. Moorhouse, and one student in the College. 

The Committee on Athletics 

Non-voting. Director of Athletics. Voting. Vice President and Treasurer, Dean of the 
College, faculty representative to the Atlantic Coast Conference; 1987 Robert W. 
Brehme, Joseph O. Milner; 1986 Thomas F. Gossett, Ralph C. Wood Jr.; 1985 
Donald E. Frey, Donald O. Schoonmaker; 1984 Marcus B. Hester, J. Don Reeves; 
1983 Ivey C. Gentry, Jeanne Owen. 

The Committee on Institutional Planning 

Non-voting. Provost, Vice President and Treasurer, and one student in the College. 
Voting. Dean of the College; 1986 Kathleen M. Glenn, Elmer K. Hayashi; 1985 
Robert C. Beck, Charles M. Lewis; 1984 James C. McDonald, William M. Moss; 1983 
James G. McDowell, J. Van Wagstaff, and one student in the College. 

The Committee on Nominations 

Voting. 1985 Elizabeth Phillips, Howard W. Shields; 1984 Wilmer D. Sanders, Anne 
S. Tillett; 1983 John L. Andronica, Ronald E. Noftle. 

The Committee on Library Planning 

Non-voting. Provost, Dean of the Graduate School, one faculty representative from 
the Committee on Academic Planning, and one student in the College. Voting. One 
faculty member from each department in the College, Dean of the College, Director 
of Libraries, and one student in the College. 



SPECIAL COMMITTEES 

The Committee on Publications 

Dean of the College, Vice President and Treasurer, Director of Communications, the 
three faculty advisers of Old Gold and Black. The Student, and The Howler; 1985 To be 
appointed; 1984 Richard L. Shoemaker; 1983 W. Buck Yearns Jr. 

The Committee for Teacher Education 

Dean of the College, Dean of the Graduate School, Chairman of the Department of 
^Education; 1985 To be appointed; 1984 John E. Collins, Gregorio C. Martin; 1983 
IJohn V. Baxley, Richard D. Sears. 

The Committee for the ROTC 

;Dean of the College; the ROTC Coordinator, the Professor of Military Science; 1985 
To be appointed; 1984 Philippe R. Falkenberg; 1983 Thomas C. Taylor. 



210 



The Committee on Honors 

Non-voting. One student in the College. Voting, Dean of the College, the Coordinat( 
of the Honors Program; 1986 David S. Weaver; 1985 John A. Carter Jr.; 1984 
Howell Smith; 1983 James Kuzmanovich, and one student in the College. 

The Committee of Lower Division Advisers (1982—83) 

Dean of the College; Chairman of the Lower Division Advisers (Larrv E. West 
James P. Barefield, David B. Brovles, Richard D. Carmichael, John E. Collins, Gai 
A. Cook, NancyJ. Cotton, Cyclone Covey, Leo Ellison Jr., Herman E. Eure, Philipp 
R. Falkenberg, Charles V. Ganelin, Louis Goldstein, Paul M. Gross, Carl V. Harri' 
Catherine T. Harris, Elmer K. Hayashi, N. Rick Heatley, Marcus B. Hester, David A 
Hills. Fred L. Horton Jr., Susan Jackels, Paul H. D. Kaplan, Ralph C. Kennedy II 
Ellen E. Kirkman. Lula M. Leake. David B. Lew. Charles M. Lewis. John H. Litche 
George E. Matthews Jr.. W. Graham May, James G. McDowell, Robert D. Mill 
Ronald E. Noftle, A. Thomas Olive, Willie Pearson Jr., Gregory D. Pritchan 
Marianne A. Schubert. Ben M. Seelbinder. Timothv F. Sellner, Cecelia H. Solanc 
Robert L. Sullivan, Robert W. Uleryjr., Marcellus E. Waddill. David S. Weaver, Pete 
D. Weigh Ravmond L. Wvatt. Director of Peer Advisers Program: David W. Catron. 

The Committee on Orientation 

Dean of the College, Chairman of the Lower Division Advisers, Dean of Men. Dea 
of Women. President of the Student Government or his or her representative, am 
other persons from the administration and student bodv invited bv the chairmar 

The Committee on Records and Information 

Non-voting. The Registrar. Voting. Dean of the College. Archivist, Vice President d 
the Faculty, Secretary of the Faculty, 1985 To be appointed; 1984 Robert H. Dufor 
1983 Ravmond L. Wvatt. 

The Committee on Open Curriculum 

Dean of the College; 1986 Herman E. Eure, Michael L. Sinclair: 1985 Jeanne Ower" 
Larry E. West; 1984 Fred L. Horton Jr., FredricT. Howard; 1983 John L. Andron 
ca, J. Ned Woodall. 



JOINT FACULTY/ADMINISTRATION COMMITTEES 

The Joint Admissions Committee 

Dean of the College, Director of Admissions and Financial Aid. Provost, Nancy 
Cotton, John W. Nowell, Charles H. Talbert. 



211 



The Judicial Council 

administration. Toby A. Hale, Patricia A. Johansson. Faculty. George P. Williams; Fred 
j. Horton Jr., Jeanne Owen, Blanche C. Speer; two students in the College. Faculty 
Alternates. To be appointed, Carlton T. Mitchell. Administrative Alternate. To be 
;ppointed; and one student alternate. 

The Committee on Student Life 

)ean of the College or his designate. Dean of Women, Dean of Men; 1985 To be 
ppointed; 1984 Michael D. Hazen; 1983 Brian M. Austin, and three students in the 
College. 



OTHER FACULTY ASSIGNMENTS 

Faculty Advisers to the Honor Council 

1985 To be appointed; 1984 Philippe R. Falkenberg, 1983 Nancy J. Cotton. 

Faculty Advisers to Student Judicial Board 

1985 To be appointed; 1984 Catherine T. Harris, 1983 David B. Broyles. 

Faculty Marshals 

Carlton T. Mitchell, John E. Parker Jr., Mary Frances Robinson 

University Senate 

'resident, Provost, Vice-President for Health Affairs, Vice-President and Treasurer, 
)ean of the College, Dean of the School of Business and Accountancy, Dean of the 
Graduate School, Dean of the School of Law; Dean of the Babcock Graduate School 
if Management; Dean of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Director of Librar- 
:s, and the following: 

lepresentatives of the College: 1986 Carlton T. Mitchell, Mary Frances Robinson; 1985 
ack D. Fleer, Donald H. Wolfe; 1984 Ralph S. Fraser, Robert M. Helm; 1983 Bvnum 
i. Shaw, Charles H. Talbert. 

lepresentatives of the School of Business and Accountancy: 1985 Arun P. Dewasthali; 1983 
tephen Ewing. 

'representatives of the Graduate School: 1986 Lawrence R. DeChatelet; 1985 Ronald V. 
pimock; 1984 Percival Perry; 1983 Howard W. Shields. 

Representatives of the School of Law: 1985 Richard G. Bell; 1983 Joel S. Newman. 

lepresentatives of the Babcock Graduate School of Management: 1985 James M. Clapper; 
983 Thomas A. GoHo. 

'epresentatives of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine: 1986 B. Mosely White; 1985 
Robert W. Prichard; 1984 Timothy C. Pennell; 1983 C. Douglas Maynard. 



212 



OTHER COMMITTEES 

Equal Opportunity Advisory Committee 

Albert Anderson, Kim Bern, Ronald Boston, Edgar D. Christman, Thomas B. 
Clarkson, Robert A. Diseker, James L. Ferrell, Ross A. Griffith, G. Gene Hooks, Jean 
B. Hopson, Norman N. Klase, Thomas E. Mullen, Willie Pearson Jr., Gharles L. 
Richman, Charles P. Rose Jr., Marianne A. Schubert, Sally Schumacher, Margaret S. 
Smith, Nat E. Smith, Thomas C. Tavlor. 



University Grievance Committee 

College. 1986 Robert W. Lovett, Leo Ellison Jr. (alternate), Graduate School. 1984- 
Richard W. St. Clair, David W. Catron (alternate). School of Law. 1985 Charles P. Rose 
Jr., James E. Bond (alternate), Babcock Graduate School of Management. 1983 MelvinJ. 
Steckler, Robert N. White (alternate), Bowman Gray School of Medicine. 




Thomas E. Mullen, Dean of the College 



Index 



213 



Academic Awards, 24 

Academic Calendar, 34 

Accountancy, 167 

Accreditation, 1 1 

Administration, 185 

Admission Deposit, 30, 32 

Admission Requirements, 29 

Advanced Placement, 30 

Advising, 34 

Anthropology, 66 

Application for Admission, 29 

Applied Music Fees, 32 

Art, 70 

Art History, 70 

Artists Series, 27 

Asian Studies, 74 

Athletic Awards, 25, 26 

Athletic Scholarships, 25,26 

Athletics, 25 

Attendance Requirements, 35 

Auditing, 35 

Babcock Graduate School of 

Management, 9 
Basic Course Requirements, 56 
Biology, 76 

Board of Trustees, 182 
Board of Visitors, 183 
Bowman Gray School of Medicine. 9 
Buildings and Grounds, 9 
Business, 165 

Business and Accountancy, 9, 163 
Calendar, 2 
Campus Ministry, 26 
Carswell Scholarships, 41 
Case Referral Panel, 23 
Charges, 31, 32, 33 
Chemistry, 80 
Chinese, 151 
Class Attendance, 35 
Classical Languages, 82 
Classics, 84 
Classification, 34 
CLEP, 30 
College History and Development, 15 



College Union, 23 

Combined Degrees, 61, 62 

Committees of the Faculty, 208 

Computer Center, 10 

Computer Science, 111) 

Concessions, 49 

Course Numbers, 59 

Course Repetition, 38 

Courses of Instruction, 66 

Cultural Activities, 26 

Dance. 124 

Dean's List, 38 

Debate, 26 

Degree Requirements, 55 

Degrees, 55 

Degrees Conferred, 169 

Dentistry Degree, 64 

Dijon Semester, 53, 147 

Distinctions, 38 

Divisional Course Requirements, 56 

Double Majors, 59 

Dropping a Course, 36 

Early Decision, 30 

Eastern European Studies, 60 

Economics, 86 

Education, 89 

Educational Planning, 27 

Emeriti, 206 

Engineering Degree, 64 

English, 95 

Enrollment, 179 

Examinations, 36 

Exchange Scholarships, 47 

Expenses, 3 1 

Faculty, 191 

Fees, 3 1 

Fields of Study, 58 

Financial Aid, 47 

Food Services, 32 

Foreign Area Studies, 51 

Forestry and Environmental 

Studies Degree, 64 
Fraternities, 24 
French, 144 



214 




French Semester, 53. 147 


Mathematical Economics, 86, 110 


Geographical Distribution, 180 


Mathematics, 109 


German. 99 


Maximum Number of Courses, 59 


German Studies, 60 


Medical School, 9 


Grade Reports, 38 


Medical Sciences Degree, 62 


Grading System, 37 


Medical Technology Degree, 62 


Graduate School, 9 


Microbiology Degree, 63 


Graduation Distinctions, 38 


Military Science, 113 


Graduation Requirements, 55 


Ministerial Concessions, 49 


Greek. 83 


Minor in Cultural Resource 


Handicapped Students. Admission. 30 Preservation. 60 


Hankins Scholarships, 41 


Minors, 59 


Health Service, 28 


Mortar Board. 24. 178 


Hebrew, 143 


Music, 114 


Hindi, 151 


Music Education, 118 


History, 101 


Music Ensemble, 119 


Honor Council, 22 


Music History, 1 17 


Honor Societies. 24, 178 


Music Theory, 1 15 


Honor Code. 22 


North Carolina Student Incentive 


Honors Studv, 51, 107 


Grants. 45 


Housing, 33 


Norwegian, 152 


Humanities, 105 


Omicron Delta Kappa. 24, 178 


Incomplete Grades. 37 


Open Curriculum, 51 


Independent Studv. 53 


Orientation, 34 


Indian Semester. 53 


Pass/Fail Grades. 37 


Intercollegiate Athletics, 25 


Pell Grants, 42 


Interdisciplinary Honors, 107 


Phi Beta Kappa. 24, 178 


Interdisciplinary Minor, 60 


Philosophy. 121 


Interfraternitv Council. 24 


Physical Education, 124 


Intersocietv Council. 24 


Physical Education Requirement, 57, 12; 


Intramural Athletics, 25 


Physician Assistant Program Degree, 63 


Italian, 152 


Phvsics, 128 


Italian Studies, 61 


Placement Service, 27 


Joint Majors. 59 


Politics, 130 


Journalism, 96 


Probation, 38 


Judicial Board, 23 


Procedures, 29 


Latin, 83 


Professional Fraternities, 24 


Latin American Studies. 61 


Professional Schools, 9 


Law Degree. 61 


Proficiency in the English 


Law School. 9 


Language, 57 


Libraries. 1 1 


Psychological Services, 27 


Loans. 47 


Psychology, 135 


London Semester, 52 


Publications, 26 


Lower Division Requirements, 58 


Purpose, 14 


Majors, 59 


Radio Station, 26 


Management School, 9 


Radio/Television/Film, 160 



215 



Readmission Requirements, 40 

Recognition. 1 1 

Refunds, 33 

Registration, 34 

Religion, 139 

Religious Activities, 26 

Repetition of Courses, 38 

Requirements for Continuation 

Requirements for Degrees, 55 

Residence Councils, 23 

Residence Hall Charges, 32 

Residence House Council, 23 

Residential Language Centers, 49 

Reynolds Scholarships. 5 1 

Romance Languages, 143 

Room Charges, 32 

ROTC. 113^ 

.Russian, 152 

Salamanca Semester, 53, 150 

salem College Study, 52 

scholarships, 41 

senior Conditions, 40 

senior Testing, 61 

societies, Social, 24 

sociology, 153 

Spanish, 148 

Spanish Semester, 53, 150 

Spanish Studies, 61 

special Programs, 51 



Speech Communication, 156 
Student/Student Spouse 

Employment, 50 
Student Covernment, 22 
Student Legislature, 22 
Student Life, 22 
Student Publications, 26 
39 Studio Art. 74 

Study Abroad, 52 

Summer Session, 52 

Summer Study Elsewhere, 52 

Teaching Area Requirements, 91 

Theatre Arts, 161 

Transcripts, 38 

Transfer Credit, 31, 55 

Trustees, 182 

Tuition, 31 

Undergraduate Schools, 13 

University, 8 

Upper Division Study, 58 

Vehicle Registration, 33 

Venice Semester, 53, 152 

Veteran Benefits, 50 

Visitors, 183 

WFDD-FM. 26 

Withdrawal from the 

College, 36 
Women's Residence Council, 23 
Work/Study Program, 49 




216 



Bulletins of Wake Forest University 

The Undergraduate Schools 

Director of Admissions and Financial Aid 

7305 Reynolda Station 

Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109 

919-761-5201 

The Graduate School 

Dean of the Graduate School 

7487 Reynolda Station 

Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109 

919-761-5301 

The School of Law 

Director of Admissions 

7206 Reynolda Station 

Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109 

919-761-5437 

The Babcock Graduate School of Management 

Director of Admissions 

7659 Reynolda Station 

Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109 

919-761-5422 

The Bowman Gray School of Medicine 

Associate Dean for Admissions 

300 S. Hawthorne Road 

Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27103 

919-748-4265 

The Summer Session 

Dean of the Summer Session 

7293 Reynolda Station 

Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109 

919-761-5227 

Mart)' Lentz, University Editor 
Terry Hvdell, Assistant 



Wake Forest University administers all educational and employment activities withou 
discrimination because of race, color, religion, nation origin, age, handicap, or sex 
except where exempt. 







Director of Admissions 
Wake Forest University 
Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109 



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Winston-Salem, North Caroli 

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